Psychological tests

The creative self of the therapist: a study in self care

Author
Jennifer A Schiller
Abstract
Therapists may care for others to their own detriment, failing to recognize and provide for their own needs. Without sufficient care of self, therapists risk burn out, empathy overload, and an inability to continue in the profession. A particular problem exists for marriage and family therapy interns balancing academic studies, clinical practice and personal lives. This project explores intern therapist engagement in creative activities as a form of self-care and stress reduction. While self-report scales reflect the benefit of creative activities for self-care, more study is needed. Questions remain regarding the specific needs of intern therapists and the role of program leadership in providing a healthy model for self-care.

The impact of intergenerational parenting on the child bonding experience

Author
Cliffora L Wright
Abstract
the purpose of this project was to impact the intergenerational parenting skills of granparents through involvement in a two day retreat using formational prayer principles. The project curriculum was designed for the participants to identify root causes of woundedness, enhance their grandparenting skills, explore how they view themselves in their relationship with God and experience some measure of inner healing. The most prominent results were how our increased awareness of our relationship with God affects our self-image. Additionally intergenerational wounds affect parenting skillsandchild bonding. A Likert scale assessment tool,which included pre-test and post-test questionnaires were utilized.

Self discovery in Christ

Author
Heran Yoo
Abstract
The self is an eternal reality created by God in his image and likeness. The self cries out to be recognized and esteemed but is vulnerable to culture and the environment. When identity-development is stifled it sometimes builds an external identity to live vicariously. This project taught the creation narrative to South Korean women to help them realize that their identity is "Beloved of God." They have immeasurable value in spite of their inherent sinful inclinations. The translated TSCS-2 pre and posttests were statistically significant, suggesting that their self-identities experienced some healing and revitalization.

The couple checkup: evaluating a new marital enrichment intervention

Author
William D Meier
Abstract
Does Couple Checkup, an on-line marriage enrichment program, incrase marital satisfaction, communication, and conflict resolution for married couples? A twelve-week study of 189 couples from Park Community Church in Chicago, Illinois, comparing three groups: a self-directed group, consisting of 63 couples who did Couple Checkup on their own; a discussion group, consisting of 63 couples who did Couple Checkup and discussed with a small group; and a control group that did not do Couple Checkup. Paired t-tests were performed, comparing pretest to posttest ratings on the ENRICH COUPLE scale. Both groups that did Couple Checkup showed statistically significant improvement on marriage satisfaction, communication, and conflict resolution, whereas the control group did not.

The clergy project: self awareness and the Arno Profile System

Author
Elect Star
Abstract
This project seeks to explore whether or not the Arno profile System can enhance self-awareness that produces a positive effect in the lives and work of clergy, and if so, how it is expressed in relation to others, God and their ministry. This study presents perspectives on self-awareness, identifies instruments for self-awareness and elaborates on the history, research conclusions and the benefits of self-awareness using the Arno Profile System. A case study is presented to provide a report of the specific work with ten clergy and their responses to the Arno Profile System. Although the Arno Profile System report was helpful for pastors, as they claimed it did improve their self-awareness, the time period in which the participants were engaged in the project was not extensive enough to produced the desired results.

The effect of a gender roles seminar on marital satisfaction among Chinese Christian couples

Author
Wei Ling-Ju Lin
Abstract
This study examines the impact of a biblically based gender roles seminar on marital satisfaction among Chinese Christian couples in southern Taiwan. Pretest and posttest data from the Sex-Role Egalitarian Scale (SRES) and the Chinese Dyadic Adjustment Scale (C-DAS) indicated that the seminar was associated with an increase in mutual understanding and self awareness but was not correlated with the overall C-DAS score. Couple's gender ideology agreement and ministry compatibility are found to be correlated with the C-DAS score. Generalization is cautioned due to the non-probability sampling method used and its small sample size.

The effect of a parenting seminar based on attachment theory upon parental beliefs and expectations in the adolescent family

Author
Kevin E Skinner
Abstract
This study investigated the reduction of negative parental target-based and category-based beliefs and expectations in the adolescent family through a parenting seminar based on attachment theory. The seminar included instructional content to guide assigned parent-adolescent interactions and attachment experiences. A sample of 23 participants representing 18 family units attended six sessions over 11 weeks. The Stereotypes of Adolescence Scale (Buchanan & Holmbeck, 1998) was administered. Results showed statistically significant change in pre- and posttest scores for 7 of 10 subscales. Qualitative data gathered through participant feedback provided a means of triangulation in support of these results.

Shame reduction in sexually addicted men

Author
David Anthony Griffin
Abstract
The author hypothesized that a Twelve-Step program incorporating shame reduction techniques would reduce shame levels and the incidence of sexually addictive behavior in sexually addicted men. He used three shame reduction techniques -- psychoeducation, self-affirmation, and affirmation by others -- during a twelve-week study of 9 males participating in a church-based, Christ-centered Twelve-Step program. The Internalized Shame Scale measured a statistically significant reduction of shame levels, but the Test of Self-Conscious Affect-3 did not. The Sexuality Survey did not measure a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of sexually addictive behavior. Test results provided tentative, partial support for the author's hypothesis.

Sibling response to the disturbed child: fostering differentiation of self, boundary maintenance, balanced roles/power, and empathy to improve understanding of sibling relationships

Author
Larry J Watnemo
Abstract
Siblings do not understand sibling conflict. The author's thesis is that if siblings are taught to respond to a disturbed brother/sister through boundary maintenance, differentiation of self, balanced roles/power, and empathy, then understanding of sibling relationships will improve. This project integrated a biblical theology of brother/sister relationships with four family systems change constructs. A literature review critiqued systems theory and suggested that these constructs are compatible with scripture. Eight families participated in six therapy sessions from November 2004 through January 2006. Each family had one child between the ages of 10 to 18 with a DSM IV diagnosis. A pre-test/post-test research design utilizing the Brother-Sister Questionnaire (BSQ) measured the four family systems change constructs. Data from the Marginal Homogeneity Exact Test indicated that statistically significant change did occur among participating siblings, but no measurable change occurred among disturbed siblings or siblings' parents. An explanation of possible reasons for this is offered; however, data findings did support the author's hypothesis.

Increasing healthy self-esteem in youth at the Georgia Baptist Children's Homes and Family Ministries

Author
Barry F Reel
Abstract
This project proposes to increase self-esteem among youth residing in a selected cottage of Georgia Baptist Children's Homes and Family Ministries. First determining the self-esteem of the participants by administering the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI), the project then works with the youth in eight sessions to address their self-esteem as affected by their families, teachers, peers, and themselves. After these sessions the youth demonstrate an increase in self-esteem as measured by CSEI.
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