Denver Seminary

Mission Recovery: Finding Purpose and Health for the Church

Author
Ryan W Nilsen
Abstract
This study researched the effect of teaching about church health on the awareness, beliefs, and goals of congregational leaders. Teaching was conducted at a one-day workshop and focused on viewing church health through the lenses of God's mission, systems theory perspectives related to mission, and revitalization principles interpreted through God's mission for the church. Observations and interviews assessed how participants were impacted. Findings revealed changes in awareness, beliefs, and goals in participants, and that participants would benefit from further study and discussion in church health issues.

The Effect of a Spiritual Formation Program on Worry Reduction

Author
Scott A Hamilton
Abstract
The project was designed to help people reduce worry utilizing two spiritual formation practices: daily Bible reading and Praying the Ordinary. Teaching and training participants (twenty-five adult Christ-followers at Foundation Church, Sapulpa, Oklahoma) over a twelve-week period to pray and apply scriptures specifically addressing worry reduction and trusting in God throughout their day proved successful. Pre- and post program assessments showed significant positive change (3 of 5 sub-scales of the MCQ-30) with participants reducing worry and increasing trust in God.

Evangelism Practices among Members of the United States Air Force

Author
Erik Anthony Tisher
Abstract
This study addressed the challenge of practicing evangelism within the U.S. Air Force context. The researcher studied the scriptures and identified three traits of biblical evangelism found within both the Old and New Testaments. Using the Diffusion of Innovation Theory as theoretical grounding, the researcher then developed and taught a six-week evangelism seminar and mentored five Air Force members on evangelism. The researcher conducted phenomenological interviews with the seminar attendees and mentees. The interview data indicated that the project participants experienced both an increased perceived confidence and competence in their ability to practice evangelism in the Air Force context.

The effect on a select group of Cherry Hills Baptist Church members of a twelve-week class on turning points in post-Biblical Christian history

Author
Steve W Patzia
Abstract
The author conducted a qualitative project measuring what effect a twelve-week class on post-Biblical Christian history would have on selected participants from Cherry Hills Baptist Church. Using semi-structured pre- and post-class interviews, journals, and field notes, the researcher determined with the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of the Affective Domain that studying Christian history increased in participants a greater sense of community with the church, informed their way of thinking in the present context, and inspired them to live out their faith more confidently in the world.

Missional preaching: the role and work to mobilize a church to a place of missional engagement

Author
Charles B Kuthe
Abstract
Mission Preaching serves as a philosophy that governs an approach to church health. The basis for the research project was to both qualitatively and quantitatively discover if preaching has a measurable impact on a congregation's engagement in missions. The researcher conducted a presurvey and two postsurveys in conjunction with an eight week preaching series on "God's Heart for the World" to identify the impact of preaching on the church's existing involvement in missions. The conclusion showed a substantial increase in missional engagement after the sermon series was completed.

Conducting a growth mindset seminar for African American males who deal with self-hatred

Author
Arthur A Porter
Abstract
A three-day workshop was developed to teach a growth mindset to African-American males who deal with self-hatred. Follow-up discussion included Brainology, exercises using growth mindset theories, and effects of self-hatred. The Dweck mindset test and Sorensen self-esteem test were used. The results indicated a categorical reduction of self-hatred. The growth mindset provided a positive way of experiencing themselves. By viewing challenges and setbacks as opportunities one does not experience setbacks and challenges in a negative way. The results also indicated that self-hatred is increased by failure and is a negative way of experiencing oneself when one cannot fully engage and use one's abilities to the utmost in pursuit of something one values. The key to self-esteem is the willingness to accept challenges and setbacks and view them as opportunities.

The treatment of veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder war trauma to heal their memories and achieve forgiveness, in conjunction with couples therapy

Author
Charles W Grimsley
Abstract
This research addressed whether a cognitive behavioral group therapy intervention program focused on exposure therapy can meaningfully surface memories of trauma and lead to the healing of those memories. The project helped traumatized veterans who experienced posttraumatic stress disorder and moral injury for whom other forms of therapy had not worked. Methods used were cognitive behavioral therapy and prolonged exposure therapy, in the context of a 12-week couples therapy group. Results were resolution of traumatization and forgiveness. Findings are significant because it demonstrates that when moral injury is addressed, veterans heal, resolve anger issues, and learn to trust therapeutic contexts.

Expanding inclusion at an emerging church by adding the value of sacrificial inclusion

Author
Michael D Noel
Abstract
This project encouraged The Journey church members to adopt the value of sacrificial inclusion in order to bring more regular attenders into the intimate community of the church. The purpose of the project was to change attitudes, so church members would willingly include more people in the future. Two sermon series (self-differentiation; sacrificial inclusion) were preached over 12 weeks, with pretests and posttests measuring participants' attitudes toward this change. Responses to both were positive. The project introduced a new value which hopefully will enable additional steps by leadership to implement practical initiatives based on this value.

The effects of prioritizing the Great Commandment on increasing the prioritization of the Great Commission at the Nashville Boulevard SDA Church

Author
Steven L Haley
Abstract
The project thesis examines the impact of emphasizing the principles of the Great Commandment and the resultant effect on prioritization of the Great Commission, within a congregation experiencing membership decline in metro Nashville, TN. The author offers an analysis of church membership decline which is linked to congregational over-dependence on the proclamation model of evangelism, and the failure to engage in relationship-based growth strategies. The results of this study suggest that through emphasizing the practice and importance of God's love as defined in the Great Commandment, church members can express an increased desire to invest in reaching the community as commanded by Christ in the Great Commission.

With-God time management: learning time management as an aspect of the spiritual discipline of discernment on ministry leaders at West Rome Baptist Church

Author
Garland B Vance
Abstract
West Rome Baptist Church ministry leaders frequently identified themselves as "busy" or "exhausted" and expressed the desire to slow their pace of life in order to prevent burnout. The researcher conducted a phenomenological study to determine the effects of a twelve-week training on time management as a practice of discernment. With-God Time Management included training in discernment, time management best practices, as well as utilization of Sabbath and leisure. The researcher discovered seven effects including an increased awareness of God's presence and voice as well as unexpected increase in productivity.
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