Bible--Liturgical use

PREACHING CHRIST FROM VIETNAMESE PROVERBS AND FOLK POETRY

Author
Dieu Tran D.Min.
Abstract
Peter Dieu Tran, M.A., D.Min. Aquinas Institute of Theology, Saint Louis, Missouri, 2021.

This doctor of ministry thesis is an attempt to contribute to the preaching mission in Vietnam. Dealing with the problem that many Vietnamese preachers face (Chapter I), this project proposes that preachers use proverbs and folk poetry in their preaching. Before trying to put this preaching method into practice, this thesis looks at the theological framework (Chapter II), the homiletical foundation (Chapter III), and a brief study of Vietnamese proverbs and folk poetry (Chapter IV). Chapter V details the ministerial intervention of this project and the interpretation of its outcomes. Chapter VI reviews the overall project and the next steps for my research.

PREPARING THE SOIL FOR PREACHING CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING THROUGH EMPATHETIC NARRATIVE

Author
William Hisker D.Min.
Abstract
The research study explores the theological and social-psychological forces that discourage the preaching of the prophetic message of the Gospel. The study was conducted with seventy-four volunteers and six permanent deacons in the Diocese of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. The study used a combination of quantitative and qualitative surveys and interviews. The hypothesis explored was whether or not the use of narrative techniques, specifically Narrative 4 story exchange would be useful as a technique for preparing congregations to be open to the challenges presented by Catholic social teaching. Additionally, the research sought to determine whether or not the six deacons who participated in the study would find narrative a useful technique in their preaching and evangelization efforts.

Participants completed an empathy profile before viewing one of seven different videos produced by the United States Conference of Bishops on the Life and Dignity of the Human Person; the Call to Family, Community, and Participation; the Option for the Poor and Vulnerable; Rights and Responsibilities; Solidarity; Care for God’s Creation; and the Dignity of Work. Participants were asked to rate the videos and indicate how often they heard preaching of the subject matter of the videos. Participants were also given the opportunity to participate in a Narrative 4 story exchange. Participants were then asked to complete the Interpersonal Reactivity Index a second time to see if there was a statistically significant change in their empathy profile. In addition, participants were asked to evaluate their experience with the story exchange. While there was no significant statistical change, as measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, the interviewees demonstrated a high level of approval for the story exchange as a vehicle for improving the empathetic response of a congregation and as a useful technique for use in the preaching of Catholic social teaching.

Liturgical Drama in the Church: an Application of Daily Scriptural Living

Author
Alma Lee Langley-Ward D.Min.
Abstract
The main purpose of this research was to study the validity of using liturgical drama as a vital tool of expression to help make Scripture come alive for the application and transformation of lives, first of the researcher’s local congregation and eventually of other churches. The researcher wrote and directed a play based on Luke 1:26-35 using members of the Greater Friendship Missionary Baptist Church as actors and crew. The entire church was a participant of this research as the play was done during a Sunday morning worship service as part of the liturgy. The mixed-method approach presented the most viable pathway for this study and the researcher surveyed a cross-section of the congregation both as actors and audience members. The essential elements considered in using this method involved selecting the Scripture passage; observing the participants during rehearsals to determine their level of understanding of their roles and the motivation for their actions; and administering a survey to measure and analyze the effectiveness of the play in increasing biblical knowledge and inspiring transformation that would produce daily scriptural application. For a more objective case study, the researcher chose those members who presented with a limited understanding of Scripture and were interested in learning through their participation in the play. Rehearsals ran once a week for six weeks with additional rehearsals during the final week. The focus of the observation was on the conduct of the cast from week to week. The researcher assessed each cast member for transformation and changes in behavioral patterns. The findings suggest that using liturgical drama as a model for teaching the Word of God can be an effective teaching tool. The researcher claims that there is still hope of liturgical drama being a key part of the liturgy and worship

Learning to Pray Without Ceasing: Instilling the Importance of Prayer and its Connection to Social Justice in Youth

Author
Wesley Brian Jamison D.Min.
Abstract
Progressive churches continue to struggle with retaining youth, who often seen little merit in the church's traditions and rituals. These spiritual practices are essential to nurturing the strength and vision necessary to create a more just, equitable, and sustainable world. This project offers a model for integrating these practices into the regular activities of youth ministry as a way of reconnecting them to the struggle for justice. It was tested by adding the observance of the daily offices of prayer to a youth mission trip and examining the views of participants concerning prayer and its connection to justice before, during, and after the trip. Noticeable changes were measured during and after the trip, indicating that youth came to see spiritual practices are more important to the work of justice. These findings suggest that the church would do well to look to its own history of monasticism as a model for youth ministry in the post-Christian era.

The Word in our mouths Scripture memory and recitation as proclamation in congregational worship and practice

Author
Stacey Simpson Duke
Abstract
This project considers a re-imagined communal engagement with the oral/aural dimension of Scripture. The thesis of this project is that Scripture memory and recitation within public worship can provide pastors of mainline congregations a way to facilitate fresh encounters with Scripture as a living Word. Using ethnographic listening practices, the study investigates the effect of Scripture recitation as a form of proclamation in one mainline Protestant congregation over the course of two years. The project concludes that this simple, ancient practice offers dynamic possibilities for congregations to engage with Scripture in a personal and powerful way.

Examining and enhancing public oral reading of Scripture among independent Baptist ministries

Author
William R Smith
Abstract
This thesis and accompanying handbook is written to enhance and improve public Scripture reading skills of pastors and oral readers. The author produced a handbook for public Scripture reading that assists pastors, Bible colllege students, and ministry professionals, which is a result of research and assessment of oral Scripture reading skills. The desired outcome is that the Scriptures will be read expressively, accurately, and powerfully. The researcher's aspiration is that good public Scripture reading will be implemented in churches and Bible colleges and elevated in ministries as a result of this thesis and accompanying handbook.

The word made flesh: experiencing the presence of Christ in the liturgy of the word

Author
Dina McMullin Ferduson
Abstract
This project examines the impact on members of three Episcopal congregations in the diocese of Los Angeles regarding their worship experience and their behavior outside of worship when the gospel is told as a story rather than read from the gospel book. Most respondents want the gospel told at least once a month; many say it makes their worship experience deeper and presents an opportunity for evangelism. Results show telling the gospel is a legitimate alternative method of gospel proclamation that enables many members of liturgical congregations to hear and engage the Word of God more deeply.

Getting on the same page: transitioning from the King James Version: a case study of a Baptist congregation

Author
Donald W Burke
Abstract
Four centuries have antiquated the once modern language of the King James Version of the Bible, causing it to increasingly obscure God's message to the contemporary English-speaking world. Using a Bible written in a commoner-friendly language is essential for the effective work of contemporary ministry. However, those churches that are willing to make the change from the KJV to a contemporary version are faced with a lack of guidelines and principles to help them navigate the transition. In an effort to fill this void, this study examined the change process of a Baptist congregation which transitioned from the King James Version to a modern-language Bible as its primary worship text. The findings confirmed that transitioning from the antiquated wording of the KJV to a contemporary-language version was beneficial to the members and the ministries of the congregation. However the study also concluded that the process and benefits of transition were best set within a framework of deeper missional purpose.

Lutheran worship: the relationship of the worship of God's people in the past and present

Author
Michael W Wollman
Abstract
The author intended to show how worship throughout the ages, as described in the scriptures, has been closely linked to liturgical form by divine intention. The Bible, both Old and New Testaments, was carefully researched to discover if there were certain criteria common to all eras of worship that should be expected to be seen in contemporary settings. The author concluded that there are several critical parts to the worship of God's people linked consistently through a liturgical practice prescribed by God. These ought to be seen in modern worship in order to maintain a historical unity with worship of God's people throughout the ages.

Everbody's got a little light under the sun: redeeming, restoring and reconciling the biblical story through drama for the African-American community

Author
Heath L Cheek
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to show how drama can encourage the congregation of the Varick Memorial A. M. E. Zion Church to connect their story as African-Americans to the biblical story. The methods of research for this dissertation were: the author portraying biblical characters during Sunday morning worship services, the author's engaging in dramatic projects with congregation members, locating and incorporating theological and historical source material, and adapting theatrical concepts learned in undergraduate studies. It was concluded that drama can be effectively utilized to encourage African-Americans and other ethnic groups to connect their stories to the biblical stories.
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