Bible--New Testament--Study--Methodology

A STRATEGIC PLAN TO ENCOURAGE THE PURSUIT OF AN ACCREDITATION MODEL AMONG INDEPENDENT BAPTIST PASTORAL TRAINING INSTITUTIONS IN SPANISH-SPEAKING LATIN AMERICA

Author
Bruce Burkholder D.Min.
Abstract
Although independent Baptist pastoral training institutions have served the
Spanish-speaking church in Latin America for decades, most have become stagnated in academic development and institutional advancement. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategic plan that will encourage these institutions to pursue an accreditation model. This study identified five impediments to this pursuit.

1. Insufficient academic preparation of professors

2. Excessive government restrictions

3. Poor economic situation in country

4. Lack of interest/Lack of knowledge of benefits

5. Low academic level of students

This quantitative data was obtained through a Delphi survey of twenty-two individuals from three distinct subgroups: (1) Independent Baptist missionaries actively involved in pastoral training in Spanish-speaking Latin America, (2) Independent Baptist Hispanic pastors or professors who were trained in Latin America and who retain involvement in this ministry, and (3) Independent Baptist theological educators who have experience with the accreditation process. Through the Delphi survey the participants suggested the above-mentioned impediments to the pursuit of an accreditation model. The Delphi expert panel also provided qualitative data by sharing additional insight into the nature of the impediments through comments made within the survey and personal conversations with the author.

Once the five impediments had been identified a Delphi support team worked with the author to develop a strategic plan to address each impediment. Specific goals were set, and action steps were identified. Most importantly, the strategic plan encourages independent Baptist pastoral training institutions in Spanish-speaking Latin America to promptly initiate and to passionately pursue the core concepts of the accreditation model, specifically, the standardization of curriculum, external peer review and internal quality assessment.

The project concludes with recommendations to independent Baptist churches, ministries, and pastoral training institutions in both the United States and Spanish-speaking Latin America.

An Examination of Discipleship in Army Chapel Ministries Overseas

Author
Jesse McCullough D.Min.
Abstract
Military chapels face unique situations that churches do not. These circumstances complicate making Biblical disciples, especially in an overseas environment. As pastors called to preach the gospel and make disciples, Army chaplains must discern how to fulfill the command of Christ while also working as an Army staff officer. Measuring whether growth is occurring may provide information to help chaplains keep what is working and change what is not. This project is designed to gauge whether chapels in an overseas environment, specifically Germany, are truly making disciples in accordance with the Biblical mandate. The research combines context, theological basis, and surveys of congregants to attempt determining which factors contribute to growth and which are unimportant. Advice for lessons learned and further research are included.

Hearing to tell: listening for gospel inroads in the stories of non-Christians

Author
Jason M Abbott
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to understand how listening to the stories of non-Christians can be used to more strategically narrate gospel stories. In order to do this, a qualitative research project was designed. Six non-Christians were asked to share a significant story. Special attention was given to how feelings, events, imagined futures, and beliefs emerged in the stories. The researcher concluded that, by carefully listening to the stories of non-Christians, Christians can find many areas in which gospel stories can be helpfully told in the natural context.

The contextual and narrative uniqueness of the college and university experience captured through Bible study

Author
Malcolm L Frazier
Abstract
The title of the project is The contextual and narrative uniqueness of the college and university experience captured through Bible study. It is a ministerial tool used to address the lack of Bible study curriculum for college and university students. The theological framework is provided by validating the ecclesial nature of campus ministry, which is the context for the ministerial tool, and by examining the role of biblical narrative. The linkage to story is done by examining some different contexts in which story plays a role. This served to develop paradigms for the Bible studies. Attention is given to the importance of Christian education, and surveys were used to validate the need for the project.

Developing and using a biography of Jesus, a guide to order key events in his life

Author
Tom J Cowley
Abstract
The objective was to develop and utilize a study guide based upon overview models of events and experiences in the life of Jesus. Pilot tests and field experiences were among church Bible study groups. Findings include: the overview approach was well-received, users gained confidence facilitating studies and sharing events from the life of Jesus, sharing among participants was good, and users felt a closer relationship with Jesus. The author published a book, A Biography of Jesus [copyright symbol], and will explore broader use of this guide to order events in the life of Jesus among all age groups and audiences.

Connectional learning: a curriculum design to help students remember, apply, and value the New Testament teachings

Author
Carlan D Helgeson
Abstract
Using recent discoveries of brain-based research about the process of memory-making, as well as biblical and historical Christian understandings of teaching, the author derives six principles of learning out of which he develops a new curriculum for a New Testament survey course at the college level. Emphasis is given to visual and kinesthetic methods which help students remember, apply, and value the teachings of the New Testament in an effort to combat biblical illiteracy. An evaluation of the curriculum demonstrates increased student interest and excitement over the course, as well as increased retention and personal application of the content learned.

An inductive Bible study handbook on the Gospel according to John relevant for the Christian school setting

Author
Steven M Waterman
Abstract
This project proposes and prepares a systematic study of the Gospel According to John for students in Christian schools, emphasizing study of the Bible itself rather than study of books about the Bible. The method stimulates high-level, critical thinking, encourages enthusiastic class participation, and guides students to practical application of Scripture to life situations. The project tests this inductive approach in a Christian school setting.

Using a relief map of the Holy Land in adult biblical education

Author
William P Sanders
Abstract
This project proposes a geographical and audiovisual learning approach to adult biblical education, using a three-dimensional relief map of the Holy Land in a six-week unit on "The Life and Land of Jesus Based on the Gospel of Luke." Drawing on biblical, educational, cartographical, and historical-geographical research, and evaluated by written instruments and oral interviews, the project demonstrates that presenting biblical materials in combination with a relief map provides an understandable, interesting, and stimulating approach to biblical education for adults.
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