Dallas Theological Seminary

An evaluation of the MarriageCore program in a Chinese church in the United States

Author
Limei W Weng
Abstract
The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the program and also to provide biblical foundation for couples. The literature review explored marital issues seen in diverse cultures, marital issues seen in Chinese-populated countries outside the United States (US), the current state and future of Christian marriages, and the biblical-theological-psychological basis of the study. Through implementation and translating MarriageCore to Chinese, the results showed that couples benefited from participating and improved their marital relationship and also grew mutually in spirit. Participants who joined alone also benefited from participating and showed improvement in their marital and spiritual states.

An evaluation of the expository preaching on the book of Haggai

Author
Kwang H Jung
Abstract
The purpose of this research project is to measure the modern audience's response to expository preaching on the Book of Haggai and the changes in their lives. The research method for this project was a program evaluation, which assessed the effectiveness of expository preaching from the Book of Haggai in hopes of stimulating the spiritual growth of young believers at Dong-do Presbyterian Church in Seoul in the areas of comprehension, convictions, and conduct. All quantitative data acquired through the surveys indicated that the participants experienced significant spiritual growth in each of these three areas.

The value of women's contributions to the ministry of parachurch organizations

Author
Elizabeth A Reedy
Abstract
Ministry leaders have not always valued the contributions of women, and this research project poses the question: why not? This qualitative research project evaluated selected factors that are associated with the contributions of women being valued by leaders of parachurch ministries, including how theological views of headship and cultural views of femininity are associated with the valuing of women's contributions. The qualitative research for this project was conducted through in-depth interviews in three parachurch ministry settings. This report discussed the relationship of the interview answers to these hypotheses, the unexpected themes that surfaced in the interviews, suggestions to parachurch ministries, and suggestions for further research.

An examination of the association between a mentoring relationship and effective transition of recently graduated female seminarians into church pastoral ministry

Author
Woon Hooi Tan
Abstract
This qualitative, phenomenological study sought to understand how mentoring would make seminary-to-church transition successful and thus facilitate female pastors to attain effective and satisfactory pastoral ministry. Purposeful, criterion sampling provided females pastors who had or did not have mentors during seminary-to-church transition and women who mentored female pastors during the mentees' transitional periods. Data collection involved face-to-face interviews. Findings indicated that women pastors encountered ministry adaptation, competency, and fulfillment problems during seminary-to-church transition. However, mentoring played the biggest role in helping entry-level female pastors transition effectively, producing six favorable transitional outcomes: ministry adjustment, competency, fulfillment, longevity, personal and spiritual growth, and a stronger relationship with God.

An evaluation of the relationship of participation in a short-term mission trip on church ministry involvement

Author
Linda S Aland-McMenamy
Abstract
The intention of the research for this dissertation is to evaluate the relationship between an individual's participation in a short-term mission trip and involvement in church ministry. The survey was administered to two groups in different cities in Tanzania, Africa, and to several groups from Northplace Church in Sachse, Texas. The examination is based on four different hypotheses administered through a descriptive survey of twenty-one questions. Hypothesis 1 investigates whether participation in a short-term mission trip increases activity in missions both locally and beyond. Hypothesis 2 considers whether participation in the short-term mission trip increases ministry involvement in the church through an increased awareness of other socio-economic groups and cultures. Hypothesis 3 determines whether participation in the short-term mission trip increases ministry involvement in the church through missions giving. Finally, Hypothesis 4 studies whether participation in a short-term mission trip increases ministry involvement in the church through an increased participation in spiritual formation.This research includes a literature review with respect to the purpose of missions with a focus on the short-term mission trip experience. It seeks to determine if statistically significant data can be obtained for any of the four hypotheses in the two countries where the surveys were given and presents explanations for such results.

Evaluation of an intergenerational discipling workshop developed for the women's ministry at Irving Bible Church

Author
Jeanne R Ballard
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of a workshop designed to motivate mature Christian women to take personal initiative to disciple younger women by addressing five areas inhibiting the older women. The researcher collected quantitative and qualitative data from the participants' responses to identical pretest and posttest self-assessment surveys. Statistical analysis of the survey responses combined with anecdotal information gathered from comments on the final survey provided evidence that the participants began thinking differently about making disciples, felt more confident, and began taking initiative to engage in intergenerational discipling relationships with younger women.

A survey of the preaching styles of selected pastors who preach to a predominately postmodern audience

Author
Timothy H Fisher
Abstract
This research project surveyed preachers 2009 Moody Bible Institute Pastor's conference in order to determine if there is a statistically significant relationship between preachers communicating to a postmodern audience verses preachers communicating to a non-postmodern audience with regard to capturing and holding attention, the style of communication used, and the use of the expository preaching style. The data collected from the preaching survey indicated a statistically significant relationship between preachers communicating to a postmodern audience verses preachers communicating to a non-postmodern audience, including a discernible shift with regard to expository preaching.

Understanding the relationship of the technologies of cell phones and social media with selected values in students

Author
James D Gribnitz
Abstract
Kids are growing up in a completely different world from their parents, and the technological boom is a major reason for this change. This research will seek to show how this technology relates to their values in three specific areas: authority, narcissism, community. The implications for parents are large, and the responsibility is great. Parents must first learn to model for students the values that they hold and want their kids to hold as well.

The development and evaluation of a discipleship curriculum for incarcerated women

Author
Evelyn C Tarbell
Abstract
This project sought to develop and evaluate a Christian discipleship curriculum for incarcerated women with a focus on their specific needs and circumstances. A prison sentence affords women time to reflect on their lives and accept the salvation that Jesus Christ offers. This curriculum emphasized issues of self-worth, abuse, forgiveness, the development of a biblically accurate view of God, guidance toward spiritual maturity and a plan for continued relationship with Christ after parole. Their return to communities as women who follow Christ can generate productive, law-abiding citizens who disciple their children and break familial cycles of criminal behavior.

Selected case studies of churches facilitating spiritual growth in online environments

Author
Robert Clayton Scroggins
Abstract
The thesis of this dissertation is that churches who create online environments that facilitate spiritual growth have three common practices as follows: practical Bible teaching that allows for a wide audience; a diversified web presence that allows multiple ways for users to connect; and a three-way relationship between the church, the user, and other users. This dissertation examines the following: an overview of spiritual growth for individuals and churches, online tools for personal growth, and online environments created by local churches for Internet users. The project then continues with an explanation of research procedure and an argument for the legitimacy of the case study method. He then reports the research formulated by the case studies. All three churches studied are rather large in size, each of them differs in culture and structure. However, there are commonalities in how their online environments facilitate spiritual growth, which supports the hypothesis. The dissertation concludes with a chapter presenting four principles for how churches can facilitate spiritual growth in online environments as well as potential ideas for related areas of study and research.
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