Denver Seminary

The impact of mindfulness practice and group leadership training on identification with stereotypic sex role attributes in Christian leadership groups

Author
Nicole S Oliver Snyder
Abstract
The aim of this study was to demonstrate that as mindfulness attention and greater acceptance of members in leadership groups increase, members will identify to a greater degree with androgynous personality characteristics. Participants took part in a fourteen-week mindfulness attention skills training group discernment practice program. A mixed-methods approach was used (quantitative measures and phenomenological qualitative inquiry). A paired-samples t-test determined that no statistically significant change occurred in sex-role identification in the posttest. Pretest-posttest focus group interviews, however, indicated notable change in expectations of leadership toward androgynous qualities (e.g., descriptions such as: shared leadership, collaboration, listening, and attentive to the other).

The Effect on a Select Group of Beltsville SDA Church Members of a Twelve Week Program on the Attitude and Expression of Gratitude to Develop the Habit of Focusing on Gratitude Instead of the Negative

Author
Will Johns
Abstract
This study focused on a twelve-week program to equip a select group of Beltsville Adventist Church members to develop the habit of focusing on gratitude instead of the negative. It was hypothesized that this would increase their experience of and expression of gratitude. The program highlighted the benefits of gratitude and practices that would increase gratitude with the group for twelve weeks. The participants filled out a pre and posttest and answered eight qualitative questions. The assessment data indicated that the study group did increase their overall level of gratitude and significantly increased their gratitude practice.

Hearing God through meditative Bible reading

Author
Kelly R Cupples
Abstract
It was hypothesized by the researcher that a program of habitual, meditative Bible reading would transformationally effectuate a stronger ability in GenXers and Millennials at Life Fellowship church to hear God's voice. Using a quantitative approach, data was accumulated after twelve weeks of instruction and application of the Bible reading method with the goal of hearing God. While results were modestly positive, the researcher concluded that though people indicated their desire to hear God, it is difficulty for many to establish and maintain the habit of meditative Bible reading for that purpose.

How will a biblically-based, humility-focused marriage enrichment counseling program applied to Christian marriages affect marital intimacy?

Author
Heath K Lisenby
Abstract
The thesis project was that a biblically-based, humility-focused marriage enrichment counseling program applied to Christian marriages will help improve marital intimacy. The researcher designed and implemented an 8-week, 15-hour counseling program to help Christian couples develop greater intimacy through learning how to put off pride and pursue biblically-based, Christ-centered humility before God, in their view of self, and in relationship with one another. Using both case study and phenomenological qualitative methods in addition to one quantitative measure, the results indicated that all five participant couples experienced improved marital intimacy related to completing the humility-focused marriage enrichment counseling program.

A description of students' development in conceptual interpretation of leadership theory and theology in the pastoral ministry course: Leadership theory and theology

Author
Jay A Held
Abstract
The thesis addressed the problem of students' cognitive integration of leadership theory and theology. This holistic case study included students in the fall 2014 Theory and Theology of Leadership class at Multnomah Bible College. It used a process that provided students with leadership theory, theology, practice, modeling, evaluation and feedback. A process of triangulation was engaged with five different sets of data. The research resulted in four implications for the instructor to better help develop students' capacity for cognitive integration of leadership theory and theology and two implications surfaced for future research.

Developing hope in men who love hope through role reversal in their marriage by using hope focused marriage counsel

Author
Samuel B Blair
Abstract
The project was designed to address role reversal within marriages and how hope can be used as a motivation to bring changes in the lives of men. It was the researcher's intention to use hope as the catalyst for change to help these men. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to implement a biblically based seminar on hope as a means of helping men deal with role reversal within their marriages. It can be concluded that the seminars, discussions, and materials provided were helpful in reaching the intended goals and objectives of the research.

Measuring the effect that a twelve-week sermon series which incorporates modeling has on the motivation levels of attenders of Cross Community Church regarding biblical attitudes toward community with other attenders of Cross Community Church

Author
Robert Bryan Fields
Abstract
The hypothesis of this project was that a twelve-week sermon series, which incorporates modeling through illustrations and stories, can motivate attenders of Cross Community Church to display biblical attitudes towards one another. The researcher preached a twelve-week sermon series as Cross Community Church in Poteau, Oklahoma. Each sermon focused on motivating the listeners to display biblical attitudes and behaviors toward one another. The testing utilized a qualitative survey that was developed by the author. The research indicated that the sermon series did increase the motivation level of attenders to practice biblical attitudes and behaviors with other attenders of Cross Community Church.

The effects of preaching a series of expository sermons on the mission of God from 1 Samuel 1-12 on the young adults' perception of their own identity and purpose in life in relation to God's larger story

Author
Hiap Siang Goh
Abstract
Eleven messages were preached employing Christopher Wright's missional hermeneutics grounded on the realities of who God is, God's story, and God's people. A pretest and posttest quantitative survey and well as a phenomenological study conducted at the end of the sermon series showed that the project had indeed influenced the young adults' preception of their identity and purpose.

Mindset, marital satisfaction, and volunteer commitment: a qualitative study with volunteer marriage leaders in northwest Arkansas

Author
Stewart D Grant
Abstract
This is an phenomenological project from a constructivist viewpoint to determine why five marriage education couples exceeded their volunteer commitment. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in order to understand the intrinsic and relational variables contributing to their service duration. Themes identified were (1) faith and belief as a framework, (2) personal and relational growth, and (3) growth mindset. A conceptual model of mindset appeared that served commitment and intent. This model is discussed, along with integration and other research models. Implications for volunteer coordinators and pastors of enrichment programs are suggested, along with ideas for future research.

Grateful remembrance of God's goodness amidst the stress of parenting young children

Author
Mark A Looyenga
Abstract
Among Christian parents with young children, staying attuned to God's goodness in daily life can be especially difficult. God's goodness can become blurred and muted by parenting difficulties and limitations. The problem studied was the effect a four-month group intervention with parents, focused upon the Triune God's goodness and gratitude rhythms, had on reducing parenting stress. Quantitative results of the four month group intervention were statistically significant and supported by the qualitative results. Those who practiced the gratitude rhythms expressed reduced parenting stress (12.6%) and pulse pressure (9.8%). They also showed growing awareness of God's goodness (11.7%) and gratitude (10.9%).
Subscribe to Denver Seminary