Education--Methods

Tracking a set of seminars to uncover African adult learning styles

Author
Raymond A Yoder
Abstract
From colonial times, the educational method used in schools and other formal educational settings in French-speaking, Sub-Saharan Africa was primarily the lecture. This research centered on the task of enhancing a specific seminar in French-speaking, Sub-Saharan Africa through non-formal methods. The research design uses content analysis, and incorporates interviews, questionnaires, as well as notes and observations of three generations of seminars to generate methods of instructing. These methods integrate models of orality, the traditional way that people in Africa learn, general adult education, and the teachings of Jesus. The research gives principles to enhance learning, ministry application, and teaching others in French-speaking Sub-Sahara.

The offering of corporate prayers of confession in the worship service

Author
Robert J Schwartzbeck
Abstract
In this qualitative study, the author posits the thesis that pastors should select or compose and offer corporate prayers of confession with much thought, sensitivity, and prayerful preparation. As a result of his interviews with pastors of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), the author shows that these prayers are useful for honoring the holy God of grace, for teaching congregations about the nature of God and their own nature, for teaching them how to approach God in humility and brokenness, in addition to protecting them from self-righteousness and promoting their participation in the worship service.

The indigenous practice of utu in addressing education and Christian-Muslim relations in Tanzania

Author
Bela B Kalumbete
Abstract
This project considers the African indigenous way of utu as has traditionally been applied prior to the coming of Islam and Christianity. With coming of the two religions, however, this practice was ignored and as such tension and conflicts between the followers of the two Abrahamic faiths ensued. The need to reclaim the indigenous practice and to be given its rightful place in the African society daily life, and specifically to be applied in resolving conflicts between Christian and Muslims in the country is of inestimable importance. Of the many issues of conflict that could be addressed using utu is the education system. Over the past centuries, the education system in Tanzania underwent extreme changes all of which left an impact on the people. It is the educational issue that has contributed to the collapse of Christian-Muslim in the country as each side justifies or blames the other because of what happened in the past, which has become a legacy of the present situation. The concept of utu tries to understand how the African education system worked and how the same idea of utu could shade light on the current education system and thereby resolve the conflict that emanates from this issue. Thus, the project looks at the efforts done by both Muslim and Christian organizations in dealing with the situation, not only in education but also in the totality of relationships. The main argument of utu in dealing with the situation in the country centers on the premise that an African Muslim and Christian is an African first and then a follower of his or her religion (Islam or Christianity.) To parallel the idea of utu the concept of Global Ethic as proposed by Hans Küng and others is used in order to bring to light what utu is all about both in local and global contexts.

A student manual and teaching supplement for the book Biblical preaching, by Dr. Haddon Robinson

Author
Robert A Permenter
Abstract
This thesis helps college level students apply the principles of the book Biblical Preaching, by Dr. Haddon Robinson. A Student Manual and a Teaching Supplement are provided to accomplish that task. Because Biblical Preaching is conceptual by nature, the principles can be difficult to remember and harder yet to apply for the typical minister. This thesis attempts to make those concepts easier for the student to remember and apply. It also provides teaching strategies and goals for the teacher. The thesis uses an indicative approach to teaching rather than a deductive approach. It also uses The Systematic Design of Instruction, by Walter Dick and Lou Carey, for teaching to offer exact goals and measurable objectives. While the thesis provides concrete activities to reinforce the principles in Biblical Preaching, it does not attempt to add new ideas or information to those principles.

Teach it again: using multiple intelligences in adult Christian education

Author
William C Hassel
Abstract
The foundation of this work is to use Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligence as the basic teaching strategy in teaching adult Christian education. Opening with the possibilities of Multiple Intelligences in the adult classroom, the second chapter examines how the MI theory functions within current materials. The third chapter develops a prototype Bible study specifically using MI theory. The fourth chapter is a critical self-evaluation of this project and what this project might add as a resource for the adult Christian education leader. The appendixes include the curriculum that uses all eight intelligences in individual classroom sessions.

A vacation Bible school curriculum with special emphasis on mission work in Kazakhstan

Author
Thomas A Baker
Abstract
This thesis demonstrates a specific technique in teaching a vacation Bible school for the purpose of increasing cognitive and affective learning. The technique developed uses the biblical distinction between old and new man. Questions are phrased to elicit "wrong" answers from the old man. As the students become more and more aware of the conflict within them, they begin to comprehend more fully why they think as they do. The themes of the lessons incorporate a mission theme with special emphasis on Kazakhstan.

The specific application and evaluation of andragogy in seminary

Author
Jonathan Rohrer
Abstract
Malcolm Knowles' theory of andragogy provides an alternative methodology for seminary that is effective in equipping seminarians in the necessary ministry competencies of theological reflection, cultural assessment, and ministry application. This ministry project surveys the foundational literature of andragogy, employs andragogy in a specific seminary setting, and evaluates the use of andragogy in seminary.

Male-female intimacy seminars: the evaluation of a didactic approach to cognitive, attitudinal and behavioral change

Author
William D Tallevast
Abstract
The research problem was to evaluate whether didactic educational method could elicit cognitive, attitudinal, and behavioral change of participants in a male-female intimacy seminar. Pre- and post-seminary questionnaires were used to measure increases in conceptual understanding as a result of the seminar. T-tests were applied. A post-seminar questionnaire was used to measure perceived commitment increase. These questionnaires were also evaluated to calculate percentage increases in self-awareness and perceived behavioral changes. Didactic educational method was shown to enable both conceptual and attitudinal change in a statistically significant way. Didactic educational method was not shown to enable behavioral change.

Islamic prison ministry: towards an effective chaplaincy at the Community Correctional Center (New Haven, Conn)

Author
James E Jones
Abstract
The project's central thesis is that Islamic prison ministry is more effective with a transient jail population if the facility's administration, corrections officers, and Islamic chaplain have a clear, concise, common knowledge base about Al-Islam's functioning in a penal setting. The primary method of study for this project was that of reflective participant-observer augmented by an extensive literature review in the areas of adult education, curriculum development, corrections, prison chaplaincy, Al-Islam Islamic education, the nation of Islam, and African-American Muslims. The cooperation received from all segments of Community Correctional Center (New Haven, Conn) indicated that the project's central thesis was sound.

Supervision of interns

Author
Wendell R Debner
Abstract
This project is a study of intern supervision in the context of a full-year penultimate internship program at a Lutheran seminary. The reflective method of Whitehead and Whitehead in their book, "Method in Ministry," provides the format and structure for the work. In the chapter dealing with tradition, the author portrays the history and development of internship among North American Lutheran theological educators. Under culture, the theory of cognitive dissonance and a systemic method of pastoral care are related to internship supervision. Under experience, the author probes his own history of field education supervision. The study results in several suggestions for field education programs and identifies significant trends in seminary field education programs.
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