Bible--Matthew--Criticism, interpretation

Creating Discipling Cultures through the Development of Shared Metaphor

Author
Patrick S Grabendike
Abstract
This project is intended to aid students and ministry leaders in creating disciplining cultures through the development of shared metaphor. It includes the theological foundations for discipleship as well as the creative process of conveying said discipleship through creative language and visual tools. The project addresses the linguistic challenge Christian Churches can experience as a result of generational and theological differences. This project is a culmination of Westbrook Church's experience as it sought to create congregational minstry allignment by means of new metaphor that would expression the mission of the church found in Matthew 28:18-20. The conclusion is that a church community can elevate the expectation for spiritual growth and alignment through collaboration and the creation of a shared metaphor for discipleship.

Disciple making: the task of the church

Author
William B Wilson
Abstract
A local community of faith can begin to challenge itself to discover and lead a life of discipleship with a training event centered on the gospel of Matthew. This thesis was tested by conducting a six-week Bible study on selected passages from Matthew for the Administrative Board and Council of Ministries of Clonmell United Methodist Church. As a followup to this study, the annual planning session for the church was conducted and a new mission statement was developed with visioning and goal-setting. The conclusions of this project illustrates that a church can become a disciple-making community of believers for Jesus Christ through a training event centered on the gospel of Matthew.

A biblical foundation for mission from the Gospel of Matthew: lessons designed for pastors in Guatemala

Author
Eugenio Campos
Abstract
This project has to do with a course based on the gospel of Matthew and given to a group of pastors in Guatemala. Matthew was written to instruct the church in the teachings of Jesus and equip it to complete its task in the world. Therefore, this book has a missiological relevance to today's church. The author investigates the social context where the pastors study, specifies the theoretical bases of the course, and develops ten missionary lessons on Matthew. The project concludes by challenging the pastors and the church to get involved in missions.

A praxis for biblical catechesis: using a scriptural transinterpretation of the gospel attributed to Matthew

Author
Wayne A Robinson
Abstract
Using transinterpretation (a fictional narrative based on a factual milieu), research from two trips to the Middle East, and the database of The Jerusalem Post, the Wholly New Testament was created from the perspective of the Palestinians in the occupied territories. A four-chapter segment of Matthew was utilized in a five-week's Bible study project among Unitarian Universalists, with the intent of determining whether it would enhance appreciation for canonical scripture and sensitivity to the plight of an oppressed people. The study affirmed the hypotheses, though underscoring the need for longer sessions and series.

Developing biblical literacy in the local congregation

Author
Jim Sutherlin
Abstract
This project offers a definition of biblical literacy as the pre-hermeneutic which every interpreter brings to the text. The hypothesis upon which the project was based is that there is a direct relationship between the adequacy of one's pre-hermeneutic and the adequacy of one's interpretation of biblical texts. A course of study of the Gospel of Matthew was prepared and taught to members of a local congregation to test the validity of the hypothesis. Testing procedures were designed and administered to measure the results of the course and the degree of biblical literacy achieved. The report evaluates these results.
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