Bethel Seminary (Saint Paul, Minn)

Advocacy for a biblical and communication based interpersonal competency course for seminary education

Author
Philip H Frazier
Abstract
Seminary communication education is deficient in teaching interpersonal, face to face, communicaiton. Quantitative analysis of communication courses from 59 seminaries found 569 persuasion based preaching and evangelism courses and only 14 interpersonal communication courses. Using six established interpersonal Communication Competencies and the Narrative Paradigm of Walter Fisher, the Prologue, and dialogues of Jesus in Chapters 9, 13 and 21 of the Gospel of John were analyzed. Interpersonal Competence and Narrative Coherence and Fidelity were established. A focus group of Master of Communication graduates demonstrated the efficacy and impact of an Interpersonal Masters course in personal and work settings.

Intrinsic motivation in identity development: a biblical approach to psychometric testing in a Canadian discipleship environment

Author
Bradley D Friesen
Abstract
The problem this project addressed was the ineffectiveness of self-measurement tools currently used for discipleship by Canadian discipleship and Bible colleges (CDBC) to guide their students toward self-identification for life development and planning. In response to this problem the researcher conducted an in-depth qualitative study of self-measurement tools in which he compared these tools to a biblical gauge for self-measurement. He then led ten undergraduate students through a semester-long discipleship program that centered on the tests that he deemed most appropriate. He measured the students' growth of self-knowledge and motivation over the duration of the semester.

Avoiding division within a church: a proactive approach for identifying sources of conflict and creating a healthy ministry environment

Author
Kenneth V Polley
Abstract
The research identified topics church interventionists address when assisting churches in the recovery process, primary sources of conflict based upon church experiences, and parallels between these two areas. Seven areas common among church interventionists were identified: acceptance of differences, unresolved corporate sin, church structure, ministry focus, leadership, communication, and accountability. The data were inconclusive in establishing a direct relationship between the seven identified areas and the onset of conflict. The research found surveyed churches shared common areas of deficiency: weak administrative structure, avoidance of differences, absence of ministry focus, and lack of leadership time focused upon development or spiritual development.

Chaplain, pastor, leader: a biographical study of leadership transitions in the life of Chaplain (Colonel) James E. Wright

Author
Brian P Wright
Abstract
This project is a biographical study of the transition of (Colonel) Chaplain James E. Wright from military chaplain to pastoral leader in civilian service. It examined the correlation between the pastoral leadership demonstrated by Chaplain Wright and established leadership expressions and patterns. This examination involved the review of many personal documents, review of his military record and interviews conducted with individuals from congregations he served as a civilian pastor. The project concluded that the vision, discipline, and counseling that were developed by his time as a military chaplain were employed with great effectiveness in his civilian ministry.

Rediscovering the urgency of intentional discipleship in the Naga churches in Nagaland

Author
Orenvungo Ngullie
Abstract
This research addressed the lack of intentional discipleship in the evangelical churches in Nagaland. In response, the researcher drew insights from the Great Commission (Matt. 28:19-20) highlighting the importance of discipleship as an intentional pursuit instead of an accidental venture. The literature review dealt with current and relevant issues within the Naga society. A mixed methods approach along with grounded theory was the research path. The research revealed that discipleship, although deemed important was not happening in most churches. The research attemped to disentangle the church from its tepid approach to discipleship, to a new sphere of intentional life-on-life discipleship.

Resiliency and self-care for pastors in Japan facing a disaster

Author
John Graham Houlette
Abstract
Resiliency and self-care for pastors in Japan facing a disaster was researched. In addition to surveying seminary students, pastors who experienced the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake as well as pastors who lived through the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and seminary professors who train next generation pastors were interviewed using co-inquiry and a 360-degree data gathering approach. Managing stress, loss, relationships, compassion fatigue and burnout were common challenges. Practicing resilient leadership entailed processing the relational reality of pain and suffering in the context of disaster ministry while exemplifying courage, emotional and cultural intelligence, Sabbath rhythms and mutual care.

A qualitative study of doubt in the evangelical tradition

Author
Benjamin B Young
Abstract
This project explord the difference between evangelicals who doubted and stayed in the evangelical faith and those who left the fold. Grounded theory was the primary research methodology and data was gathered from interviews with people who struggled with doubt. This data was used to develop a strategy for people going through doubt and for pastors helping others process doubt. Pastors need to provide a safe place to doubt by listening and being patient, and by waiting to see how God will work in the lives of the people who are struggling with doubt.

Factors that affect sustainability of transitional homes for sexually exploited women

Author
Ruth E de Guzman Dalman
Abstract
The study addressed the factors that prevent sustainability of transitional homes for sexually exploited women. Factors were isolated that contributed to the sustainability of such homes. This qualitative study included case studies of two sustainable and two non-sustainable homes. Workers from each home were interviewed with queries relating to how the home was organized, managed, assessed, and resources were received and utilized. Chief findings related to how sustainability was viewed throughout each home beginning with strategic planning, how it was organized, and functioned. Other findings revealed more elements from each home that played a role in affecting sustainability.

Exploring leader authority within the family system when implimenting organic leadership development

Author
Bruce M Sexton
Abstract
This study developed a theory regarding the level of anxiety in the church family system when implementing organic leadership development. The researcher analyzed three biblical leaders' developments while considering the effects on family system. To further develop a theory, relevant literature of leadership development and family systems was explored. A qualitative and quantitative, grounded theory study was conducted using surveys and interviews of church leaders participating in a retreat to develop personal vision and major role statements. The study resulted in a grounded theory for implementing organic leadership development in small churches that promotes healthy family systems.
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