Self-care, Health

Reducing Compassion Fatigue by Implementing a Self-Care Initiative for Emergency Department Nurses in a Community Hospital

Author
Gregory A Schmalfeldt
Abstract
Emergency department nurses perform in a highly stressful setting. As a result, researchers have identitifed compassion fatigue as a problematic side-effect of caring for patients with significant emotional and physical distress. Without purposeful intervention, compassion fatigue can lead to more serious conditions such as secondary stress syndrome or burnout. This study explored root causes of exposure to suffering, futility, detachment from patients, and leadership influence. To mitigate the effects of compassion fatigue, the researcher provided a holistic self-care program among emergency department nurses (N=10) at a community-centered hospital. Participants benefited from improved emotional intelligence, physical resilience, spiritual sensitivity, and interpersonal support.

An Investigation of Self-Care Practices and Principles Among the Pentecostal-Apostolic Clergy

Author
Chelsea A Hall
Abstract
The perspectives and practices of self-care among Pentecostal Apostolic (P-A) clergy from United Pentecostal Church International, Worldwide Pentecostal Fellowship, and independent organizations, were investigated through a convergent-parallel mixed-method design. Analysis of self-reported survey data with triangulation of biblical, theological and psychological literature reviews produced four principles of self-care essential for P-A clergy. Self-care must be holistic, focused on personal not congregational well being, practice active non-judgmental self-awareness, and accept personal limitations. Self-worth resides in God's acceptance, not ministerial success or failure. Participants reported embracing the necessity of self-care without adequate practice and displayed a fragmented understanding of the concept and concept application.

A Model for Small Church Leadership to Support Thier Minister's Self-Care

Author
Jeremy S Allard
Abstract
The complexity of vocational ministry is difficult to manage and maintain. Balancing the complex nature of the church, relationships, family life, spiritual and personal life provides the minister with a struggle that rarely ceases. Pursuing self-care within this environment can provide relief to the struggle but is difficult to do alone. The study seeks to provide a model for local church leadership to support their minister so he or she can successfully manage ministry and personal life through self-care practices. The project identified ministers employed in Stone-Campbell churches with a weekly attendance of less than 125 in Minnesota and Wisconsin. A survey was sent to these ministers asking what types of support they receive from their congregation and leadership. The results of the survey identified five ministers who received the highest support. These five ministers were interviewed to determine the relationship between the church leadership support and their self care practices. The biblical and theological review examined the imago Dei's relationship with the elements of self-care with a priority towards spiritual formation. The literature review identified six strategies for successful self-care practice. The interviews identified three relationships that influence the practice of a minister's self-care. These relationships are the foundation to the model for how church leadership can support their minister's self-care.

The creative self of the therapist: a study in self care

Author
Jennifer A Schiller
Abstract
Therapists may care for others to their own detriment, failing to recognize and provide for their own needs. Without sufficient care of self, therapists risk burn out, empathy overload, and an inability to continue in the profession. A particular problem exists for marriage and family therapy interns balancing academic studies, clinical practice and personal lives. This project explores intern therapist engagement in creative activities as a form of self-care and stress reduction. While self-report scales reflect the benefit of creative activities for self-care, more study is needed. Questions remain regarding the specific needs of intern therapists and the role of program leadership in providing a healthy model for self-care.

Take care with self-care: an exploratory study of intentional clergy self-care among African American women in ministry

Author
Altonnette D Hawkins
Abstract
The creation of a safe, sacred space for African-American women in ministry to share their stories encourages an inward journey of self-reflection, renewal, reconnection, and rest. This study explored intentional clergy self-care based on the researcher's PMS model of prayer, meditation and support. Using qualitative research, a face-to-face six-week study with a clergy peer group and a secondary study using an online questionnaire were conducted. The results showed that pastors experience greater stress in ministry than those in other ministry positions. On-going self-care awareness and support across geographic and denominational boundaries were factors in promoting community and sustainability.

The challenge of longevity associated with after-care workers of victims of sexual exploitation

Author
Pamela Lew MacRae
Abstract
This study was to investigate the challenge of tenure longevity associated with after-care workers for sexually exploited victims. The goal was to find factors that contribute to the after-care worker's tenure. Four case studies focused on questions related to burnout, secondary trauma, support and training. Significant findings revealed issues in categories of motivation, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, vicarious victimization, compassion fatigue, self-care, support and training. After-care workers universally reported significant burnout and secondary trauma. Training, support and healthy self-care measures were found to be a contributing factor of longevity. The findings revealed that after-care workers would benefit from increased educational preparation, organizational support and healthy self-care measures.

Self-care in the form of Sabbath

Author
Felicia Williams Redmon
Abstract
The author researched issues within the church's professional ministry relative to the challenges of faith-based communities suffering from a lack of spiritual growth and effective ministry. Pretest assessments, using surveys, questionnaires, and interviews, of leaders from a diverse background of denominations, showed deficits in areas due to a lack of effective self-care. The primary intervention for this study was a workshop entitled, "Walking in My Destiny with Effective Self-Care." The workshop taught how to use the biblical notions of Sabbath and Sabbatical to improve self-care. Overall, participants' posttests revealed that the workshop enhanced self-care, even though continuation is necessary for effectiveness.
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