Masculinity

A Christian Exploration of African American Masculinity

Author
Clarence Lanely
Abstract
A Christian Exploration of African American Masculinity examines the cultural complexities of masculinity by investigating manhood acts and how they are enacted by African American men in their quest to obtain masculine (patriarchal) power. Those with cultural power, mostly white men, deny power to white women, men and women of color. In this project, biblical, cultural and theological insights are explored that offer African American men a life giving and progressive masculinity. The incarnation of Christ offers an image of masculinity that frees men to follow Him, allowing men to be in relationships with others in intimate and meaningful ways.

A masculine spirituality: the life-transforming, gospel-centered discipleship of men

Author
Anthony G Myers
Abstract
Many men remain on the periphery of the life of the church. As goes the man, so goes the family, church, and nation. The problem of men remaining disengaged from the gospel has ramifications for men and Christ's church. This project recaptures a biblical view of masculinity. An overview and assessment of the effectiveness of several ministries is given. Men's ministry initiatives of the Presbyterian Church in America are presented with the purpose of developing life-transforming discipleship of men within local churches. The final outcome of the project is a four-session retreat for men focused upon "Recapturing a Masculine Spirituality."

Case studies evaluating the effectiveness of a Bible study program in influencing youth's masculinity

Author
Rodney D Stodghill
Abstract
The author researches three factors fathers need to raise biblical masculine sons: fear of God; father modeling the fear; and father teaching the fear. Men were surveyed to identify their father's masculine influence upon their moral behavior. Two case studies were developed to identify Restoring Authenticate Masculinity Bible study program effectiveness in restoring biblical masculinity. The author concluded that the fear of God was important to the development of the son's biblical masculine identity. The RAM Bible study program was significant in achieving the change.

The effects of the Cavetime Training Program upon the dissonance experienced by men between their beliefs and their behaviors in relation to their roles as men

Author
Jeffrey K Voth
Abstract
This thesis explored the effects of a men's discipleship program, designed by the researcher, on men at two churches. It was hypothesized that helping them see the difference between their beliefs and their behaviors in relation to their roles as men would develop a cognitive dissonance that would lead to a change in their behaviors. Five spiritual disciplines were identified in the lives of David and his mighty men and Jesus and his disciples and incorporated into the Cavetime Training Program (CTP). Dissonance levels were measured pre and post and suggested that the CTP positively affected the participants' dissonance levels.

Why do so few young males of St Vincent and the Grenadines embrace Christianity?

Author
Bede Hadyn Marshall
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine how young Vincentian males view manhood and Christianity in order to understand why they may have difficulty becoming Christians. The study involved semi-structured interviews with fifteen male students of St. Vincent and the Grenadines Community College and a literature review of attempts to explain the relative lack of men in the church and of material with particular relevance to the Caribbean. The research questions were designed to elicit views on manhood, Christianity, and the impact of becoming a Christian on a male. A composite description of a real man, according to the respondents, is one who is strong, assertive, caring, calmly confident, hospitable, wise, loyal, self-reliant, not given to displays of emotion indicating distress, and able to attract women. Positive views of Christianity were that it is a personal relationship with Jesus Christ; that it give a sense of belonging; that it upholds sound moral values; and that it has a worldwide appeal. Pastors were viewed positively as hospitable, moral, and skilled in communicating the Christian message. Christianity was viewed negatively as too restrictive, having unattainable standards, hypocritical, bigoted, and prone to divisiveness. A minority saw pastors as con men and leaders who do not set a good example. Most respondents saw major changes taking place in their lives taking place if they became Christians, with a larger number focusing on new obligations/restrictions and a smaller number on new benefits. Respondents were more or less evenly divided between encouragement and caution in their reaction to a best friend's decision to become a Christian. Finally, they claimed that young men were reluctant to become Christians because they saw negative consequences such as being linked to the female world; loss of freedom to do what they really like to do, e.g., engage in premarital sex; and loss of friends, especially through refusal to participate in gang activities. The study concluded that the most significant factors contributing to the difficulty young males have in becoming Christians seem to be those involving a clash between Christianity and culturally constructed views of manhood. Engaging in premarital sex and participating in gang activities are both marks of manhood in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and both are incompatible with Christianity. In comparison with a young female who is also considering becoming a Christian, a young male has one additional hurdle to clear: the apparent loss of, or inability to establish, his manhood. This may help explain why fewer young males than young females tend to identify with Christianity.

Understanding and developing biblical manhood

Author
Randall E Odom
Abstract
The paper explores some of the primary contemporary perspectives regarding the essence of manhood. In doing so, the paper seeks to identify the primary secular perspectives as well as the professedly Christian perspectives on manhood in order to give the reader a sense of contemporary society's thinking. It also traces the development of American manhood from the time of the colonial era to the present day, and also explores the biblical and theological teaching on the subject of manhood.

The transformation of church leadership through an understanding of biblical maleness

Author
Robert G Decker
Abstract
Biblical maleness, properly defined, teaches that men and women are created as equals, but with different gender-defined roles. Men are designed and equipped to lead the family and the church. Women are to actively help and submit to the man's leadership. This understanding has been the central tradition of the church for the first 1800 years of her existence and has only been challenged in recent centuries. The uniqueness of this project serves to illustrate the consequences that result when men fail to lead by way of three selected biblical narratives from Genesis. The passages are each grammatically and thematically tied by the phrase "listening to the voice of" or "obeying the voice of". For example, the Adam is cursed, not only because he ate the fruit, but because he "listened to the voice of his wife" (Gen. 3:17). This failed leadership continues to plague men's efforts through two male/female narratives in Genesis (Gen. 16:1-6; Gen. 27:1-44).

Promoting mature masculinity

Author
T Anthony Spearman
Abstract
This project addressed the silence in the black church on issues of sexuality and spirituality. Six two-hour sessions of instruction on the attitudes about masculinity were implemented with six pre-adolescent males. By engaging the use of a pre/post test with experimental and control groups, unstructured observation, follow-up interviews, and a summary of learning after each session, the qualitative research design found that there were shifts to a more mature understanding of masculinity in the participants. The behavioral and attitudinal changes in the participants also showed spiritual growth.
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