Art and religion

Reconsidering Calvin Bringing the Arts into Reformed Worship

Author
Amy W Parker
Abstract
Reformer John Calvin is widely considered to be the epitome of the "anti-art in worship" Reformers, yet when his writings and work in Geneva were revisited by the author, five principles of a Reformed liturgical aesthetic became discernable: liturgical art should be biblically based, in the vernacular/contextual, and participatory; it should embody simplicity, and should avoid images of the divine. Applying these principles and the practice of worship curation, the author led the staff and members at Village Chapel Presbyterian Church in planning two seasonal series that intentionally integrated various arts into their traditional Reformed worship services.

Peace Through Understanding: Using the Arts to Sow Seeds of Compassion in Salisbury, CT

Author
Diane Monti-Cantania
Abstract
Peace Through Understanding is a multi-faceted, congregation-based project designed to promote multicultural awareness of different religions and cultures through the use of facilitated dialogue, music, literature, art and poetry. The experiential nature of the program was designed to sow seeds of curiosity about difference by showcasing the often- overlooked artistic heritage of each culture. The project included: Three scholar-facilitated discussions followed by a musical concert showcasing music of the culture; Each participant received a booklet highlighting the history, art and poetry of the culture; Acceptance by the congregation of a Welcome Statement declaring the church to be open and affirming.

Impacting the spirituality of select members of the Holland United Methodist Church through artistic endeavors

Author
Robert Wallace Zimmerman
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to impact the spirituality of select members of the Holland United Methodist Church, Holland, New York through artistic endeavors. The degree of increase in the area of spirituality within the group was measured by two assessment surveys -- a pre-project survey and a post-project survey. The project culminated with the submission of art projects created by the participants through assistance of spiritual disciplines. The most prominent finding was that participants recognized the God moments in their lives. The second most prominent finding was that participants recognized the place of art in worship.

New LEAF: an arts and theology resource for older adults

Author
Karen F Williams
Abstract
The church needs a viable resource to assist older adults in the congregation to experience and connect their faith and the arts. The author created and tested four sessions of an arts and theology resource with an older adult ministry in a local church. The sessions centered on art, poetry, games, and drama and concluded with evaluative surveys from participants. Additionally, three participants completed an arts interview and the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale. These sessions revealed positive responses from participants, confirmed the need of the resource's existence, and shattered the myth that older adults are uninterested in experiencing something new.

Art as a means of grace: encountering God, growing spiritually and experiencing God through creativity

Author
Anne C Conover
Abstract
Art can be a means of grace, which can help human beings encounter God, grow spiritually, and experience community through the creation of visual art. The author conducted and facilitated sessions with three distinctly different groups. Each group gave positive testimony to the fact that through these creative visual art activities they encountered God, grew spiritually and experienced community within the group setting and through the activities.

Encountering God in the creative process: how to build an arts ministry in the local church

Author
Kyle M Dennis
Abstract
The creative process is a unique way of encountering God directly. The scriptural pattern for this process is seen in the metaphor of God's breath, which repeatedly "inspires" creation with new life. In order to explore this phenomenon, the author built an arts ministry within a local church with three branches: an art gallery with 3-5 exhibitions per year, a program of arts education with 3-5 offerings per year, and a regular practice of including the arts in worship in a variety of settings. Over 18 months, the members of the congregation learned to meet God through their own creativity.

Artful pastoral transitions

Author
Deborah R Fair
Abstract
The author researched the use of the arts to enhance pastoral transition into a new congregation. She created, facilitated, and participated in hands-on arts experiences for large and small groups of all ages. Each experience was designed to help the congregation get to know her, as the new pastor, and for her to come to know them. Through personal reflection and congregational survey the author concluded that the use of arts experiences that engage members and the new pastor in the open vulnerability of creating art together complements the relationship building processes necessary for a good pastoral transition.

Weaving life--Godde, redemption and beauty

Author
Julia Christine Weaver
Abstract
The objective of this work-of-art thesis was to create a body of art that embodies a redemptive, restorative quality, enter into a contemplative experience with scripture and thereby more deeply inform the work of art, share the art in several ministry contexts and begin to answer the question, how does beauty redeem? Nine woven garments were completed and have been shared in four ministry contexts. The author's understanding of redemption was expanded by liberation theologians. The beatitudes and fruit of the Spirit proved to be a strong foundation for the work of art. Beauty redeems.

An investigation into the effects of an art ministry on people with dementia

Author
Robert R Tyndall
Abstract
The researcher's focus was to perform an art ministry involving disabled adults who attend Adult Day Services at the Otterbein Retirement Community, Lebanon, Ohio. The goal was to improve the quality of "spiritual" life of the participants through a primary focus of "spiritual painting" accompanied by prayer, meditation, and Bible story reading. Most of the participants suffered from either or both mental and physical disability. Even though normal communication and activity participation was somewhat limited, meaningful qualitative and quantitative assessments were obtained. Results indicated positive trends in increased feelings of peace, joy, self-worth, focusing ability, pride and contentment for art participants.

Interim ministry meets art and theology: creative church transtitions through the arts

Author
Mary Frances Mason
Abstract
This thesis addresses the question, "What kind of educational method will equip intentional interim ministers to use art and theology in the interim congregation to facilitate a healthy process of transitioning between called pastors?" An experiential workshop approach was selected, planned, and implemented. The goal of this analysis is to initiate and promote the inclusion of artistic resources such as drama, visual arts, music, poetry, and nonverbal arts in the education and spiritual development of interim ministers.
Subscribe to Art and religion