Bible--Old Testament--Criticism, Literary

Prophetic Activism: Increasing the Academic Achievement Among Low Performing African-American Male Students at Mary B. Martin School

Author
Danny Anthony Everett D.Min.
Abstract
University Circle United Methodist Church in Cleveland, Ohio partnered with Mary B. Martin School to address academic achievement disparities for low performing African-American males. If students participate in faith and culturally based extended school programs, then their academic performance improves. Explorations from qualitative research during a church led after school program were expounded. The approach incorporated prophetic activism based on themes of spirituality, educational inequity, and social learning and critical race theories. The data suggests partnerships between churches and schools improve outcomes for African-American male students. A final project was submitted to the Doctoral Studies Committee at United Theological Seminary in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Ministry.

LET THE ANCIENT STORIES LIVE: USING NARRATIVE ANALYSIS AND A CHRIST-CENTERED HERMENEUTIC FOR PREACHING OLD TESTAMENT NARRATIVES

Author
Mark Pluimer D.Min.
Abstract
This project sought to increase the competence of preachers and Bible teachers to preach or teach from Old Testament narratives in a way that is both Christ-centered and faithful to the original intent of the narrative. To achieve this goal, the project explored mainly two key topics: narrative analysis and a Christ-centered hermeneutic. Guided by the principles and tools of narrative analysis, preachers and Bible teachers are able to discern the main message of narratives as originally intended by the biblical author. Guided by the principles and tools of a Christ-centered hermeneutic, preachers and Bible teachers are able to connect the message of narratives to Christ authentically, without distorting or violating the original intent of the narrative. These considerations of narrative analysis and a Christ-centered hermeneutic culminated in a working three-step method for handling Old Testament narratives faithfully in preaching or teaching.

The project implemented the proposed principles by developing a manual, the content of which was taught in a twelve-hour course to a group of preachers and Bible teachers. Pre-course competence was assessed and compared to post-course competence by means of a focus group, surveys, a course evaluation, and written work on assigned Old Testament narrative texts.

The results showed a demonstrable increase in competence among participants. The principles and tools presented in the manual/course were shown to be valuable for helping preachers and Bible teachers to preach or teach from Old Testament narratives in a way that is both Christ-centered and faithful to the original intent of the narrative.

The relationship between a preacher's understanding of the Old Testatment narrative literary genre . . . and the preacher's skill. .

Author
J Kent Edwards
Abstract
This project seeks to establish a correlation between enhanced understanding of the Old Testament narrative literary genre, as it influences both hermeneutics and homiletics, and improvement in preaching from OT narrative passages. The project conducts a course in OT narrative genre for a selected group of preachers, administering cognitive and practical tests related to the material and noting that as participants' understanding increased their skill in preaching from these texts improved.

A Bible college course entitled: preaching the Old Testament

Author
V Scott Bullerwell
Abstract
The project was designed to affirm the relevance of the Old Testament and enhance the skills in Old Testament sermon preparation among senior students at Eastern Pentecostal Bible College, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. Activity centered around: 1) matters relating to Old Testament authority and the adoption of a methodology; 2) a treatment of narrative, poetic and prophetic genres of literature; and 3) two preaching labs. Project results indicate that attitudes towards the Old Testament were consistently favourable, with limited differences between before/after and that skill levels in preparing to preach from the Old Testament changed dramatically in a positive direction.
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