Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Jesus Sat Down: Preaching Grace as Motivation Toward Redemptive Change

Author
Jon D Wymer
Abstract
Congregations sometimes fall short of making personal change and working for social change within their communities as robustly as their preachers think they should. Preaching grace can lead congregations, even those that may be theologically conservative, to be motivated as individuals and corporately to experience the type of transformation that comes from God which is representative of redemptive change. This work offers a model of preaching as the proclamation of good news that offers divine grace as the source of redemptive change in individuals and the community.

Shifting a small rural congregation's understanding of leadership

Author
Terry Hunt
Abstract
The Shifting a Small Rural Congregation's Understanding of Church Leadership project used the methodology of qualitative research through questionnaires designed to measure the leader's awareness of the qualities and characteristics of a leader. Most congregational leaders would come to an agreement that developing new leaders is a critical responsibility of the local church, yet some United Methodist Churches actually do not have an intentional process where leaders are being developed. The Day-Long Lay Leadership Retreat was expected to train the United Methodist Church Book of Discipline mandated Administrative Committees. This Retreat focused on the leader's job descriptions and responsibility to be trained, to train and entrust others with Christian service.

More than music: strengthening music ministry through small group fellowship rooted in love

Author
Patrick L Daymond
Abstract
Loving relationships are at the core of effective ministry and foundational for communal formation. This project, seeks to offer a model for congregations and their ministries to reclaim the call to biblical community through a theology of love. Using the music program as a microcosm of the larger situation of communal fragmentation at Memorial Presbyterian Church (MPC), the thesis of this project is that pray-centered, bible-based small group environments will be an effective means in fostering community creating a salubrious environment for effective ministry.

Stewardship: an epiphany!

Author
Sarah S Butter
Abstract
The author makes the biblical, theological, and liturgical case for the season of Epiphany as a faithful and effective liturgical home for the practice of stewardship campaigns in 21st century American Protestant congregations. She reviews historical and contemporary meanings and models of stewardship, emphasizing the contextual and adaptive nature of annual giving campaigns in churches. Her research explores her own experience and the experience of five early adopter congregations with the model. Her findings affirm the liturgical, Christological resonance of the model and its faithfulness and effectiveness. In addition, she points to its powerful potential for missional interpretation of stewardship.

Preaching To Effect Ministry Development

Author
Reginald Jones
Abstract
Participation in the church fluctuates at times creating a shortfall of volunteers. In this project, the author proposes that intentional and effective preaching can affect ministry development that results in greater involvement in church-sponsored ministries by members of the congregation. The purpose of this project is to explore preaching that engages the whole body of believers in a way that people hear and respond to the good news by participating in the life of the church.

Can a Theology of Table Bring Healing and Reconciliation in a Wounded African American Congregation

Author
Patricia A Efion
Abstract
Hurt, anger, and woundedness have long been present in church communities, causing divisions within the church for centuries. This project predicts that by studying the scriptures and the liturgy for Holy Communion church members will develop a theology of table defined as an understanding of Holy Communion that arises out of a profound vision of who Jesus is, his sacrifice for humanity and his commandment to come to the table in remembrance of him. It further predicts that putting that theology into action by hosting a meal for those with whom they are in conflict, healing and reconciliation will take place.

The effectiveness of a collaborative leadership style for lead associate pastors during the transition of the lead pastors a focus on the process of vision development

Author
Mi Hyeon Lee
Abstract
The Collaborative Leadership project testifies to the effectiveness of collaborative leadership during the transition of a new lead pastor. The project reflected the role of lead associate pastor during the transition time and involves lay people, lay leaders, and staff who participated in vision development meetings and listed to a sermon series on the church's need for a new vision. Measurement of the effectiveness of collaborative leadership involves pre- and post-strategy implementation surveys and semi-structured interviews. The research demonstrates that the collaborative leadership style helps the congregation develop ownership of the vision in the transition time and provides possibility to reach young adults in a multi-generational church.

Reclaiming evangelism Evaluating the Effect of Evangelism in Selected United Methodist Congregations on Fulfilling the Denominational Mission to Make Disciples

Author
Heather H Lear
Abstract
The author proposed that a holistic Wesleyan approach to evangelism, integrating apologetics, transformation, and missional engagement with one's community would enable churches to fulfill their mission of "making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world." Through surveys and interviews, this project assessed congregational practices in six local churches. The consistent missing practices to this holistic approach that emerged were: the inability to articulate one's faith, the lack of intentional space for people to practice faith-sharing, the disconnect between doing good things and engaging in God's mission, and congregations not connecting with their surrounding community.

Collaborative inquiry, laity in a local church and the biblical imperative to do justice

Author
Paul M Lisl
Abstract
The "Doing Justice" project uses the transformative pedagogy of collaborative inquiry to deepen the understanding and practice of the biblical imperative to do justice of laity in a local church. The project involves a five week scriptural based collaborative inquiry group. Measurement tools include field notes, interviews and archival documents. The research shows that collaborative inquiry's values of just and fair participation, repeated cycles of action and reflection through discourse and storytelling, and meaning making leading to transformation contribute to a deeper understanding and practice of the biblical imperative to do justice of laity in a local church.

Preaching for healing in the broken church

Author
Patrick W Schultz
Abstract
Preachers have the opportunity to express the healing grace of Jesus Christ and to bring about a state of wholeness as a beloved community in Christ within the church and surrounding community through preaching. This thesis presents a practical, theoretical and theological approach to preaching for healing in the broken church as a guide in moving toward restoration, renewal and revitalization in the corporate body of Christ. The process is useful in helping to move congregations toward healing in the wake of pastoral inadequacy and church brokenness by directing them to focus inwardly, upwardly and outwardly in their spiritual development.
Subscribe to Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary