Bible--Luke-Acts

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Eschatological discernment: baptism, table fellowship, and prayer as formative communal practices in Luke-Acts

Author
Julie Ann Johnson
Abstract
This project proposes that the formative communal practices of baptism, table fellowship, and prayer found in the Gospel of Luke and book of Acts offer Christians then and now the same possibilities of holy, eschatological discernment that results in mission and ministry. The project's weekend retreat seeks to embody for contemporary Christians the triadic relationship between the Spirit, the Kingdom of God, and the community's practices that is revealed in Luke-Acts.

Conversion of the purse: a sermon series on money and possessions from Luke/Acts

Author
George H McConnel
Abstract
As Martin Luther observed, "Three conversions are necessary: conversion of the heart, conversion of the mind, and conversion of the purse." Conversion of the purse is most difficult for most mainline Protestants in the 1990s. This project preaches a series of seven sermons from Luke/Acts to elicit "conversion of the purse." The texts are Lk 4:16-30, Lk 19:1-10, Lk 11:1-4, Lk 12:13-21, Acts 4:32-5:11, Acts 19:23-41 and Lk 6:20-26, which offer a variety of literary form and content. The sermons ask: Does God side with the poor? Can a rich person be saved? When is enough enough? Does life consist in the abundance of one's possessions? Is the choice between giving and dying? Is the way we make our money as important to stewardship as the way we spend our money? Are the poor really blessed? Exegesis draws from Luke Timothy Johnson, theology from Robert Farrar Capon, Richard J. Foster, and Douglas John Hall, and homiletical method from Fred B Craddock and Thomas G Long.

Water, wheat, and wine: the sacraments of baptism and eucharist in the Luke/Acts community as a paradigm for modern christian worship

Author
George R Crisp
Abstract
The Christian church of the twentieth century is fragmented and distant from its first century origins. Major divisions in the church have altered liturgical practices, especially the ritual observance of the sacraments of baptism and Eucharist. Early Christian worship reflected in the gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts reveals the religious experiences of the church in the last third of the first century. To the extent that they can be recovered, this project reveals how the sacramental practices of baptism and Eucharist were formative in the Luke/Acts community, how they evolved through twenty centuries of Christianity, and how they present a paradigm for modern Christian worship. This project addresses these issues through library research into the nature of Christian origins, ritual theory, and early Christian worship, coupled with reflections upon experiences in pastoral ministry within the United Methodist Church.

God and/or mammon: a congregational dialogue concerning the theological and ethical implications of Luke/Acts for affluent Christians

Author
Bruce W Hanstedt
Abstract
The thesis of this project is that the gospel has the potential to create a new community that will serve as a catalyst for hope and justice in our present global context of affluence and poverty. The project provides a model for congregations which tests the thesis. The study addresses: 1) the current divergence of wealth, with a special focus on the enculturation of American churches; 2) work and social stresses concomitant with wealth; and 3) the biblical message concerning wealth. Issues of affluence, ways to address these issues to the wealthy, and instances of the "new" community permeate this project.
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