Bible--Use

Voices from Lamentations in the intersubjective matrix of the pastoral psychotherapeutic process: a case study

Author
Susan MacDonald Roddey
Abstract
The purpose of this case study is to explore the development of a fluid methodology for the use of biblical narrative within the intersubjective context of the pastoral psychotherapeutic relationship. Qualitative research methods are used to analyze transcripts of seven sessions of therapy, in between which both the therapist and client mutually engage in reading Lamentations. The results suggest that for this particular client the methodology used within the therapy facilitated an integrative reorientation in her relationship with God, herself, and others, and the development of a transformed language of faith that was real and true to her experience.

Storytelling: the gospel in a Muslim context

Author
James Gregory Couch
Abstract
Throughout the study, storytelling and guided discussion in a one-on-one encounter with an Afghan seeker has been employed. This thesis follows the history of the study's inception and development in preparation for translation into the native tongues of Afghanistan and likeminded Muslim populations.

Application in biblical preaching

Author
Brian Jones
Abstract
This work is a study focused on the problems of applying the Bible to modern life in the context of biblical preaching. This thesis begins with a statement of the problem in chapter 1, followed by an argument that application is a theological necessity in chapter 2. Chapter 3 reviews some relevant literature in the field of hermeneutics, specializing in the realm of application. Chapter 4 outlines the approach advocated in this thesis. Chapter 5 reports on the author's teaching experience at Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary in the fall of 2002.

Developing a biblical approach to dealing with emotions and equipping selected leaders in the application of this approach

Author
Ross J Shepherd
Abstract
This project develops biblical materials to educate church leaders to think biblically about emotions and to teach others about the relation between biblical principles and human emotions. The project employs a cognitive approach to change how people feel by changing how they think, leading participants to improved knowledge, attitude, understanding, and skill in handling anger, depression, anxiety, fear, guilt, and forgiveness.

Training christians to reach secular people through the use of Biblical stories

Author
David J O'Leary
Abstract
This project proposes that church members can be trained to use biblical stories in dialogue with non-Christians to improve their understanding of crucial Christian concepts: initiative, revelation, alienation, incarnation, substitution, regeneration, reconciliation, community, empowerment, and consummation. The project rains 31 participants to use 10 biblical stories in dialogue with non-Christian discussion partners. These participants grow in comfort with evangelism, improve attitudes of non-Christians toward Christianity, and promote significant changes in cognitive understanding of the ten concepts.

Significance of the Old Testament feasts to contemporary church worship

Author
Craig P Scott
Abstract
This project examines the annual cycle of feasts in Leviticus 23 (Passover, Unleavened Bread, Firstfruits, Weeks, Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) as a framework for a yearly church calendar. Beginning with a general survey of the origin, history, and theological implications of each feast, the project develops contemporary worship models for the church. Each model separately highlights a feast in an innovative way so that it may then be implemented and evaluated. Materials developed include a biblical Passover Haggadah, a Sunday School curriculum for ages 3 through sixth grade, and an annual homiletic schedule.

The development and implementation of a discipleship paradigm based on the epistles

Author
Mitchell Wayne Dillon
Abstract
This project evolved from the question, "What should be taught, or 'passed on,' in a discipleship training program?" The New Testament Epistles offer a unique model of discipleship for the church as well as content for discipleship training. A study of the evolution of discipleship from the Gospels to the context of the church supports this hypothesis. The project develops a paradigm from the Epistles, which it then implements and evaluates for its effectiveness. The Pre-test/Post-test design demonstrated that the program is effective.

Developing a teaching guide for Presbyterian newcomers

Author
Michael A Roberts
Abstract
This project develops a teaching guide to initiate newcomers into the Christian faith and the Presbyterian tradition more effectively. The project begins with an exposition of Lesslie Newbigin's thought and then develops a teaching guide for Presbyterian newcomers. Newbigin provides analysis and resources that are helpful in reaching newcomers who are strongly influenced by a secular worldview. Newbigin's thought on the Enlightenment, religious pluralism, and the Bible is explored. Two chapters in the teaching guide are then presented, one on pluralism and one on the Bible. The project concludes with an annotated table of contents for the complete guidebook.

The development of guidelines for lay ministry in a Missouri Synod Lutheran congregation

Author
Milan A Nesko
Abstract
Lay ministry to promote the gospel of Jesus Christ is a combined effort with the pastor. This study formed guidelines for such ministry. A research of the biblical background of lay ministry centered on the terms elder, deacon, and bishop plus the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Also included was teaching on the nascent church, contemporary churches, and priesthood of believers. The guidelines showed a multiplicity of ministries by laity and pastor are a strategy devised by the Holy Spirit.
Subscribe to Bible--Use