Bible--Old Testament--Study--Methodology

IDENTIFYING COMMON CHALLENGES FACING LEADERS IN THE SECOND GENERATION OF LARGE CHURCHES TO FORTIFY HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH DOWNTOWN (MINNEAPOLIS)

Author
Cor M Chmieleski D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to identify common challenges facing leaders in the
second generation of large churches. This was the reality of Hope Community Church
Downtown (HCC DT) in Minneapolis, MN at the time of this paper’s formation. Specific areas
of challenge which have been explored include growth from small to large and transitions in
leadership between generation and senior leaders. The fortification of the church depends on
building an accurate list of common challenges that can be later addressed by church staff and
leadership.

The process utilized to accomplish that purpose included robust biblical and literature
research followed by interviews with seven pastors serving in churches similar to HCC DT. The
initial research led to a preliminary list of challenges which were then utilized in interviews to
determine their relative validity within the lived experiences of pastors. Analysis of the research
and field work revealed five significant findings churches must address for the sake of long-term
endurance: (1) Answer the question, “Who are we today?”, (2) Address unavoidable realities, (3)
Foster the following, (4) Protect against these, and (5) Achieve success in pastoral succession.
Each of these is explained and illustrated with real-life examples from within local churches.

Upon completion of this project, a list of common challenges was presented to the elders
and staff of HCC DT. It was then their responsibility to read, discuss, pray, and respond to the
challenges addressed herein.

"Hearing Habakkuk: Lessons on Accurately Applying the Text From the Turkana, Kenya Context"

Author
Graham Robert Blaikie D.Min.
Abstract
One of Jesus’ favorite sayings, “He who has ears, let him hear,” highlights the divine expectation that the message heard must be heeded—it has to be applied.

“Application” refers to the requirements of the biblical text, and our obedient response to those requirements. Accurate application, therefore, involves “hearing”/heeding what the text requires of us today—but only after we have heard what it required of the original recipients.

This project seeks to explore what constitutes accurate application from within the context of the book of Habakkuk, which a group of Turkana pastors were focusing on in their Bible Pathways training program held at Share International’s SEND Center in Lodwar, Kenya, in July 2017. Habakkuk was the eighth of nine Pathways preaching modules taught to the Turkana pastors over a three-year period by a team of six U.S.-based pastors, including the project writer.

While excellent in many ways, the Pathways curriculum is weak in application. And so, the book of Habakkuk and Turkana provided an excellent context in which to formulate and then test four principles of application.

The project includes a focus on the original applicational intent of the author—a topic that has received minimal treatment in the literature on application. It also explores the significance of what we have termed the “applicational trajectory” of the text (best seen in the distinct applications of Habakkuk 2:4 in its three appearances in the New Testament). It examines the current debate on deriving principles from the text. And it looks at how these principles might be contextualized to Turkana.

The project fieldwork includes observations as and discussions after the Turkana pastors preached, a quiz, presentation of a two-day a seminar titled “Principles of Application from Habakkuk,” a follow-up focus group, and personal interviews.

Leading the local church towards increased effectiveness in preaching and teaching Hebrew narratives

Author
Bryan David Anderson
Abstract
Effective narrative preaching takes a special set of hermeneutical tools. This project sought to increase the effectiveness of teaching and preaching Hebrew narratives in the local church via a five week seminar to equip participants in discovering the central thrust of Old Testament narratives. Goals and objectives were established, relevant data gathered, analyzed from volunteers. An analysis of the data revealed notable improvements in the participants' overall effectiveness in teaching narrative. Finally, lessons learned through the execution of the project have been processed and suggestions for improvement have been incorporated in the plans for leading the seminar in the future.

Exegesis to proclamation: an analysis of a hermeneutical methodology for preaching from Old Testament texts

Author
James M Harvey
Abstract
This project proposes a hermeneutical methodology designed to facilitate preaching from Old Testament texts of the Common Lectionary, testing the method with five Episcopal priests of the Diocese of Pennsylvania over a period of five months. Participants find renewed interest in preaching from the Old Testament, discovering increased relevance and understanding through application of the method advocated by the project.
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