Gardner-Webb University

Discovery and integration: A framework of spiritual formation for the leadership team of via faith community, Winston-Salem, NC

Author
Linda Marie Jones
Abstract
For the Lord is the Spirit, and wherever the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. So all of us who have had that veil removed can see and reflect the glory of the Lord. And the Lord-who is the Spirit-makes us more and more like him as we are changed into his glorious image. (2 Corinth, 3:17-18, NLT )

The process of spiritual formation can be seen throughout all of scripture; men and women, growing in faith, learning to truly love God, themselves and God's people. There is something so special to be on this journey of faith with a loving, laughing, growing group of Christians as we learn to be mature, committed, faith-filled people of God. This project endeavored to take the leaders of Via Faith Community through a five week spiritual formation process, hoping to create a higher functioning, more spiritually mature leadership team. Utilizing prayer, Lectio Divina, sermons, Bible studies, and assessments of personality, spiritual gifts, leadership and conflict style in a weekly workshop session and worship service, the hearts and minds of the leadership team were awakened, as they discovered and integrated the biblical and theological principles of humanity, created in God's image and given unique personalities, abilities, experiences, and spiritual gifts through the work of the Holy Spirit, in order to effectively join God in the work of the Kingdom of God.

Empowering clinical staff to provide spiritual care for patients with life limiting illness and their family members under hospice cleveland county care

Author
Terry Pinkney Floyd
Abstract
Staff members at Hospice Cleveland County struggle to provide quality spiritual care to dying patients or their family members because the staff members are not trained chaplains. Staff members tend to fall back on "pat" answers that can sometimes cause the patient or family members to have even more unresolved spiritual issues.

This project sought to determine whether or not hospice staff could become more empowered to give quality spiritual care by being introduced to the basics of pastoral care to the dying and their families. Information was shared by way of presentations; practical experience was gained by role-playing and shadowing.

The pre-test/post-test scores indicate that the participants learned the basic theology of pastoral care to dying patients and their families. There was enthusiastic verbal affirmation of the process, including the desire to repeat the project for a longer period of time. Individual growth of the vast majority of the participants, as a result of the project, has resulted in better care of the patients and more job satisfaction for the participants.

Incorporating giving as an integral part of worship at Blessed Harvest Institute of Charlotte, North Carolina

Author
Brian Gerard Fite
Abstract
Giving is one of the most effective forms of worship we have available to us, but it has become the most exploitive and misunderstood element of the worship service. The methods and language used to frame giving within worship have led to exploitation resulting in unwillingness to wholeheartedly participate in giving as an element of worship. The literature addressing giving and the biblical interpretations are lacking in accurately speaking to the issues that arise in applying Old and New Testament scripture to address giving as an element of worship. There are a growing number of articles attempting to address the covetous nature involved in the methods and language used in inviting people to give to God. This work evaluated the giving practice in Blessed Harvest Institute by evaluating some Old and New Testament scriptures and determining how the interpretations are to be applied in the methods and language used to frame the giving experience in the worship service. Leviticus 27:30-33, Deuteronomy 14:22-29, Malachi 3, Acts 3-5, 2 Corinthians 8-9, and other scriptures were used to understand the methods and language of giving biblically. Giving is to be a freewill expression of worship executed in an environment of liberty. It is necessary to reframe the concept of tithing not to be an obligation but a personal choice to express worship to God. Any prompting will remove worship from giving. Worship is a free expression that must be voluntary; therefore, giving must be voluntarily expressed, not grudgingly, by compulsion or of necessity, in order to be an element of worship.

Helping the Parents of Middle School Students Communicate Biblical Truths of Sexuality at the First Baptist Church of Lenoir, North Carolina

Author
Thomas Russell Hinton
Abstract
An educational program was developed to discover the role of the church in promoting healthy parent/child communication about sexuality. Believing scripture affirms sexuality as a blessing from God, parents and middle school youth were recruited and led through the study. Surveys measured attitudes, opinions, and understanding of biblical knowledge, anatomy, and communication levels. After the program the families were given two months to observe parent/child communication. Final surveys indicated that the church can play an active role in promoting parent child communication about sexuality, and participants reflected a positive outcome by recommending the continuation of this program as a part of the on-going youth ministry of the church.

Glimpses of Heaven among Friends: The Utilization of Film to Draw Interest in Small Group Studies at the First Baptist Church of Albemarle

Author
Roger William Thomas
Abstract
A small group study about heaven in scripture and contemporary film was developed in order to create interests in small groups. Believing small groups, discussions of the after life, and the power of storytelling are affirmed throughout scripture, individuals were recruited and led through the study. Surveys measured opinions on heaven and small groups among the entire congregation and the small group participants. Following the study, the participants were surveyed one final time on both subjects. Ultimately the study did not always change minds with concern to the afterlife, but the overall opinions of small group experiences seemed to be broadened.

Transforming Attitudes and Commitment to Missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Greenville, South Carolina

Author
Jermaine A Boyce
Abstract
This ministry project's goal was to seek transformation in attitudes and commitment to missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Greenville, South Carolina. The goal of transformation was to guide the congregation's mission practices to be exemplary of its 'Missionary' name and the overall mission of the church as discovered in Luke-Acts and in the Abrahamic Covenant.

The project tested the attitudes and commitment to missions from the Missionary Society in comparison to the general congregation. The project revealed both strengths and weaknesses in the attitudes and commitments of the Missionary Society and the congregation about missions. The research from the project revealed that there were strong contradictions between the findings from the surveys completed by the project participants and the content from the discussions during the training exercises. One of the three primary goals was achieved outright, and several secondary goals emerged as a result of the project; particularly the creation of a strategic plan to assess and evaluate the future mission practices of the church.

Spiritual Care for Missionaries within the Ministry Context of Make Way Partners

Author
Milton R Smith
Abstract
Spiritual Care for Missionaries Within the Ministry Context of Make Way Partners is the report of a research project. The objective of this project was to study the spiritual care of missionaries within the ministry context of Make Way Partners (MWP). The ministry context of MWP is to prevent and combat human trafficking. The context of this project was in the country of Sudan, in and near Darfur.

In particular, the study addressed the possibility that the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator might aid the leadership of MWP in predicting how missionaries might respond to stress in the field. Also, the project provided an opportunity to find a tool to help evaluate those missionaries who experience trauma due to the stress of the field. Additionally, this project gave an opportunity to reflect upon the mission strategy of MWP.

UnderANDING

Author
J A T
Abstract
There is a documented need for caring education regarding patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) for nursing students and nursing staff. The autism spectrum population is increasing, one in 59 children in the United States as reported by the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network (as cited in Baio et al., 2018). Nurses are expected to provide appropriate care, showing respect and understanding at all times to both the client and family. Through lack of knowledge and misunderstanding the ASD population has not been given this care. Based on Watson’s Theory of Caring, an educational ASD caring program was created for a summer session Family Nurse Practitioner assessment class. This educational program provided basic knowledge of ASD and appropriate communication skills for caregivers, guided by caring science concepts. Using the Caring Factor Survey-Care Provider Version, Short Version (CFS-CPV) by Nelson, Thiel, Hozak, and Thomas (2016), and the Autism Knowledge Survey-Revised (AKS-R) by Swiezy, Stuart, and Ashby (2005), student perceived ability to care and student knowledge of ASD were measured. Nursing curriculums and continuing education offerings should include knowledge related to working with special populations, such as those with communication disorders. Nursing practice guided by caring science principles help nurses to build authentic relationships with patients and families resulting in better health outcomes. THIS WAS PLACED IN INCORRECT LOCATION. PLEASE DISMISS. Thank you.

Imaging spiritual growth for the iPhone generation taking college-aged young adults on a pilgrim's journey in Dallas, NC

Author
Jonathan K Pugh
Abstract
Today's generation of college-aged young adults have proven to be the least-connected to the church in American history. Their immersion in technology absent of the traditional church setting has necessitated the strong need for church leaders to actively engage this generation in communities of deep relational discipleship. This project created a small-group setting geared particularly toward young adults to introduce them to the themes of spiritual journey found in John Bunyan's classic work, The Pilgrim's Progress. The small group proved to be a successful method that most churches can replicate to reach young people who might otherwise find themselves outside of a church body.
Subscribe to Gardner-Webb University