Commitment (Psychology)

Mindset, marital satisfaction, and volunteer commitment: a qualitative study with volunteer marriage leaders in northwest Arkansas

Author
Stewart D Grant
Abstract
This is an phenomenological project from a constructivist viewpoint to determine why five marriage education couples exceeded their volunteer commitment. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in order to understand the intrinsic and relational variables contributing to their service duration. Themes identified were (1) faith and belief as a framework, (2) personal and relational growth, and (3) growth mindset. A conceptual model of mindset appeared that served commitment and intent. This model is discussed, along with integration and other research models. Implications for volunteer coordinators and pastors of enrichment programs are suggested, along with ideas for future research.

An identification and evaluation of the traits necessary for a healthy marriage where one spouse has a long-term, non-terminal, physical disability

Author
Gregory A Hattberg
Abstract
This study seeks to answer the following research questions: What traits are necessary to produce a healthy relationship in a couple where one spouse has a long-term, non-terminal physical disability and what is characteristic of those traits? These are questions that began to identify and evaluate the traits in healthy couples. While many studies focus on factors that negatively affect marriages, this study will center on those traits that are seen to strengthen a marriage. Two methods of research were used. First, non-experimental, descriptive quantitative surveys to qualify healthy couples. Second, qualitative, personal interviews were conducted with the healthy couples. Commitment and communication are necessary traits for a healthy marriage with commitment being more essential. Commitment and communication are essential but no indication of which is more important.
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