Bible--Old Testament

A Phenomenology of Authentic Leadership

Author
Joshua James Tilley D.Min.
Abstract
Objective: To grasp the characteristics and essence of authentic leadership as seen and experienced through the lives of those who have served under and/or over those they perceive and identify as “authentic” or “high quality” leaders.

Method: A literary review and a biblical review were conducted to establish the current scholarship related to authentic leadership. A new phenomenological study was conducted in October of 2018. 12 individuals were interviewed either in person, by phone, or via a video chat.
Results: The result was a literary study, a biblical review, and a new phenomenological study of authentic leadership.

Conclusions: Through the phenomenology and subsequent qualitative research, the researcher came to the conclusion that authentic leadership is provided, felt, and acted upon in different ways by different people in different cultures, but the one universal essence of authentic leadership is the paradox of “relief” and “peace” preceded by a sense of “anxiety” and “pressure,” which is provoked within the follower by the leader. Trust is built through the process.
A model of existential peace is offered to demonstrate this meaning, but no model for creating an authentic leadership is presented as a phenomenology does not provide the groundwork needed to establish such a theory. All cultures represent leadership in different ways, so further research would need to be conducted to create such a model.

Developing a Battle Plan for Spiritual Warfare with the Men of Crossroads Presbyterian Church

Author
Donald Sampson D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to investigate the topic of spiritual warfare and assess the level of understanding of it among the men of a Presbyterian congregation in order to develop a plan to enable the men to engage in spiritual battles with the world, the flesh and the devil. The project included a biblical and theological study, followed by interviews with a select sample of men from the congregation. Qualitative analysis revealed some confusion over the phrase “spiritual warfare.” Additional themes that emerged from the interviews included a high degree of awareness of temptations of the flesh as an ongoing source of spiritual struggles and a strong belief that Satan is real. This latter belief was tempered by widespread uncertainty over the relevance of Satan, or any demonic influence, due to a very high conviction about the sovereignty of God. A recognition of the importance of enlisting other men for help in fighting spiritual battles was also a significant theme. While the men interviewed identified the value of having “battle buddy” type relationships, they readily acknowledged the absence of such relationships. Quantitative research via a confidential, online survey confirmed a low level of self-disclosure among the men of the congregation.

Preaching to the Heart: Investigating Theory and Practice Among Sydney Anglican Preachers

Author
Andrew Katay D.Min.
Abstract
This project explores the theory and practice of preaching to the heart. Biblically, the heart is a focal point both of the content of transformation in Christ, and the motivating power by which transformation takes place. To understand the nature and operations of the heart, first Scripture, and then secondarily three ‘theologians of the heart’ - Augustine, Aquinas and Jonathan Edwards - are examined. Subsequently, seven principles are elucidated to preach to the heart. This theory is used to analyze ten sermons from each of eight preachers. The study concludes with a program to better equip preachers to preach to the heart.

A STUDY OF SERMON APPLICATION ACROSS BIBLICAL GENRES AT FAITH BIBLE CHURCH

Author
Trevor Nunn D.Min.
Abstract
This project developed strategies to sermon application across the biblical genres of poetry, narrative, parables and epistles. The strategies had two goals: (1) enhance the congregants’ biblical understanding of the text while growing them in Christ; (2) improve the quality of sermon applications in the project writer’s preaching. To achieve these goals, this project reviewed hermeneutical topics to create a definition of expository preaching. Based on the definition, a questionnaire evaluated the success of the strategies through a pre/post format of the project writer’s sermons. Conclusions to their success were based upon positive or negative changes within the data.


Preaching Christ from the Old Testament at Concord Baptist Church, Chattanooga, Tennessee

Author
David M King
Abstract
The author sought to develop and apply a comprehensive Christocentric hermeneutic for preaching the Old Testament. The hermeneutical approaches of Bryan Chapell, Sidney Greidanus, and Graeme Goldsworthy were reviewed and evaluated. A synthesized hermeneutic was developed in which the author sought to capitalize on the strengths and minimize the weaknesses of the three approaches. The resultant hermeneutic was applied in a sermon series that included texts of various genres from the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings.

The Art of Storytelling: Developing Discernment in an Age of Distraction

Author
Mark A Hamby
Abstract
Through the art of storytelling, twelve instructional lessons of Wisdom lay the foundation for the development of discernment in relation to Wisdom and Folly. The categorically prescriptive truths of Proverbs 1:1-10:1, Ecclesiastes 12:9-14, 2 Peter 1:3-10, and Hebrews 5:8-14 will serve as the building blocks for the development of Christ-like character. Four goals of this research are: (1) an understanding of the fear of the Lord; (2) an increase in discernment when faced with Folly's promises of prosperity, prestige, protection, and pleasure; (3) an increased motivation to yield to correction; and (4) a yearning to seek Wisdom as hidden treasure.
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