Church music--Reformed churches

Musical instruments and musicians in the worship of the Canadian Reformed Churches

Author
Theodore E Lodder
Abstract
In the Canadian Reformed Churches there is both a shortage of qualified organists and a growing number of musicians who play musical instruments other than the organ, resulting in much discussion and debate about which musical instruments are the most appropriate for worship. A lack of biblical awareness and leadership concerning music in worship, combined with limited or mediocre resources and training, cultural influences, and other factors, have contributed to the present situation. This study explores, analyzes, and critiques this situation on the basis of biblical-theological and confessionally Reformed principles, taking into consideration the historical, philosophical, practical, and pastoral factors related to musical instruments and musicians in worship.

"Play it again, psalm!" towards a rediscovery of the tradition of metrical psalm singing in the Presbytery of Orkney

Author
Graham D Deans
Abstract
Metrical psalm singing has featured regularly in the worship of the Reformed tradition in general, and of the Church of Scotland in particular, for over four hundred years, but is currently in a transitional phase, which offers both challenge and opportunity. This paper examines traditional practices, and considers their implications for future exercise of ministry. It also evaluates a Psalmody Festival designed for the Presbytery of Orkney, which sought to introduce new metrical psalm versions at regional level, and to offer a possible model for assisting the reawakening of local interest in the rich resources of the Psalter.

The effect of music ministry in church growth

Author
Min Joo Ra
Abstract
Music ministry provides a passageway for the spreading of the Gospel and the sacraments, and thus results in both quantitative and qualitative church growth. Pastor Min Joo Ra's study is based upon his personal experience of God's powerful hand working through the medium of music within his church, Los Angeles Korean Presbyterian Bible Church. Members renewed their fervor for church as God's love was more fully experienced in light of one of God's precious gifts to man: music. The development of the church's music ministry resulted in a two hundred fifty percent increase in membership and contributed in improvement of members' spirituality.

A model for music ministry in large Presbyterian (USA) churches

Author
Roger Gayle Miller
Abstract
This project proposes that large congregations of the Presbyterian Church (USA) should move beyond divisions between traditional and contemporary musical styles by placing them in the larger context of liturgical principles of the Directory for Worship, biblical images of the church, and characteristics of contemporary American culture. From field research in three congregations the project concludes that a wide variety of musical styles is desirable in order to express the full range of human emotions, meet needs of diverse personalities and learning preferences, and engage a broad range of ecclesiological metaphors.

A guide to the folk music with guitar accompaniment of the worshipbook

Author
Sheppard Dean Lawrence
Abstract
This project consists of two items: (1) a paper on folk music and guitar and how they function in the The Worshipbook, and (2) a tape of the "Musical Responses-III Setting" plus selected hymns from The Worshipbook, all recorded with the guitar. The tape is a practical tool for churches interested in learning new hymns and responses. guitar accompaniments on the tape can help those who want to learn how to sing with the instrument. Brief instructions and commentary are offered between each of the musical selections. The paper gives an historical and theological rationale for the use of folk music and guitar in worship. It proposes guidelines and makes suggestions as to the best way a congregation can utilize this approach. The latter portion of the paper gives a complete background of the "Musical Responses" of The Worshipbook.
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