African American men

A Christian Exploration of African American Masculinity

Author
Clarence Lanely
Abstract
A Christian Exploration of African American Masculinity examines the cultural complexities of masculinity by investigating manhood acts and how they are enacted by African American men in their quest to obtain masculine (patriarchal) power. Those with cultural power, mostly white men, deny power to white women, men and women of color. In this project, biblical, cultural and theological insights are explored that offer African American men a life giving and progressive masculinity. The incarnation of Christ offers an image of masculinity that frees men to follow Him, allowing men to be in relationships with others in intimate and meaningful ways.

Identifying the major issues that have led to the decline in numbers of African American males in churches in west Philadelphia

Author
Paul B Cofer
Abstract
The problem this project addressed was a need to retain African American males in churches in West Philadelphia. Qualitative research in grounded theory was the method used to gather, analyze and interpret the data. The weft QDA software was used to organize and analyze the data. Some of the issues identified: the family, single parents, fatherlessness and the church. Five key solutions were developed: relationship wiith God, restoring identity, restoring the family, restoring the church and transforming the culture.

The doors of the church are re-opened: identifying socio-theological clues for helping African American men 30-40 years old back to the church

Author
Arthur R White
Abstract
African American men are in significant decline in the African American church. The researcher engaged the qualitative research design methods of descriptive survey questionnaires and group interviews in order to identify possible socio-theological reasons. The study included three groups of ten African American men: one group was African American men, 30-40 years old, who never attended church except for childhood exposures; another was a group of African American men, 30-40 years old, who attended church but stopped within the last ten years; and the third group was African American men who stayed in church over the last forty to fifty years. The results were analyzed by content and comparative content analysis as well as cross referenced with previous research results from church theologians and social science scholars. The socio-theological reasons identified are: a felt tension in his ontology related to stress on/from familial and ecclesiastical relationships and from the effect of urbanicity and region on his ontological, familial and ecclesiastical relationships. Additional church needs to be done on each of these socio-theological clues.

Men-to-men: telling stories beseeching Christian men to make a difference

Author
Ethel Cox Kato
Abstract
The focus of this project is the art of story telling as a therapeutic tool in the restoration of Black males to their patriarchal, leadership roles at the Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral in Jamaica, NY. The data triangulation method included surveys, a forum, and autobiographical narrative story telling. The findings included a congregation that needed to be mindful of the dire plight of males in their community as well as a call to assist them. The summary conclusion drawn included providing the art of story telling to outside communities and the ensuing development of training programs.

Discovering the influence of absent/distant fathering on the self-image of African-American men

Author
Reginald A Thomas
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to discover the influence that absent/distant fathering has had upon the self-image of a select group of African-American men of Greater Gethsemane Missionary Baptist Church of Baltimore, Maryland. Thirty-four participants from Greater Gethsemane Missionary baptist Church responded to a qualitative and quantitative questionnaire measuring aspects of self-image. The results revealed that absent/distant fathering influenced their self-care and self-giving. Another significant finding was that the participants appeared to be unaware of the influence of fatherlessness on their own self-images, but very aware of how it affects other African-American men.

We shall walk together: training men for leadership in the Assemblies of the Emmanuel Church, Baltimore, Maryland

Author
Durant K Harvin
Abstract
It is the contention of the project director that if there is to be a viable balance of male and female leadership in the African-American church for generations to come the church must be intentional to train and mentor men for leadership with the same veracity of commitment given to the inclusion of women. To do otherwise would make the African-American church an accessory after the fact in the plight of African-American men in general, African-American Christian men in particular. The project identifies helpful means to this end utilizing standard research practices and educational praxis.

Developing a ministry team to disciple young African American men in prison in the Atlanta area, Greenforest Community Baptist Church, Decatur, Georgia

Author
Kenneth L Ellis
Abstract
This research project examined the development of a ministry team to disciple young African American men in prison. The project drew its focus on a ten-week training seminar and a five-week in-prison disciple-making program to inmates. Statistical analysis revealed that the ministry team was effective in discipling the men. Chapter 1 gave an introduction to the goals and purpose for the project. Chapter 2 addressed the biblical and theological issues surrounding the challenges of disciple-making. Chapter 3 set forth a paradigm for establishing a ministry team to disciple inmates.

A strategy for evangelizing black men at Harmony Missionary Baptist Church, Lakeland, Florida

Author
Steve A Caudle
Abstract
This project endeavored to develop a strategy to evangelize black men at the Harmony Missionary Baptist Church of Lakeland, Florida. The strategy emerged from research that included interviews, extant literature, and observation of the Nation of Islam that uncovered those factors that contribute to black male aversion to church. The project concluded that the primary deterrent to black male church participation was the failure of the black church to develop and implement outreach strategies. From this and other discoveries a strategy to reach black men for Christ was developed.

Developing an effective men's ministry for the First Gethsemane Baptist Church in Louisville, Kentucky

Author
Dorrian A Hinsey
Abstract
Chapter 1 includes information on the location of the ministry project. Chapter 2 focuses on the significance of men and their relationship with God. Chapter 3 examines areas in society that impact the lives of African American men. Chapter 4 gives an overview of the five large group and focus group sessions in the ministry project. In the concluding chapter, the author concluded that the ministry project was successful and that it did bring about a more effective men's ministry.
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