Bible--Peter I

TRAINING CHURCH MEMBERS FOR PERSONAL EVANGELISM IN A SECULAR POST-CHRISTIAN CONTEXT

Author
Gavin Perkins D.Min.
Abstract
The author’s chief goal in this project was to produce and pilot a useful and effective resource in training believers in personal evangelism. Although he conducted the field work during COVID-19 lockdowns and disruption that goal was substantially achieved.

Biblical study, theological reflection, and sociological insights formed the foundation for the author’s development of the training course. That research shaped a congregational survey regarding attitudes to personal evangelism, which in turn fed into an expert sample of ministry leaders and evangelistic trainers. In the light of these inputs the author wrote and piloted a four-week evangelistic training course. Course participant responses enabled the author to make a preliminary assessment regarding the effectiveness of the training course.

The author then suggested a trajectory along which he could develop the course, and supplement it with additional support and resources. He also mapped out a ministry plan for the construction of an evangelistic ecosystem within a local church, incorporating an adapted version of the piloted course alongside additional groups and further input.

The needs identified in this project regarding evangelistic training were greater than could be met in a short four-week course, but the author identified sufficient reasons for confidence that, alongside further ministry inputs, such a course could play a vital part in shifting a church’s culture in a more evangelistic direction.

TOWARDS A STRATEGY OF GOSPEL GROWTH FOR CHURCHES FACING THE CHALLENGES OF MINISTRY & MISSION IN COASTAL CONTEXTS IN SYDNEY

Author
Richard Wenden D.Min.
Abstract
Churches in the 21st century find themselves in a post-Christian context, and the ongoing challenge for ministry teams and their congregations is how to adapt to this changing landscape with the accompanying cultural shifts. Churches in suburban coastal contexts face a myriad of challenges, especially the lifestyle that comes with living in what are deemed to be ‘destination’ suburbs. This Project is an attempt to consider these challenges afresh against the biblical and theological backdrop of the church’s mission, in line with God’s mission in Scripture. It explores these challenges through the lens of the Bible, 1 Peter in particular, where Christians are very much ‘in exile’.

The Project shows how an understanding of cultural movements and demographics, the importance of contextualization as a way of engaging people with the gospel, and how a shift in the church’s thinking towards adopting a ‘Third Place’ posture enables us to show people what real gospel-oriented community looks like. Ultimately it seeks to offer some ways forward along the lines of embracing an urban spirituality, helping people to see how the gospel can ‘reorder their disordered loves’ as they are pointed towards Jesus, and how more intentional training in discipleship and evangelism might equip congregations to be a faithful presence in their spheres of influence.

This Project focused upon congregations along Sydney’s coastal fringe. Through interviews with ministers of Anglican churches at the ‘coalface’ and by utilizing qualitative data, the goal is to assist churches that have historically struggled in coastal contexts to formulate strategies enabling them to be missionally effective, through a renewed approach to ministry planning. It is hoped this planning may bring significant, gospel-based, long-term impact on individual church members and the churches, to bring blessing to their suburbs, gospel growth to churches, and glory to God.

A church-wide emphasis, with preaching and teaching, provided the platform for instilling in members of Polkville Baptist Church a better understanding of the individual's role in the community of faith, the goal being that a greater percentage of...

Author
Richard Lee Hamrick
Abstract
A church-wide emphasis, with preaching and teaching, provided the platform for instilling in members of Polkville Baptist Church a better understanding of the individual's role in the community of faith, the goal being that a greater percentage of members take an active role in the church. The twelve-member research group was tracked individually, and the control group was tracked as a unit. Following the emphasis, care was taken to discover if there were more members involved in the life of the church than before the emphasis. There was a clear growth in understanding and in the number of active members.

Understanding expatriates: some implications for ministry to isolated expatriates in Japan

Author
Mary Kay Sapp
Abstract
Pastors of international churches need an understanding of the sociological and psychological effects of living as a foreigner in an isolated situation in order to minister to expatriates effectively. Social legitimation of identity, culture shock, loneliness, and Maslow's hierarchy of need are examined. Images of the church and the message of I Peter are analyzed to draw implications for ministry within the Japanese situation. The resultant suggestions for ministry are evaluated by pastors. The insights into the expatriate experience and the suggestions to meet the ministry needs that result are applicable also to those in other cultural situations.

Research into expository preaching: using 1 Peter as a model for preparation of expository sermons based on the structural analysis of the biblical text

Author
Chih-Zin Hsiao
Abstract
This research project suggests that preaching is an honorable obligation of preachers; it is also a means to revive churches and to help believers grow. Preachers who have not experienced the full power of preaching lack practice in expository preaching. Expository preaching involves understanding the contents of both exegesis and preaching, which means interpreting the Bible and applying the teachings in the congregation. In order to gain wisdom from the Bible, one needs to fully comprehend the meanings of the Word. using the type of analysis that rearranges syntactical Greek and examines the Chinese and English language structures helps achieve this goal. This type of analysis yields syntactical display, which shows not only the threads of thought in the Scriptures, but also the outline of expository preaching. The writer has analyzed 1 Peter, using syntactical display in Greek, English NASB, and Chinese Union bibles, as well as developed the outlines for expository preaching for Chapter 5.
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