Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Faithful response in church architecture

Author
Kenneth W Chalker
Abstract
This project claims that a faithful witness to Jesus Christ can be made by a local church through architecture. As a basis for this claim the theological response made by the ancient Hebrews in their temple design, the development of church buildings by the Christian communities in the first three centuries, and several contemporary church buildings are discussed. The method of doing theology through architecture used at lexington Church of the Cross is presented. This method enabled the congregation to use architecture as a faithful response and witness to Christ.

Spiritual injuries and substance abuse: implications for pastoral care

Author
Jack R Klugh
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between spiritual wounds and substance abuse in VA Medical Center substance abuse treatment patients. Patients were administered the Berg Computerized Spiritual Assessment (BCSA) and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression analysis using Spiritual Injury scores to predict addiction severity ratings. Results show associations between spiritual injuries and severity of alcohol ratings were strongest for psychological ratings. Injuries most strongly related to psychological ratings were "life has no meaning" and "worry about death." This study developed a practical pastoral theological framework in which clinical pastoral caregivers can articulate a scope of practice and identity. Particular attention was paid to articulating a theological anthropology that acknowledges a holistic nature of human experience.

A dialogue between Pauline perspectives on behavior and the cognitive-behavioral methods used in a children's social and emotional skills group program

Author
Brad W Schwall
Abstract
This research project provides a dialogue between Pauline perspectives on behavior and the cognitive-behavioral techniques used in a children's social skills group program. The project demonstrates the compatibility of cognitive-behavioral social skill instruction with pastoral counseling for children. The study quantitatively evaluates the program's effect on the child participants' social skills. The scores on the Social Kills rating System (American Guidance Service, Frank Greshem and Stephen Elliott, 1990) that the parents completed after the program increased from the scores on the scale taken before the program suggesting an upward trend in scores, but the results were statistically insignificant.

The use of metaphor in pastoral psychotherapy: a qualitative study of five pastoral counselors

Author
David J Ohrt
Abstract
This study involved a structured interview of five pastoral counselors in the Chicago area to discover how metaphor was used in their practice of pastoral counseling. The study was of exploratory and descriptive nature. The data was compared and important themes noted. The results of the interview were viewed through the lenses of Object Relations Development Psychology, Metaphorical Theology as developed by Sallie McFague, and the work in linguistics of Lakoff and Johnson. The study found that paying attention to client metaphors enhanced empathy, helped to ground the client, facilitated creativity, cultivated depth, and aided in the transformation of world-view and view of God.

The construction of a model of the temporalities of self-narratives

Author
Roger A Kruger
Abstract
Using an interactive approach between data, obtained from transcripts derived from faith-stage interviews, and theory, including Fowler's psychological constructivism, Fraser's temporal levels, and Ritschl's narrative theology, a model of self-narrative temporalities was constructed in which the complexity of temporality increases in accordance with the number of orienting relationships. The model proposes that at each self-narrative temporal level it is possible to distinguish qualitative differences in the distinctness of identity, the complexity of causality, the breadth of perspective, and the nature of efficacy. Each self-narrative temporality also is exemplified by characteristic divine symbols and the manner in which faith functions.

The Impact of Ritual on an Administrative Board's View of Apportionment Giving within the United Methodist Church

Author
Brian D Gilbert
Abstract
This project evaluated whether a ritual focused on apportionment giving would: (1) create an awareness within a congregation's Administrative Board of the individual missions supported by apportionments, (2) cause the Administrative Board to value the role apportionments play in the life of the church, and (3) develop confidence in the Annual Conference's ability to use apportionment dollars effectively. A pre-assessment survey was administered to the members of Princeton First United Methodist Church's Administrative Board to determine their awareness of missions supported by apportionments, the purpose of apportionments, and how effectively apportionments were used by the Northern Illinois Annual Conference. Then, a ritual of apportionment giving was implemented the first Sunday of each month, for three months, following Holy Communion. Subsequently, phone interviews and a post-assessment survey were administered to the Board to assess the impact of the apportionment ritual. The data showed a ritual of apportionment giving, used in the congregation's worshiping life, created a measurable positive change in the Administrative Board's (1) awareness of the individual missions supported by apportionments, (2) appreciation of the role apportionments play in the life of the church, and (3) confidence in the Annual Conference's ability to use apportionment dollars effectively.
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