Bethel Seminary (Saint Paul, Minn)

Reconciling the body: working toward ecclesial unity

Author
Brien J Aadland
Abstract
In this project the researcher studied the similarities and differences of the United Church of Christ and the Emerging church. The goal of this research is to see if these two faith streams are similar in thought or different. The researcher looked at important voices in Christianity to see what they say about the topics of reconciliation and unity. The researcher also looked at scripture references too. the researcher looked into voices in both faith streams and interviewed two pastors from each stream. The researcher found both of these faith streams are similar, and willing to work together.

Toward permanence addressing the need for accessible permarital care for deaf couples

Author
Peter Christopher Myers
Abstract
This project addressed the inaccessibility of premarital-care resources in the church for deaf couples whose first language in American Sign Language (ASL). Using case study methodology, ten deaf married couples were interviewed about their experiences with premarital care. Four central issues were addressed: the couple's attitudes toward premarital care; the perceived competency of the care provider; the process and approach(es) of premarital care that the couple received; and follow-up provided by the care provider. Major themes and resulting recommendations for ministry applications were offered.

A co-created incarnational missionlogy for evangelizing hip-hoppers

Author
Ferguson L Harris
Abstract
The project concluded that the gospel should be contextualized for unbelieving hip hoppers as exemplified by God's incarnational pursuit of sinful humanity. Phenomenology was the research methodology used which revealed that hip hoppers commonly experience (1) their ability to relate to hip hop artists; (2) the opportunity for self-expression; (3) the influence of the music on behavior and mood; and (4) the respect for authenticity on the part of the hip hop artist. This resulted in the following incarnational approach for contextualizing the gospel, Leaving and Leading, Listening and Learning and the critical analyzing and assessing of hip hop lyrics.

Negotiating the doing to being boundary in J. Robert Clinton's leadership emergence theory

Author
Charles W Sattgast
Abstract
Leaders often face a doing to being boundary that required a paradigm shift from finding meaning and fulfillment in achievement to ministry that flows out of being. This research project explored the nature and meaning of doing and being through biblical and literature research and utilized a grounded theory field study to examine the critical factors related to the doing to being boundary and transition. The researcher also proposed a graphical conceptual map of the doing to being boundary and developed a set of navigational aids to help leaders successfully negotiate this important transition.

The systemic integration of Kenyan immigrants into the American culture

Author
Yabesh N Maroko
Abstract
This project attempted to find strategies on how Kenyan immigrants in the American culture can smoothly integrate and help their children retain good Kenyan traditional values. The researcher employed case study method and analyzed relationship between identities and integration in the two cultures. The coming of Kenyan immigrants into this land calls for a reconfiguration of the ways in which they can be accommodated. This project synthesized and developed strategies that can be used to help them integrate into the American culture. Worshipping at Kenyan Community Church has brought Kenyans to fellowship together. Hosting various communal events has enhanced togetherness and retaining their culture.

Leadership development through theological education in the theological education initiative of Central Missouri

Author
April A Welch
Abstract
Access to leadership development through theological education is limited in places without seminaries. The theological education initiative of Central Missouri started the Emerging Church leadership Institute to fill that gap. Utilizing phenomenology, the researcher discovered the program's impact from the graduates. The field research determined the program accomplished its goals. the biblical/theological research unearthed a history of education for leadership development in non-traditional settings. Finally, academia argued for/against these types of educational settings. however, a new approach could be successful and, given the many positive results of ECLI, their model can be effective across a range of ministry settings.

Providing relevant and effective leadership for millennials

Author
Valorie C Nordbye
Abstract
This thesis surveyed the leadership style preference of Millennials. Other areas focused on their loyalty to bosses, the importance of a company's values and social practices, and their preferences about working independently of collaboratively. Members of an American college ministry were surveys using an online survey tool. Based on 261 surveys, 85 percent chose servant leadership as their preferred style. The majority indicated that the values and social practices of their employer were important to them and that they would leave a job to remain with a boss they liked. there was no clear preference on working collaboratively or independently.

Preaching as a cultural formation tool

Author
Jason P Esposito
Abstract
The problem addressed by this paper is a lack of awareness pastors have of the power their preaching has to shape church culture. In response to this problem the researcher explored the biblical foundations of preaching. he reviewed literature related to homiletics and communication with special attention to cultural formation in organizations. He conducted case studies by way of interviews to determine whether members of his church perceived this connection between preaching and cultural formation. From the thesis findings the researcher developed a set of nine communication principles to equip pastors to utilize the preaching craft as a culture creator.

A theology and practice for implementing pastoral care through community groups at Calvary Church

Author
Joshua P Mateer
Abstract
This project addressed the problem that exists for a Pastoral Care Department in a large church (over 4,000 attenders) to care for the needs of that congregation. The researcher studied the biblical and theological natures of care and community and their interconnectedness to each other. He used qualitative research to conduct case studies of Ada Bible Church and North Point Community Church to identify transferable principles. The researcher then developed an implementable strategy at Calvary Church, including structures, training, communication and record-keeping for the purpose of using small groups to facilitate care.

Exploring the principles behind effective collaborative ministry on multi-point charges in the Peninsula-Delaware Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
Drew Mitchell Christian
Abstract
As community issues become more complex, God calls His people to work together. God models collaboration through the Holy Trinity. Many in healthcare and education have discovered the benefits of collaboration. The researcher explored the principles behind effective collaborative ministry on multi-point charges in the Peninsula-Delaware Conference of the United Methodist Church. Case studies were conducted on three Untied Methodist Charges showing evidence of effective collaborative ministry and mission. The researcher gathered information through interviews with pastors and laity, multiple site-visits, church-produced documents, and open-ended questionnaires. Key elements for building effective collaborative relationships between multiple congregations were identified
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