Methodist churches--Clergy

We got next: making room for young clergy leadership in the 21st century; how five young clergy have prepared for ministry

Author
Beryl M Whipple
Abstract
With the median age of church attendees declining but the median age of clergy becoming younger, what tools exist for younger clergy, below forty years old, to use in order to win the respect of their congregations which are significantly older than they are? Research from the author centered on interviews of five young clergy within the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church. The conclusion of this research is to evoke thought, dialogue and ultimately action that will illustrate how a young clergy person having a healthy relationship with a mentor has a better chance to excel in ministry.

Should I stay or should I go? A reflection on the practice of Christian discernment for United Methodist clergy

Author
Angela M Harris
Abstract
This project explores how the practice of discernment in the Christian tradition can be beneficial in making faithful and fruitful decisions. It reflects on the theology of discernment in the Christian tradition with particular emphasis on Ignatius of Loyola and the Quaker tradition, as well as in-depth interviews with United Methodist clergy on the practices of discernment that have been helpful to them over the course of their career with an emphasis on how to transition from positive placement settings. It concludes with a guide to assist clergy in matters of spiritual discernment.

I get by with a little help from my friends: clergy online groups

Author
Sarah L Calvert
Abstract
How can we use the tools of the 21st century to re-imagine traditional Wesleyan conferencing so that pastors who serve isolating appointments are still able to enjoy a healthy spiritual life? The author tested six different methods of creating clergy groups, searching for the most effective and simple to set up. Ideally, an in-person group brings the best results for accountability; however, online groups have much to offer in the relief of isolation. Suggestions are made as to how to effectively use this information to help clergy connect and move toward accountability and health.

Tapestry of health: for pastors of multiple point appointments and the congregations they serve

Author
S Karen Workman
Abstract
The author researched how narrative theology might play a part in creating health for both pastors and the multiple point appointments they serve. She was in dialogue with clergy of multiple point appointments and laity in their congregations. The author also used and exercise of sharing the church's story as a timeline of events to create space for storytelling to happen. While each church responded differently to the idea of this exercise, it was beneficial in each church to see how storytelling created community. The exercise also allowed each church to enter into God's greater story, which they are a part of.

The Order of Elders New York Annual Conference United Methodist Church: a case study

Author
Constance Y Pak
Abstract
According to the 1996 General Conference's mandate, the New York Annual Conference launched its Order of Elders in February, 2000. As the Chairperson of its Order, the author examined the question: how can the Order of Elders be a viable body which will increase the number of elders in its activities and nurture them spiritually? First the author explores the history of peer accountability and the creation of the Order of Elders based on the Wesleyan tradition and theology/doctrine. Then the author presents a case study from the author's own experiences. The results of the evaluation and analysis endeavor to execute a visioning process for the future growth of the Order of Elders of the NYAC.

Fire in our bones: clergywomen faithful to the divine call

Author
Donna Lynne Fowler-Marchant
Abstract
Fire in our bones: clergywomen faithful to the divine call addresses the theological underpinnings of call and ordination for clergywomen. The project-thesis examines challenges facing clergywomen, especially those serving their second or third appointment. Special attention is given to spiritual practices that nurture their vocation over the long haul. The paper suggests ways to encourage open communication between bishops, district superintendents, female pastors, and local congregations. The importance of support from denominational officials is highlighted. Ways for local churches to extend hospitality to female clergy and the need for female clergy to likewise extend hospitality are discussed.

A cry for leadership

Author
Bruce A Jones
Abstract
Leadership is a critical component of any organizational success and accomplishment. With effective leadership any human institution or organization can flourish and grow in the ways that organization deems important. Without effective leadership, organizations falter and decline, failing to accomplish their expected or hoped-for outcomes. This thesis will examine the leadership of the United Methodist Church from John Wesley and Francis Asbury to the present. The church's leadership applied in the past and in the present will be compared with the literature and theory of leadership in both business and church genres to assess the current state of the church. The conclusion will be a number of suggestions for ways to assure effective leadership in the church at all levels. This study also includes in-depth case studies of five congregations which have had long-term and consistent pastoral leadership.

The spiritual life and ministerial crises

Author
Todd H Benner
Abstract
A leading cause for pastors leaving the ministry is a weak spiritual life. As a result, their experience of ministerial crises are defeating. The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between ministerial crises and pastors' spiritual lives. The information was gathered from United Methodist pastors in Kentucky through an interview process. Findings revealed that those pastors who have a growing spiritual edge in their lives and ministry generally survive crises; whereas, pastors that do not struggle.

Auswertung pastoralen Dienstes in einer kleiner werdenden Kirche und mögliche Konsequenzen

Author
Thomas K Lessmann
Abstract
This project examines and evaluates ordained ministry in the Evangelische-Methodistische Kirche through detailed interviews with 10 pastors, in order to understand the decline of Methodism in Germany. Based on a historical analysis of German Methodism and a systematic reflection on evaluating ministry, the project questions these pastors about call, goals, and their daily work. The research discloses that the German Methodist church needs a structure of accountability with unifying goals and a systematic recovery of Methodist identity in ecclesiology and ministry.

Design and test a model for spiritual development using pre-Reformation traditions of spirituality among North Texas United Methodist clergy

Author
David J Twellman
Abstract
This project established that the spiritual development of a diverse group of mainline Protestant clergy can be enhanced by a program that includes the elements of pre-Reformation traditions of spirituality, and mutual accountability in a small group setting. An attitude/opinion survey on the personal spiritual development of clergy in the North Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church was conducted and analyzed, in conjunction with planning and carrying out a program of spiritual development with test groups and a control group to establish these conclusions.
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