Bible--Use

Biblical authority and interpretation: a study for congregations

Author
Louise Miller Row
Abstract
This project proposes and prepares an eight-lesson adult study course presenting six different approaches to issues of biblical authority and interpretation through the work of six theologians--Pope Gregory I, Martin Luther, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Benjamin B Warfield, Karl Barth, and Paul Tillich. The first lesson defines terms and uses a questionnaire to determine the understanding of biblical authority and interpretation held by each participant. Subsequent lessons investigate various approaches to these issues, including a sermon by each theologian. The final lesson compares the approaches and considers how they might respond to a contemporary social issue.

Developing a biblical approach to dealing with emotions and equipping selected leaders in the application of this approach

Author
Ross J Shepherd
Abstract
This project develops biblical materials to educate church leaders to think biblically about emotions and to teach others about the relation between biblical principles and human emotions. The project employs a cognitive approach to change how people feel by changing how they think, leading participants to improved knowledge, attitude, understanding, and skill in handling anger, depression, anxiety, fear, guilt, and forgiveness.

Training christians to reach secular people through the use of Biblical stories

Author
David J O'Leary
Abstract
This project proposes that church members can be trained to use biblical stories in dialogue with non-Christians to improve their understanding of crucial Christian concepts: initiative, revelation, alienation, incarnation, substitution, regeneration, reconciliation, community, empowerment, and consummation. The project rains 31 participants to use 10 biblical stories in dialogue with non-Christian discussion partners. These participants grow in comfort with evangelism, improve attitudes of non-Christians toward Christianity, and promote significant changes in cognitive understanding of the ten concepts.

Significance of the Old Testament feasts to contemporary church worship

Author
Craig P Scott
Abstract
This project examines the annual cycle of feasts in Leviticus 23 (Passover, Unleavened Bread, Firstfruits, Weeks, Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) as a framework for a yearly church calendar. Beginning with a general survey of the origin, history, and theological implications of each feast, the project develops contemporary worship models for the church. Each model separately highlights a feast in an innovative way so that it may then be implemented and evaluated. Materials developed include a biblical Passover Haggadah, a Sunday School curriculum for ages 3 through sixth grade, and an annual homiletic schedule.

The development and implementation of a discipleship paradigm based on the epistles

Author
Mitchell Wayne Dillon
Abstract
This project evolved from the question, "What should be taught, or 'passed on,' in a discipleship training program?" The New Testament Epistles offer a unique model of discipleship for the church as well as content for discipleship training. A study of the evolution of discipleship from the Gospels to the context of the church supports this hypothesis. The project develops a paradigm from the Epistles, which it then implements and evaluates for its effectiveness. The Pre-test/Post-test design demonstrated that the program is effective.

Developing a teaching guide for Presbyterian newcomers

Author
Michael A Roberts
Abstract
This project develops a teaching guide to initiate newcomers into the Christian faith and the Presbyterian tradition more effectively. The project begins with an exposition of Lesslie Newbigin's thought and then develops a teaching guide for Presbyterian newcomers. Newbigin provides analysis and resources that are helpful in reaching newcomers who are strongly influenced by a secular worldview. Newbigin's thought on the Enlightenment, religious pluralism, and the Bible is explored. Two chapters in the teaching guide are then presented, one on pluralism and one on the Bible. The project concludes with an annotated table of contents for the complete guidebook.

The development of guidelines for lay ministry in a Missouri Synod Lutheran congregation

Author
Milan A Nesko
Abstract
Lay ministry to promote the gospel of Jesus Christ is a combined effort with the pastor. This study formed guidelines for such ministry. A research of the biblical background of lay ministry centered on the terms elder, deacon, and bishop plus the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Also included was teaching on the nascent church, contemporary churches, and priesthood of believers. The guidelines showed a multiplicity of ministries by laity and pastor are a strategy devised by the Holy Spirit.

A manual for leaders of overseas short-term volunteer work camps of the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
H Russell Blanchard
Abstract
This thesis involved a study of stewardship, an historical examination of events that led to the STVIM (Short-term Volunteers in Mission) movement, and an examination of STVIM materials to produce a uniform manual for assisting STVIM teachings. The biblical concept, based on the word, "oikonomia," traces God's plan of stewardship from creation to living-out Jesus' teachings. Historical and informational STVIM material was combined with the personal experience of the author in leading STVIM teams. The material was evaluated by 55 persons related to STVIM. This thesis resulted in the production of a STVIM leader's manual for the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the UMC.

Loneliness in the life of the divorced single

Author
Gary A Whitbeck
Abstract
The purpose of the project was to discover ways to use the Bible effectively in counseling with divorced singles. While working with divorced people the author discovered one theme that is common to nearly all divorce situations, the theme of loneliness. To address the theme of loneliness he modeled his procedure after William B Ogleby Jr's book Biblical themes for pastoral care. Oglesby underscores the importance of using the biblical story to intersect life themes. Similarly the author used the biblical images of Hosea, the Israelites wandering in the wilderness, and Jesus alone in the garden and on the cross, to illustrate the feeling of loneliness in the life of the divorced single.

The use of the bible in one-on-one caring ministry by trained lay volunteer stephen ministers in the congregation

Author
Russell E Money
Abstract
Research and experience with Bible use in pastoral care led to a proposal that lay volunteers learn to use the parables of Jesus in caring ministry to aid helpees in telling their story as a means to order in their lives. Volunteers trained in parable use with helpees and in verbatim-writing evaluated that use. Infrequent opportunity for Bible use with helpees by volunteer ministers did not provide the experience or justify the training needed to maintain proficiency. Much was learned about New Testament interpretation and use of the Bible in pastoral care was confirmed and improved.
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