Bible--New Testament--Criticism, interpretation

A Biblical Examination of an Ontological reading of Theology, in Trinity, in the [Christian] Believer and in Church

Author
Erwin Samuel Henderson Dr Ph.D.
Abstract
Ontological theology considered in some theological works, was given little significance as a primary theme. The thesis attempts to restore prominence and cohesion of an ontological construct, whereby function and structure, are the subordinate product defined by the ontological theological perspective. The effects are far reaching for theological definitions of the essential nature of the Trinity, the believer and the church; representing a paradigmatic shift in theological understanding, affecting profoundly the nature existential Christocentric Christianity.
The ontological theology of Trinity contrasts with the relational subordination, authority-submission proponents and opponents, in substance, in relationship and in function. The recovery of apostolicity as an ontological attribute of Godhead provides significant insight and cohesion to the ontological Trinitarian proposal.
The effects upon the believer ontologically are contrasted with the religious disposition and the positional judicial approach to salvation. The prototypical shift occurs in the Person of Jesus-Christ to an existential reality originated in Trinity and replicated ontologically in the believer. The nature of humankind is thereby reinterpreted giving definition to the “spiritual man” as the sole form of legitimate existence that is biblically normalized and warranted.
The ontological primacy provides an alternate construct to the historical structural understanding of church that has not changed since the early patristic period. The proposal emerging from this exegesis is a model of church: ontological and apostolic, originated, [re]sourced, and incarnate from the nature of Trinity, demonstrating undeniably that it is impossible for the Church of divine intent to exist outside of the three persons of the Godhead. Christo-centricity restores Church to the origin, source and 'telos'. Present day observations may exemplify distanciation of contemporary expressions of church from ontological definitions. A return to source represents a theological and ecclesiastic field of renewal to perpetuate in the coming years.

Developing an Understanding of the Way People in my Ministry Context Read and Interpret the Bible

Author
Dieuner Joseph Rev D.Min.
Abstract
Developing an Understanding of the Way People in my Ministry Context Read and Interpret the Bible provides an in-depth assessment of biblical interpretation at an African American church through an ethnographic analysis. The research not only offers a systematic approach for examining the relationship between biblical interpretation and spiritual growth in that congregation, it also explores how the African American cultural context of the members of the congregation guides the way they read the Bible and what role prejudice and discrimination against African Americans play in shaping the members’ interpretation of the Bible. Moreover, it examines their understanding of biblical authority and how that understanding impacts the way they apply scripture in their daily lives to enhance their spirituality.

Do you hear what I hear? Analyzing laity responses

Author
Gary L Hughes
Abstract
Do people hear many different relevant messages from the same text? The author used ethnographic research methods. This included surveys of clergy and taped responses of laity. There were eight lay persons and seven clergy that took part in this study. The author used to text in the gospel of Mark. We examined Mark 1:9-20 and Mark 16: 1-8.I listened to the responses of laity and the clergy. I then analysed each response. After the author reflected on the laity responses. I then preached both texts in two small contexts, the church and the mission in which I work.The author's conclusion is that people hear many different messages from the same text. Mark Allan Powell writes in his book, What shall they Hear? that "in the moment of hearing a the text preached and read the listener has the power to choose what to do with our words." Again, the author's research supports the small study that people take away different meanings based on race, economic status, religious affiliation and gender.

Training the deacons of First Baptist Church Dangerfield, Texas, to manage conflict

Author
Randel N Trull
Abstract
The author researched five biblical passages (John 17:20-23; Matthew 7:1-5; 18:15-17; Galatians 6:1-5, 10; and Acts 6:1-7) and three practical topics (conflict management styles, active listening, and mediation principles and techniques). The project involved five three-hour sessions that also touched on the topics of conflict theory, personal peacemaking, self-control in conflict situations, and family systems theory. The project focuses on deacons as conflict managers because of their character, office, and work.

The Apostle Paul's owning of the shadow in Romans 7:14-25: a Jungian reading and missiological implications

Author
Seeyong Lee
Abstract
This study presents a Jungian interpretation of the Apostle Paul's shadow in Rom. 7:14-25, and finds the text's missiological implications for Christian maturity. The shadow is an in-divisible part of becoming a whole person. In light of Jung's view that there is no wholeness without shadow, Paul's owning of the shadow reveals a crucial movement of becoming a mature Christian. Paul's ultimate mission goal is to be transformed into the image of Christ (2 Cor. 3:18), and Rom. 7:14-25 is an example of the ongoing dynamic journey of integrating the shadow and Christ in the transformation process.

Preliminary studies for a training manual for deacons in a Korean-American church

Author
Chong Soo Lim
Abstract
This thesis project presents the author's research on the origin of the "diaconate" in preparation for writing a manual for use in the Korean-American church. Korean scholars to date follow an old tradition which derives "diakonos" from "dia" (through) and "konis" (dust.) But this derivation is a case of confusion of "diakonio" (pulvere, to in the dust) with "diakoneo" (to serve.) The author exegetes Acts 6 discussing the Grecian Jews, the Hebrews, and the Samaritans. Finally a study of the "diaconate" in church history is presented including the qualifications from Acts 6:3 and I Timothy 3:8-13.

The incarnation in missiological education: some proposals for an Australian curriculum

Author
James Richard Kime
Abstract
Missiological reflection on the incarnation of Jesus implies an incarnational-servant approach to mission. Using a survey of missiological literature, an examination of the christological background and three models of the incarnation developed from Johannine, Pauline and Matthean literature, a concept of incarnational mission is formed and applied to Australia as described in its historical, social and religious setting. This is then used to propose a new course for and changes to the missiological curriculum at an Australian Baptist seminary so that the concept permeates the curriculum as a critical principle for the validity of mission.
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