Covenant Theological Seminary

"There's a gift in it" transplanted vocational ministers and the quest for belonging to Vancouver, British Columbia

Author
Michael N Hsu
Abstract
Vancouver, British Columbia has a reputation as one of the most desirable cities in the world to live, yet a recent study revealed it to be a city where people struggle to develop belonging. The purpose of this study was to explore how transplanted vocational ministers developed a sense of belonging to the city. The study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and the data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. The study revealed the importance of taking initiative in a place like Vancouver and that the difficult experience of dislocation offered a relational gift and opportunity for mission and service.

Pastors developing their congregants through nurturing leadership

Author
Jean-Jude Lors
Abstract
As the literature suggests, pastors, as church leaders, spend more time administering. Nurturing leadership is needed in order to develop and grow congregants. The purpose of this study was to investigate how senior pastors develop their congregants through nurturing leadership. Research questions: How do senior pastors develop their congregants in spiritual renewal, spiritual gifts? The challenges that they face and the benefits gain. Eight pastors were interviewed, using a qualitative semi-structured format, and data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. Using nurturing leadership pastors renew, transform, grow and develop their congregant spiritual gifts. Pastors also become effective leaders.

Discipling Christian C-level business executives

Author
Thomas Lutz
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how Christian C-level executives experienced an increased motivation to pursue spiritual maturity after gaining clarity about their kingdom purpose. This study was designed using applied qualitative research, specifically a case study of six men who participated in a discipleship group for nine months. All participants identified significant change in one of five areas: the understanding of kingdom purpose, of God's view of their work, of their view of their work, of spirituality, and finally of their engagement with their life plan.

Serving under the toxic leader practicing self-differentiation in the Christian organization

Author
Kelly Dehnert
Abstract
The literature has given little attention to the confusion and emotional trauma Christian employees experience because of conflict with harmful supervisors who profess faith in Jesus Christ. There is inadequate scholarship addressing conflict resolution within power structures in the Christian workplace. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore how employees of Christian organizations practice self-differentiation while interacting with toxic supervisors. The study utilized a qualitative design using semistructured interviews with nine current and former employees of Christian organizations. The study provided conclusions based on biblical literature, the social sciences, and leadership best practice.

A qualitative study examining how pastors learn emotional intelligence in their ministry leadership context

Author
Michael V Phillips
Abstract
Abstract: Research shows that pastors face difficult challenges in the course of leading congregations and often are not equipped to negotiate those challenges. While there may be numerous ways that pastors can prepare and learn to navigate these challenges, one essential skill, that the literature and interview data confirmed, is the development of emotional intelligence. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how pastors learn emotional intelligence in their ministry leadership context. The key identifiers for learning EQ were: mentoring, critical reflection, self-care, strong marriages and a robust desire to learn emotional intelligence.

Unleashing creativity in liturgy encouraging, equipping, and empowering artistic Christians in corporate worship

Author
David A Conley
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how church members use their creative talents in public worship. Many evangelical churches struggle to integrate fuller expressions of creativity and art into their worship spaces and services. Many artists in these congregations remain on the sidelines, and churches that persist in one-dimensional communication become less intelligible to the world. The study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with seven liturgical artists. It also surveyed literature from biblical material, art history, liturgical aesthetics, and creativity. It made recommendations to help churches encourage, equip and empower artistic Christians to use their imaginations in worship.

The language of the Lord's Supper the possible impact of Wittgenstein's philosophy of language on what pastors say when they adminster the Eucharist

Author
Cory C Kloth
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to review of historical formulation of eucharistic liturgy throughout the early church to modern American Presbyterian denominations, and to evaluate the possible impact that Wittgenstein's philosophy may have on future liturgical developments. While individuals may or may not have had exposure to Wittgensteinian philosophy, this study sought to evaluate their current eucharistic liturgical praxis to see what historical paradigm most influence their current formulations. Then, after such evaluations were made, to ask whether the contemporary Presbyterian church could benefit from implementing part of Wittgenstein's philosophy in future eucharistic formulations. Finally, the researcher sought to explore ways such implementation could happen in current eucharistic liturgical praxis.

Corporate worship as improving baptism practices toward the new identity of God's people

Author
Luke W Brodine
Abstract
Literature suggests that there is a fundamental connection between baptism and ongoing spiritual formation, and that pastors must recognize how practices impart understanding and shape identity. The purpose of this study was to explore how pastors' conduct of corporate worship services helps congregants connect the practice of baptism to the pursuit of spiritual formation. The study employed qualitative research methods and used a semi-structured protocol to interview six demographically diverse pastors. The study concluded that narrative is a key instrument uniting baptismal practice with identity formation, and that baptismal formation is fostered in the context of community and corporate worship.

Transformative preaching in Chinese churches

Author
Philip D Douglass
Abstract
The research explored how pastors preach, their spiritual formation and ethos that encourage transformation in the lives of listeners within Chinese churches. This study is composed of a qualitative design using a semi-structured approach to interview six experienced Chinese pastors. This study concludes that sound hermeneutics leads to sound homiletics. Spiritual formation consists of stringent spiritual disciplines and a required development of godly character within preachers. The message delivered by pastors needs to be clear, understandable and have the ability to connect to the Chinese culture in order to encourage transformation within the lives of listeners.

Emerging adult spiritual formation practicing faithfulness in fellows programs

Author
Chad H Donohoe
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how Fellows alumni describe the formative experiences of their Fellows Program. Three research questions guided this study: How do Fellows alumni describe the formative practices of the Fellows Program? How do Fellows alumni describe the impact of their Fellows Program? How do Fellows alumni describe the role of the local congregation in their Fellows Program? The study revealed no overall decline in the faith of emerging adults during college, highlighted factors influencing the increase or decline of their faith, and demonstrated that they need the cultivation of right loves.
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