Covenant Theological Seminary

Navy chaplains: cooperation and conflict in a pluralistic setting

Author
John A Carter
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to understand the challenges chaplains face as they work with others from differing faith groups in this religiously diverse yet secular military institution. The study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with seven senior active duty Navy chaplain corps leaders serving in the Pacific Northwest. The research found six broad categories of issues related to religious pluralism, and exposed how chaplains themselves have been transformed, how their relationships have been affected, and how their preaching, teaching, counseling and public prayers have been influenced as a result of the religiously diverse environment. The study concluded with takeaways for chaplains, prospective chaplains and non-chaplain supporters of military ministry.

Preaching the Word in and out of season: sustaining the lifelong preacher

Author
Daniel B Ying
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine how pastors can sustain expository preaching in long-term pastorates. The researcher utilized a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with nine pastors from various denominations. The study concluded that veteran expository preachers face three major challenges and identified the motivations and practices that contribute to sustaining a long term expository preaching ministry.

Effective leadership of pastoral staff teams

Author
Eric R Molicki
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how pastoral team members utilizing a team approach describe effective leadership practices within a team. An interpretive comparative qualitative case study method was used focusing on two well-regarded pastoral teams. The findings of this study showed a need for team leaders to have a clear understanding of the essential relational dynamics of teams, the irreducible complexity of those dynamics, and their biblical foundation from ecclesiology, trinitarian theology, and pneumatology. Best practices for team leaders were then discussed.

An East Africa team's response to the challenges of global interdependency working among the poor

Author
William C Yarbrough
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how a multicultural AIDS Care and Treatment team serving in East Africa understands global interdependence in their work among the poor. The study provides an opportunity to the Church, mission committees, and agencies to listen to and learn from the story of a team as it works with Scripture and available literature on dependency and interdependency in their efforts to live and work among the poor. This study is part of their journey. This study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with 10 members of the AIDS Care and Treatment team.

Christ-centered preaching in Hip Hop culture

Author
Thurman L Williams
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how pastors prepare and deliver Christ-centered sermons that address the "core concerns" of young African American males in an urban context. The assumption of this study was that a significant need and opportunity exists for the church in ministering to the young African American male demographic. This study focused on six pastors who are working with a significant number of young African American males in urban contexts. This study utilized a qualitative design conducting semi-structured interview as the primary source of data gathering.

Musical instruments and musicians in the worship of the Canadian Reformed Churches

Author
Theodore E Lodder
Abstract
In the Canadian Reformed Churches there is both a shortage of qualified organists and a growing number of musicians who play musical instruments other than the organ, resulting in much discussion and debate about which musical instruments are the most appropriate for worship. A lack of biblical awareness and leadership concerning music in worship, combined with limited or mediocre resources and training, cultural influences, and other factors, have contributed to the present situation. This study explores, analyzes, and critiques this situation on the basis of biblical-theological and confessionally Reformed principles, taking into consideration the historical, philosophical, practical, and pastoral factors related to musical instruments and musicians in worship.

Collaborative leadership

Author
David Krueger
Abstract
This study explores the benefits of collaborative leadership in a ministry context. Three research questions guide this study: (1) How do pastors utilize change initiatives to cultivate collaboration with their boards? (2) How do pastors utilize timing to cultivate collaboration with their boards? (3) How do pastors utilize timing to cultivate collaboration with their boards? The study utilizes a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with nine church leaders from three different churches of various size in the Midwest. The results of this study demonstrate that the primary initiators within churches are the senior pastors. Three primary conclusions are drawn from this study: (1) it is crucial to understand change as an ongoing process when cultivating a collaborative board and to help others embrace and understand this change; (2) conflict must be constantly handled as an opportunity to grow as leaders; (3) good timing and good ministry is about the pastor's ability to spend time building trust with fellow leaders.

Successfully working through conflict in marriage

Author
Santo Garofalo
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to understand how couples in healthy, lasting marriages worked through conflict in such a way that it strengthened rather than damaged the marital relationship. The study was comprised of interviews of couples who have been married for twenty-five years or longer. This study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with seven Christian couples. The study revealed that these couples work through conflict respectfully and gently. They convey acceptance and respect in the midst of working through disagreements. They also affirmed the importance of forgiveness, humor, sacrifice, and the like in their relationships.

Leading adaptive change in a Korean cultural context

Author
J Kukhun Lee
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to show that the Korean cultural context was an important factor in understanding how Korean pastors led adaptive change. The author used the qualitative research method for this research. An analysis of the interviews with eight Korean pastors who led adaptive change concluded that Korean cultural traits did influence how congregations reacted to adaptive challenges and as a result, affected how pastors led the change. The conclusion was Korean pastors still were able to lead successive adaptive changes by using various necessary tools to navigate the web of enduring social relationships in considerable time.

Deep change: how the transformational learning theories of Mezirow and Loder apply to pastoral ministry

Author
Curtis J Young
Abstract
This study describes pastors' understanding of how transformational learning occurs among adults in their ministries. The study is based on qualitative research that included in-depth interviews with nine ministers in the Washington, DC area. It is supported by literature reviews related to transformational learning theory, a biblical case study from the life of Simon Peter, and findings from research that relate to pastoral ministry. Analysis revealed areas in which the ministers' understanding coincided with this theory. It also revealed gaps in their knowledge. The study concludes with ten recommendations to integrate the insights of transformational learning into ministerial practice.
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