Bible--Psychology

Towards a Reformed Evangelical Program of Spiritual Formation at Ryle Seminary, Ottawa

Author
Shaun Minett Turner D.Min.
Abstract
In this research portfolio the author seeks to articulate a form of reformed-evangelical spiritual formation and apply it to ministry formation training in both military and civilian ministry training contexts. The author sees spiritual formation as stripping off the old self and putting on the new self by looking to Jesus. Research is presented which shows that this formation often leads to greater resilience in ministry and life, as well as an increased awareness of, and dependence on, God’s sovereign grace, leading to a deeper sense of discerning God’s voice every day. The author used three parts: a personal spiritual autobiography, a model of spiritual formation in the reformed-evangelical tradition, and a field research project using appreciative inquiry to develop an integrated spiritual formation program at a reformed-evangelical seminary in Ottawa, Canada. The author was successful in using an appreciative approach to engage the students of the Seminary to design a program that was accepted by an expert panel of school administration, denominational leadership, and student leadership. This research portfolio provides both a practical model of spiritual formation in the reformed-evangelical tradition and a means of tailoring this model, through appreciative inquiry, to specific contexts.

Relationship issues: a curricular response

Author
Vivian Yvonne Bryant
Abstract
Male/female relationships are always a topic for discussion in any group. This study concerns itself with relationships and how intimacy, conflict, and communication affect codependent relationships. The study examines the Bible, analytical psychology, and traces relationships from biblical times to the present. The project presents a psycho-educational view, which combines and integrates psychology and religion. Combining the cognitive, affective, and spiritual, this project presents a curriculum that specifically speaks to individuals with poor skills in maintaining relationships due to codependent behavior patterns. The approach used is outlined and presented in a ten week intensive course. Utilizing the tenets of family therapy, education, and the Bible, the course assists participants in addressing and working through prior experiences that hinder the forming and maintaining of healthy relationships. It uses the support group format and structure while incorporating literature, Bible study, and movies to speak to, empower, and enable program participants to take responsibility for their lives.

Developing a biblical approach to dealing with emotions and equipping selected leaders in the application of this approach

Author
Ross J Shepherd
Abstract
This project develops biblical materials to educate church leaders to think biblically about emotions and to teach others about the relation between biblical principles and human emotions. The project employs a cognitive approach to change how people feel by changing how they think, leading participants to improved knowledge, attitude, understanding, and skill in handling anger, depression, anxiety, fear, guilt, and forgiveness.

Mourning, memory/meaning, and moving on: a loss and grief seminar for high school youth

Author
Leonard L King
Abstract
This project seeks to help grieving teenagers to discover a holistic approach to life through two seminars, one conducted in a local high school and the other in a local church. Through biblical perspectives on blessing, honor, shame, and loss, particularly in the experience of King Saul, the project guides participants to identify and confront the influence of shame and dishonor during and after a loss. Signs of shame and dishonor manifested during the study are disguised by feelings of worthlessness, failure, embarrassment, and inferiority. Teenagers need to feel loved and accepted during a loss and to be welcomed into the faith community.

Integrating Erik Erikson's psychosocial development theory with biblical story and vision: an alternative model for Bible study

Author
Harold J Mortimer
Abstract
This project proposes an alternative method of Bible study integrating psychology and theology. Using the structure and language of Erik H Erikson's psychosocial development model, the object relations insights of John McDargh, and the structural self-development theory of Robert Kegan, a group of six adults engages in an eight-week Bible study to explore ways in which selected biblical narratives interact with the dynamics of developmental psychology. Participants find that the Bible is a source of profound psychological insight and that faith development and self-development are inextricably linked.

Enlisting and training a support group of spiritual peers in the biblical methods and principles of conflict resolution

Author
Thomas Shawn Brewer
Abstract
This project proposes to equip lay church leaders to apply biblical concepts of conflict resolution to situations in families, churches, and circles of interaction. Through a series of topical sermons, a study group, and a one-day training seminar, the project exposes lay leaders to family systems theory and biblical principles in order to prepare them to work with pastors in conflict management ministry.

Compassionate evangelism

Author
George C Cushman
Abstract
This project is a theological reflection on Jesus' statement, "Be compassionate as your Father is compassionate" (Lk 6:36 NEB). It begins by looking at a contemporary understanding of compassion, and then moves to a biblical reflection on the word in both the First and Second Testaments. Numerous anecdotes and stories reflecting 15 years of ministry help bridge the biblical witness with contemporary life in the church. Study questions at the end of each chapter aid personal reflection and group discussion. The project concludes that compassion is much more than an emotion; it is a full process to be followed in the practice of ministry.

The healing journey: the use of biblical narrative in the grief process

Author
Jeannette G Rodenbough
Abstract
There is need for a grief workshop based on faith traditions, the Reformed faith in particular, that uses biblical narrative as guide to healing. This dissertation examines the psycho-social aspects of grief and healing, the value of telling one's story in that process, and a study of Job and Psalms 112, 88, and 30 as theological commentary to the journey of grief and healing. The result is a grief workshop design, with comments by three evaluators. The concluding section of the dissertation reconsiders the workshop as evaluated, and its implications for ministry.
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