Denver Seminary

Exploring the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral marital enrichment intervention to repair broken marital trust in Christian couples

Author
John D VanderKaay
Abstract
Will repairing marital trust increase marital satisfaction, commitment, and forgiveness in married couples? Due to broken trust in the relationship, many married couples are unable or unwilling to fully utilize even skills they already have to strengthen their marriage. If broken marital trust was fully repaired, not only would marital trust levels rise, but so would commitment and forgiveness. Through pretest, posttest, and follow-up tests during a small group intervention study, the researcher determined that trust was increased in the majority of couples. Due to limited sample size, no other statistically significant change was determined by the study.

Who I am in Christ: how increasing one's self-knowledge before God impacts relational isolation

Author
Doug J Friesen
Abstract
Results from the Who I am in Christ seminar, derived from the Who I am in Christ survey, supported the research hypothesis that increasing one's self-knowledge before God (SKBG), combined with experiences of self-disclosure including requesting feedback from one close friend, would decrease one's sense of relational isolation. This quasi-experimental exploratory project reinforced the claim that in Christ, identity and intimacy are intimately linked and are designed by God to mature together and that the 12 week process of interweaving content learned with self-discovery shared is an effective means of increasing SKBG and reducing relational isolation with God and others.

The effect of a spiritual formation program on perceived marital satisfaction

Author
Jeffrey D Granger
Abstract
This thesis researches whether a 12-week spiritual formation program for a group of ten to twelve married Christian couples will enhance their individual relationship with God and others, and therefore, increase perceived marital satisfaction. It outlines a model for spiritual formation centered on being conformed to the image of Christ. Theoretical support ties spirituality to marital satisfaction, and subjectification to love for God and others. Measures include the DAS, SWBS, and qualitative questionnaires. Results suggest this program was a positive influence on perceived marital satisfaction.

The fruit of humility and how pride spoils it

Author
Brian K Long
Abstract
This thesis proposed humility to be a foundational virtue capable of enhancing leadership effectiveness. The project studied the effect that a Christian humility cultivation experience might have on leaders' understanding and awareness of the amount of prideful attitudes they exhibit, versus their understanding of humility and the amount of humble attitudes they exhibit. Qualitative feedback gained during the humility cultivation experience, along with self-assessment data, formed a solid basis for evaluating the project's effectiveness. Taken together, results indicate participants clearly experienced heightened awareness of the poisonous effects of pride, arousing their desire to reduce pride by cultivating humility.

Called to care: training Christian caregivers for ministry alongside those with life-limiting illness

Author
Benjamin M Keller
Abstract
This project shares the results of the author's training program entitled Called to Care: a 10-week, 12-session pastoral care training program for clergy and lay caregivers that increased participants' perceived comfort in providing care to those who were chronically ill, near end of life, and actively dying. The training further reduced participants' fear of death and increased beneficial styles and types of death acceptance as measured by the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R). The program featured existential growth opportunities through group discussion, a daily reflection journal, and other reflection exercises and skills development via lecture, video, role-play, practical visitation experiences, and multimedia.

The effect of an adopted and integrated PAUSE-biblical-negotiation process on disputable matters concerning a shared Sabbath morning worship service

Author
Jonathan P Michael
Abstract
This thesis follows a case study design and explores the effect of an adapted and integrated PAUSE-biblical-negotiation process using principles from Peacemaker Ministries to address disputable matters concerning a shared Sabbath morning worship service at the Mount Pisgah Academy Seventh-day Adventist Church. The researcher used biblical principles from Romans 14-16 to address the root problems of judging and despising. Though the church did not arrive at a loving corporate resolution within the three months of the project, the process helped to open communication and clarify the issues, positions, and underlying interests concerning the two disputable matters of drums and reverence/irreverence in the sanctuary.

The impact of attachment to God and resilience in an Adult Third Culture Kid (ATCK) after experiencing the separation loss event of leaving home

Author
Gilbert L Kinch
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis was to investigate whether an Adult Third Culture Kid's (ATCK's) attachment to God was based on their faith and their resilience level was associated with the type of grief process experienced after transition back into the passport culture. This grief was experienced after leaving home in their host country from the loss produced by the unavailability of attachments that anchored their lives. The primary focus of the study was to determine whether or not there were correlations between attachment to God, resilience, and grief. This research, using correlation analysis supported the hypothesis that there are correlations.

Emotional intelligence and its impact on managing relationships: a study for Greater Europe's Mission leadership team in personal and professional spheres

Author
Henry L Deneen
Abstract
Emotional intelligence (EI) is a soft skill often overlooked but critically important. Understanding blind spots, amygdala hijacks, feedback, and self-awareness is key to growth in personal and professional relationships. A three-month training module, including the MSCEIT and personal x-rays, resulted in EI growth among GEM's leadership team. Questions addressed include how to be more self-aware; how to give/receive feedback; understanding big assumptions or hidden competing commitments that prevent EI growth; and how to most effectively lead others by modeling high relational skills. EI growth is achievable and vital in the twenty-first century.

The effectiveness of a rule of life as growth processing framework in the development of New Zealand evangelical church leaders' spiritual discipline behaviors

Author
John C Douglas
Abstract
This thesis investigated the effectiveness of social cognitive theory to guide interventional engagement with the rule of life model. The project's research purpose was to increase congruence of professed intention and behavioral engagement in reported practice of self-chosen spiritual disciplines by ministry leaders within New Zealand evangelical churches. The researcher's biblical, theological, historical, and applied developmental theory investigations significantly shaped the twelve-week seminar's design and delivery. Seminar related data, assessment and measurement gathered through pre- and posttesting and structured post-seminar interviewing were triangulated. In its reporting significant findings, effectiveness, and implications are summarized under the categorizations of statistically, quantitatively, and qualitatively significant results.

The effect of a training program on pastoral leadership intentionality as identified in the letter of First Timothy

Author
Nathan L Yoder
Abstract
This project measured the effect of a training program on pastoral leaders' sense of intentionality with regard to the leadership themes identified in First Timothy. The six-session program (including group instruction and discussion, a six-part fable, and reflection questions) was based upon leadership behaviors described in First Timothy. Eight pastoral staff participated in the three-month program and were pretested and posttested using both quantitative and qualitative measurements. The results were statistically insignificant with regard to behavioral change. Key lessons were identified for future uses of the training program.
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