Bible--Matthew

An Examination of Discipleship in Army Chapel Ministries Overseas

Author
Jesse McCullough D.Min.
Abstract
Military chapels face unique situations that churches do not. These circumstances complicate making Biblical disciples, especially in an overseas environment. As pastors called to preach the gospel and make disciples, Army chaplains must discern how to fulfill the command of Christ while also working as an Army staff officer. Measuring whether growth is occurring may provide information to help chaplains keep what is working and change what is not. This project is designed to gauge whether chapels in an overseas environment, specifically Germany, are truly making disciples in accordance with the Biblical mandate. The research combines context, theological basis, and surveys of congregants to attempt determining which factors contribute to growth and which are unimportant. Advice for lessons learned and further research are included.

Apostolic Women Religious in the United States and Their Legacy

Author
Janice J Brown O.P. D.Min.
Abstract
The legacy of Jesus has manifested itself among different populations, within different cultures, and during different times. This thesis-project looks at this manifestation as it unfolds as the legacy of apostolic women religious in the United States. The legacy of each participating congregation was described as a mission or more specifically as the mission of Jesus. It has also been the experience of these women religious that legacy is most tangible in the relationships and trust they built with their students, coworkers, and community members with whom they worked and partnered.
The legacy of apostolic women religious is a witness to the gospel message that took root as Christianity two thousand years ago. The thesis-project begins by exploring the legacy of Jesus, as well as the historical context that furthers God’s mission through the lives of three historical women – Hildegard of Bingen, Catherine of Siena, and Angela Merici. The research then flows into the brief history of the Ursuline Sisters in the United States. Reviewing the pre and post-Vatican II eras and their influence on religious life helps lay a foundation upon which apostolic women today have been formed.
The primary data was gathered through focus group discussions involving seven congregations consisting of thirty-five apostolic women religious. Their comments are summarized first by congregation in order to maintain the richness within each discussion, then by main themes, and concluded with a reflection on the legacy of these women as it finds meaning through the Gospel of John.
Legacy has many definitions, but what surfaced most prominently was legacy as ministry, and the ministries are what define the women. Legacy efforts included developing relationships, education, healing, inclusivity, and service. All of these works could be imagined as the ongoing narrative of the Gospels, epitomized in the Beloved Disciple.

Relational Christian Education: A theology and repertoire for teaching obedience to the commands of Christ

Author
Lawrence Cole
Abstract
How is the church to fulfill Christ's mandate to teach obedience to all he has commanded? From the Great Commission of Matt. 28:18-20 disciples are mandated to teach relational Christian education. Historically church leadership has been negligent in understanding this mandate. As derived from the Great Commandment in Matt. 22:35-40, Christian education is to teach obedience based on relations more than regulations. These relations originate from the Godhead's trinitarian relationships. Using James Fowler's faith development framework because of its relational qualities, a repertoire (program of action), rather than a taxonomy, was designed to provide relational goals for the teacher and learner.

Transformation happens at the margins: shaping beatitudinal character of volunteers by embracing excluded, marginalized, inconvenient others at drop-in centres

Author
Benjamin C Platz
Abstract
Jesus said "you cannot serve two masters." Yet, in the Western, Middle-Class Church (marked by syncretism) the world's ways (which exclude "inconvenient others") conflict with Jesus' ways (of embracing them). Consequentially, many Christians do not demonstrate Beatitudinal Character, the attributes of Matthew 5:3-10. Using Action Research, 11 drop-in centre volunteers, over 3 sites, were interviewed and surveyed. Auto-ethnographic analysis revealed that engaging those inconvenient to us could help in overcoming obstacles of comfort, self-reflection and incongruent orthodoxy, orthokardia and orthopraxy; in this way a disciple's character can be aligned with Christ's, helping the Church to regain an authentic mission.

Encountering the son of God: discipleship transformation through a journey in the gospel of Matthew

Author
Frederick H Merkes
Abstract
The purpose of this research is to evaluate cognitive, affective, and behavioral impact of a sixteen-week discipleship program on the participants using pre-, mid-, and post-project interviews. The field for this discipleship is the literary structure of the gospel of Matthew. The participants were five disciple-makers within the Trinity United Methodist Church of Gibsonburg, Ohio. Results showed evident changes stimulated mostly by the curriculum: the gospel of Matthew, varied settings for the classes, a modified version of the 4MAT during the sessions, and the immediate application of the classes to small group leadership.

A Bible quiz discipleship manual for youth in the Missionary Church

Author
Alan G Yerke
Abstract
A discipleship manual was prepared for teenagers in the Missionary Church Bible quizzing program. Quizzing, a competitive team activity, encourages youth to learn the content of Scripture. This manual, with its thirteen lessons and leader's guide, covered Matthew 1-12 and was designed as a tool for discipling quizzers with both the interpretation and application of the text. By offering sound teaching, a Christian perspective on competition, and by structuring the program into the overall youth ministry of the church, the coach, as a positive role model, can effectively disciple his team.

A Matthean critique of the contributions of the mission of the church to the task of ecumenism in the local setting

Author
Gerald L Mansholt
Abstract
The writer contends that the church in mission to needy neighbors contributes to the ecumenical task of the church. Orthopraxy as well as orthodoxy contributes to the quest for unity. The writer employs a methodology first proposed by liberation theologian Gustavo Gutierrez, namely, doing critical reflection upon the praxis of people in light of the Word of God. Using extensive quotations from interviews, the writer critically reflects upon a local, social, and ecumenical ministry in light of seven Matthean themes present in Matthew 25:31-46.
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