Interviewing

An account of our stewardship: assessing Christian character from a Wesleyan perspective in ministry candidates in the East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
Joseph T Burkhardt
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to discover the extent to which the interview process of District Committees on Ordained Ministry (dCOMs) in the East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church integrates historical Wesleyan marks of Christian character in the assessment of ministry candidates. The project design was to distribute an online survey to all East Ohio Conference dCOM members in February 2015. The project revealed that dCOMs regularly inquire of ministry candidates about their experience of conversion, and tend to prefer more subjective expressions of personal faith journeys over more traditional Wesleyan understandings of justification.

The role of the pastor in the process of developing ordained leadership

Author
James Daele Funyak
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to discover the role of the pastor in the process of developing ordained leadership in the church. The study followed a qualitative research method, utilizing semi-structured interviews with seven pastors, analyzed in a constant comparative method. The research explored volunteerism, leadership, and leadership development. This study concluded that pastors are uniquely engage in two aspects of the leadership development process: identifying and developing the role and function of the ordained leadership within their specific church and in identifying and developing individuals to fulfill the specific role and function of the ordained leadership within their church.

From pain to hope, healing and restoration in the lives of inmate's children

Author
Diane Hester Parrish
Abstract
In this project I construct a narrative context for the purpose of discerning what could be done to change the trajectory of inmate's children's lives from pain to hope, healing and restoration. Highlighted is the urgency of why intervention is necessary through the utilization of case studies. Throughout the project, field notes were collected. At the conclusion of camp, follow-up interviews were held re-addressing the pre-camp interviews to quantify strengths and weaknesses for the campers, custodial parents and volunteers. Comparing the pre and post camp data showed that this process of intervention was successful in restoring hope to these children.

The Great Commission to parents: disciplining our children

Author
Richard T Schwind
Abstract
The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of a four week focused training session on the Great Commission and implementation in disciplining children. The participants were eighteen parents and grandparents within New Community Church of St. Marys Ohio. Robert Coleman's eight principles in The Master Plan of Evangelism (selection, association, consecration, impartation, demonstration, delegation, supervision and reproduction) were the major focus of instruction and hands on week to week assignments. Results from pre- and post-project interviews showed apparent changes in the participants improved awareness and willingness to further their efforts in an intentional process of parental discipleship.

Considering the "word and communion" balance in Reformed Evangelical Presbyterian churches

Author
Phillip Sandifer
Abstract
This study explored the balancing of the preaching of the Word and the Sacrament of communion within Evangelical Presbyterian Churches. It asked if the historical/theological narrative mandated a balance, how is it reflected and whether the contemporary church seeks to implement such in its ongoing worship. A qualitative design, using semi-structured interviews with eight pastors and one worship director was implemented. The study concluded that the historical/theological narrative does encourage a Word and Communion balance but churches do not view this as mandated and are greatly affected by cultural obstacles and leadership preferences with regard to such implementation.

Me generation discipleship

Author
Yu Fen Wang
Abstract
By understanding the Me Generation's lifestyle, attitudes, ideas, and feelings, we can better fulfill the needs of the Me Generation and develop the disciple's relationship with God, self-image, spirituality and character, and commitment and obedience. Through research on discipleship training and the Me Generation and personal testimonies from my own congregation, this dissertation concludes that the Me Generation especially needs life coaches, mentors who walk with them, teach by example, and guide them as role models. Only through shepherding and training will believers become disciples and the key to discipleship training is to use one's life to influence another's.

Elements contributing to viable transitions from missionary to national pastor in evangelical church plants in Portugal

Author
Brian Daniel Dix
Abstract
On challenging phase of church planting is the transition from missionary church planter to national pastor. The goal of this study, which focused on the country of Portugal, was to discover how to make these transitions more viable. In order to achieve this, a qualitative methodology was designed which involved interviewing three individuals from each of five church plants who had observed such a transition over the previous five years. The interviews revealed practical suggestions, including early communication overlap time, sustainable and reproducible ministry, financial preparation, and deliberate dependency transfer.

Discovering the equippers among us: using behavioral based interviews for identifying, drawing out, and nurturing the equipping leaders of Ephesians 4:11

Author
Scott A Rees
Abstract
Thesis: We can identify Eph. 4:11 equippers by adapting behavioral interviewing methods. Method: A complete study of the five leaders of Eph. 4:11 identified biblically defined behaviors performed by each. Interviews with practitioners in each category (15 total interviews) found modern parallels of behavior. Behavioral questions were developed for use in interviews. The interviews were field tested and have proved to be functionally helpful to practitioners interested in identifying Eph. 4:11 servant leaders.

Redemptorist parish missions and models of the church: developing a process of pastoral interviews

Author
John G Kingsbury
Abstract
This project trains seminarians to understand models of the Church and then, through random interviews, identify these models present within a specific Roman Catholic parish. The project analyzes ecclesial models developed by Avery Dulles, Patrick Granfield, and Joseph Komonchak and applies them to parish models described by Jay Dolan. Work by John Lawyer and Neil Katz introduces creative listening skills for parish interviews. This research built the instruments through which Redemptorist mission teams can understand a particular parish.

Mobility in strategic missional development: a study of Tipp City and Monroe Township, Ohio

Author
Walter L Hensley
Abstract
This is a study of mobility as a multi-faceted phenomenon affecting church life in contemporary USA society. The central hypothesis is that residential mobility is a major factor affecting patterns of membership and participation in mainline Protestant churches that is neglected by theorists in evangelism and church growth. Data was secured through a community survey of the adult population of Tipp City and Monroe Township, Ohio, and in-depth interviews with a random stratified sample of that population. The result of this sampling, defining, and reflecting upon the multi-faceted mobility of contemporary US population is strong evidence that residential mobility has a major impact upon the growth pattern of mainline Protestant churches.
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