Listening

Take care how you help others listen : sermon listening in an age of distraction

Author
Sebastian Y Kim
Abstract
Preachers are expected to preach engaging sermons, whereas hearers are expected to be passive during preaching. One of the most pernicious challenges of listening to sermons is distraction due to smartphone addiction. The purpose of this study is to examine how adult congregants of a local church engage in sermons amid distractions. The study employed qualitative research methods with fourteen adult congregants using semi-structured interviews analyzed with the constant comparative method. The research explored neurological, psychological and spiritual issues induced by digital technology. This study concluded that the church should be intentional about making disciples by having meaningful conversations with congregants.

Impact study equipping congregational leadership with skills to preempt explosive conflict

Author
Sue Marie Baskette
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to impact congregational leadership in a group from southeast Pennsylvania through participation in a six-week small group experience to equip them with skills to preempt explosive conflict. The assessment of the project included the administration of both a pre-test and a post-test questionnaire. The goal with the highest results revealed an increased awareness of listening as an active form of communication. Increased awareness as to the role active listening plays in achieving successful outcomes was also noted. Additionally, the interconnectivity of successful listening with a moderate level of self-awareness was realized.

Training Leaders for Growth in Humility and Listening Skills by Learning to Conduct a Large Group Process to Solve Problems that Impede Ministry

Author
Felix Gilbert
Abstract
This study investigated training leaders for growth in humility and listening skills by learning to conduct a large group process to solve problems that impede ministry. This project consisted of eleven training sessions and two weekend retreats used to teach biblical humility and the ability to listen by using the formula of the Real Time Strategic Change Method. Findings revealed that the participants grew in the virtue of humility while the change in listening skills were not statistical significant. This project provides the foundation to conduct the large process with the entire congregation using of the formula of the Real Time Strategic Change Method as a vehicle to gain perspective to solve problems in ministry.

Holy speaking/holy listening: engaging evangelistic energy in mainline New England churchgoers

Author
Katherine A Heichler
Abstract
"Holy Listening/Holy Speaking" addressed institutional decline and lack of evangelistic activity among mainline New England churchgoers. The project sought to equip participants to engage in spiritual conversation, access their experiences of faith, and elicit the spiritual stories of others, to foster community that yields spiritual growth and faith-sharing. The project was a course, too short to effect the kind of spiritual transformation that propels evangelism. More time is needed to address and overcome many churchgoers' resistance to faith-sharing, and help people adapt communication and conversation skills they use in other areas of their life to having spiritual conversations.

Pneumatology and proclamation: the role of the Holy Spirit in preaching and sermon listening

Author
Calvert W Reginald
Abstract
New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church is a Bible-based, Christ-centered church. However, the members did not have a working knowledge of the functions of the Holy Spirit in preaching and sermon listening. The praxis director initiated this praxis in an effort to increase the members' awareness of the functions of the Holy Spirit in preaching and sermon listening, and the benefits gained from understanding and articulating those functions. Several topics on the role of the Holy Spirit are addressed in this praxis: hermeneutics, illumination, proclamation, aurality, transformation, and sanctification.

A study of critical care nurses' listening behavior through the application of the quality listening model

Author
D Clare Biedenharn
Abstract
Listening is a quality indicator in patient-centered care. Working within the paradigm of the Quaker listening model, as described by activist and educator Parker J. palmer and others, the intentional use of a spiritually based therapeutic listening model is an effective tool used by the Registered Nurse (RN) in working with patients and their families in making decisions in critical care settings. This project seeks to gauge the outcome of intentional use of this model by the RN as both a tool for improving patient care as well as personal spiritual awareness measured through the Daily Religious Experience Scale.

From hospitality to reconciliation: a way to move forward in dialog among Jewish, Muslim and Christian people

Author
Keith L Marsden
Abstract
The author tested the thesis that, through dialog with people of the three faith traditions of Abraham, the meta-value of hospitality allows for the emergence of hope, the practice of humility, and the application of wisdom, providing a way to increased reconciliation in an interfaith setting that increases understanding and helps reduce destructive conflict. The method for study was based on group dynamics process, psychological principles of active listening, and group session analysis. Through dialog groups, it was found that destructive conflict and clash can be averted while promoting increased respect of self and others.

Blessing based spiritual nurture: holy listening with prayer, scripture, story, and people as a foundation for confirmation

Author
Barbara D Van Doren
Abstract
Blessing based spiritual nurture, including sacred space, Sabbath, hospitality, prayer manipulatives, accompaniment, blessing, holy listening, and story, was incorporated into two confirmation classes at Parkview United Methodist Church in Miamisburg, Ohio. Holy listening, in verbal and contemplative prayer, scripture, faith stories, and personal interaction, was studied through qualitative data collected from the youth. Confirmation content (scriptural, historical, denominational and congregational) became stories which were part of the teens' own spiritual journey and story as they confirmed their baptism. Foundational study of holy listening and story supported the model, which helped connect the youth to God, the congregation and each other.

Godbearing in practice: developing spiritual midwifery through listening-based evangelism

Author
Anna Crews Camphouse
Abstract
This project formed a small group seeking to help persons to heal the brokenness of self and others by learning how to better listen to God, themselves, and others, based on the Howard Clinebell growth-group model. Participants were guided through a process of learning to develop skills for listening to God, self and others. Listening to God is based on prayer in the style taught by Father Thomas Keating. Guided spiritual autobiography is used to help members better listen to one's own life experiences and one another's. Participants are taught basic empathic listening skills and encouraged to show God's love to others, developing Godbearing within group members. The Godbearing concept is based upon Elaine Robinson's book of the same name. The process develops Godbearing as a model for listening-based evangelism. It focuses on the diversity of others and forming genuine relationships. It is not one of conversion, but listening to what God is already doing in the faith life of the person. The same principle is also used when listening to the world, seeking to transform the world to a just and loving place.

Hospital preaching as informed by bedside listening

Author
Cajetan N Ihewulezi
Abstract
Having worked as a pastor of a church and as a hospital chaplain for many years, the author had discovered that more intentional hospital bedside listening to the stories and experiences of the sick is very necessary for effective hospital preaching to the hospital community. The patient's stories and experiences are valuable resource materials that can be utilized in the preparation and delivery of more effective homilies to the hospital community. In most churches, Sunday homilies do not effectively address the problems of the sick. Most Sunday homilies address the moral, social, economic, and political problems of the healthy members of the churches. This thesis is aimed at improving pastoral care ministry of the sick. This pastoral approach will provide a homiletical guide for preachers, pastors, and chaplains involved in hospital, hospice, and nursing home ministries. In order to test whether the integration of patients' stories in sermons makes a difference in how preaching is received by patients in a hospital setting, three homilies without patients' stories and three with patients' stories were preached to patients. The method of testing was with questionnaires designed to provide opportunities to patients to express how they felt about the homilies. Apart from using questionnaires, face-to-face conversations between the pastoral minister and patients were also provided. The responses of patients clearly indicated the importance of including patients' stories and experiences in hospital preaching and affirmed the author's observation that applying patients' stories and experiences in homilies make preaching to the hospital community more effective.
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