Bible--Study--Methodology

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Determining the benefits of discipleship training using the Bible as primary discussion material in various sized groups of 3-4, 10-14, and 20+

Author
Daniel G Kachikis
Abstract
Using a one-year Bible as the sole discipleship material and discussion as the primary method of guidance, the author surveyed three research study groups of different sizes. The findings indicate that using the one-year Bible helped the participants grow in their love for Christ and love for the Word. This study also saw participants grow in their confidence to make disciples and grow in their willingness to make disciple-making their lifestyle in following Christ. Regarding the optimal group size, the author found that groups of five to eight seemed to naturally become the best platform for discipleship.

An inductive Bible study training program for Christian adults at the EF Church of Clear Lake, Iowa utilizing Leadership Resources International TNT Dig-and-Discover hermeneutical principles

Author
Daniel W Jordan
Abstract
The Dig-and-Discover manual developed by Leadership Resources International was used to train eight lay adult members of the Evangelical Free Church of Clear Lake, Iowa in an inductive, grammatical hermeneutic for Bible study. Worksheets with assigned passages and questions were distributed and returned for pre-training assignments, in-training homework, and concluding with a post-training project. The pre- and post-training worksheets were compared to determine the trainee's understanding and application of the principles. The training manual gave sound basis for Bible study, and proved useful for literate adults to learn and practice the principles.

A design for continuing education in biblical holiness preaching

Author
Duane C Brush
Abstract
The problem facing preachers in the Church of the Nazarene of how to clearly and convincingly proclaim the biblical call to holy living is explored, A survey was conducted to examine the challenges faced in preaching and teaching biblical holiness. Major problem areas identified include the language used to describe biblical holiness and how to apply the subject to contemporary audiences. To address these problems a model continuing education course was designed and presented. Both pre- and postcourse evaluations of participants were conducted. Recommendations include a program of training and continuing education for Nazarene preachers in methods of biblical exegesis and application related to the effective proclamation of biblical holiness.

Developing a course to teach congregants to interpret Scripture

Author
Gene A Cassady
Abstract
This project was birthed out of the need to provide lay persons with a solid foundation for interpreting Scripture. Many approach the Bible as a collection of verses with little to no connection and thereby formulate misunderstandings of God's work and world. This project surveys the history of interpretation to gain perspective and learn from the past. Then, it examines scholarly resources and those intended for lay persons to discover the topics which need to be addressed. A number of basic principles of Bible study are discussed in order to form a foundational course to help lay people learn to interpret Scripture.

Utilizing inductive Bible study for the spiritual growth of selected youth members at Bakersfield Korean Baptist Church, California

Author
Hyunhee Chang
Abstract
Most Christians have a desire for spiritual growth. Personal Bible study is indispensible in their spiritual growth. However, they do not study the Bible due to their inexperience with how to study the Bible, their lack of motivation or their laziness. The purpose of the project is to utilize inductive Bible study for spiritual growth of the selected youth at Bakersfield Korean Baptist Church in Bakersfield, CA. The writer designs to complete numerous hours of study as well as reflections and implement a twelve-week training that meets in weekly sessions. This project was a success not only in enhancing the participants' abilities to study the Bible by inductive method, but also fostering trust and love in God's Word.

A manual to help house church leaders in China understand and teach the biblical doctrine

Author
Yan Xiong
Abstract
This thesis presents a rationale for training Chinese house church leaders. The author believes that a true and concise biblical manual will train the Chinese house church leaders, who in turn can help house church Christians to understand the Bible in a way that will eliminate heresies, strengthen faith, and lead them to the kingdom of God. The author researched widely in terms of books, articles, and trustworthy websites. He used a narrative approach as this best suits the subject matter. His conclusion is: a good manual to help Chinese house church leaders is absolutely necessary at this time.

Communicating authorial intent through biblical narrative to children

Author
Larry Thomas Harvey
Abstract
The thesis project will attempt to demonstrate the relationship between biblical hermeneutics and homiletics in a way that effectively teaches children about the morals of biblical stories. Based on the presupposition that the goal of hermeneutics is to discover the intended meaning of the biblical author within his original historical/grammatical/cultural milieu and further that the goal of homiletics os to convey the biblical author's intended meaning to a contemporary audience via a simple single idea (moral), the biblical moral will be both relevant and timeless and can effectively be communicated to children through biblical narrative.

"Do as I have done for you": a Bible study for servant leadership as lay leadership training program in Ames KUMC

Author
Chan Gok Kim
Abstract
The objective of this study is the development of a lay leader training program. The Robert K. Greenleaf Center's emphasis, "Servant leader's ten characteristics," was made in to the Bible study teaching material, "Do as I have done for you." The teaching material was aimed at the participants who wanted to attend the Ames Korean United Methodist Church small group leadership class. "A Bible study for servant leadership as lay leadership training program" was successfully executed. In order to measure the effect on the lay leader training program, the first program of participants completed an assessment of the program. In order to measure the awareness of changes as a servant leader, the second program of participants completed another assessment. By the results program, lay leader training appeared to have much significance.
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