Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Using a relief map of the Holy Land in adult biblical education

Author
William P Sanders
Abstract
This project proposes a geographical and audiovisual learning approach to adult biblical education, using a three-dimensional relief map of the Holy Land in a six-week unit on "The Life and Land of Jesus Based on the Gospel of Luke." Drawing on biblical, educational, cartographical, and historical-geographical research, and evaluated by written instruments and oral interviews, the project demonstrates that presenting biblical materials in combination with a relief map provides an understandable, interesting, and stimulating approach to biblical education for adults.

A legacy of loyalty and love: remarriage after the death of a spouse/parent

Author
Martha Jackson Oppeneer
Abstract
This project investigates and identifies ways in which remarriage after the death of a spouse/parent differs from remarriage following divorce. Drawing on Murray Bowen's family systems theory, life-cycle theory, and the role of rituals in facilitating life-cycle transitions, the project finds three significant differences between remarriage after death and remarriage after divorce: families in the study report higher levels of integration; deceased spouses continue to play roles in the emotional lives of these families; strong relationships with all family networks are maintained.

The voices among us: an exploration of the meaning and practice of ministry for ordained Southern Baptist clergywomen

Author
Dena G Mainord
Abstract
This project explores the experience of six ordained Southern Baptist clergywomen in order to identify the psychological effects of their time in ministry, to share in their personal, social, and spiritual resources, and to foster increased awareness, understanding, and support. These conversations draw on the literature of psychological development among women, the history of women in Southern Baptist ministry, and the meaning of ministry among Southern Baptists.

The Enneagram: a resource for spiritual diagnosis in the helping professions

Author
Michael A Lippard
Abstract
This project investigates the usefulness of the Enneagram as resource for ministry in a workshop for ministers and other helping professionals. As a personality typology founded on the psychodynamics of sin in nine different self-presentations, the Enneagram can be used with a theologically based phenomenology and it identifies a direction for continued spiritual growth for each type. Workshop participants find the Enneagram useful in addressing issues of spirituality and increasing self-understanding and insight, but its usefulness in revealing and explaining sin is more limited. Group work with the Enneagram proves especially valuable.

Developing a campus ministry through baptism in a Korean Methodist school

Author
Won Yong Lee
Abstract
This project proposes that baptism is the door to the church and commitment to christ for Korean students, testing that thesis with three sermons and four teaching sessions on baptism and Christian discipleship for 1,061 students in two Korean Methodist high schools. The project leads 945 students to be baptized in local churches, affirming their faith and discipleship.

The effect of gender shifts in the image of God on male self-image

Author
Kathleen Weaver Kurtz
Abstract
This project proposes that men who experience significant gender shifts in the image of God will also experience positive changes in self-image that lead to greater self-esteem and more positive ways of relating to others. The project conducts a group interview and individual, in-depth interviews with four men whose experiences with female/feminine images of God move them toward more positive self-concepts. Drawing on the work of Sallie McFague, the project explores use of inclusive images of God from a feminist perspective.

Mourning, memory/meaning, and moving on: a loss and grief seminar for high school youth

Author
Leonard L King
Abstract
This project seeks to help grieving teenagers to discover a holistic approach to life through two seminars, one conducted in a local high school and the other in a local church. Through biblical perspectives on blessing, honor, shame, and loss, particularly in the experience of King Saul, the project guides participants to identify and confront the influence of shame and dishonor during and after a loss. Signs of shame and dishonor manifested during the study are disguised by feelings of worthlessness, failure, embarrassment, and inferiority. Teenagers need to feel loved and accepted during a loss and to be welcomed into the faith community.

The near-death experience phenomenon in women: aftereffects, anxiety, and integration, with implications for pastoral care

Author
Maria J Kennedy
Abstract
This project seeks reasons why near-death experiences as spiritually transformative processes manifest themselves not as journeys of spiritual emergence but rather as spiritual emergencies. Is it fear or anxiety--or some other variable--that impedes spiritual and personal integration in the aftermath of such experiences? The project concludes that a significant correlational relationship appears to exist between "integrative" and "disintegrative" spiritual emergence phenomena and individual responses of fear or anxiety. The dynamics of that relationship are complex.

A step toward demonstrating a model for the therapeutic use of creative/expressive body movement in pastoral counseling and psychotherapy

Author
Adele Decker Jones
Abstract
This project proposes to help four persons get in touch with the creative force that resides in every human being in a way that cognitive systems alone are unable to achieve, by teaching expressive body movement in individual, one-hour weekly sessions for a ten-week period. The body is a hologram of one's being. Movement is as natural as breathing to the human body and is an expression of the gracefulness of basic human nature. Creation-centered spirituality is the theological basis of the study.

Beyond joining to belonging: developing a program of nurture and incorporation in Greendale Community Church

Author
Ardyth Johnson-Kovacevich
Abstract
This project works with the Membership Committee of Greendale Community Church to develop an experiential model of welcome, nurture, and incoporation for newcomers in a New Member Class. The committee first explores the meaning of church membership based on an understanding of ekklesia and the body of Christ metaphor, a theology of discipleship related to baptism, and a systems view of the congregation, in order to design and lead the class. Intentional study and fellowship increase understanding and commitment to discipleship among members of the committee and, to a lesser degree, among members of the class.
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