United States

Case Studies of Multiple Executive Staff Leadership in the Local Church

Author
Matthew Clifton Gillum D.Min.
Abstract
As the local church grows bigger, the need also arises to manage that growth
well. At the executive level of leadership in the church, the question of excellence in
leadership must be addressed. Some churches have chosen to pursue that excellence via
the means of multiple executive staff leadership in the church. This function looks like
multiple staff members who wield executive leadership ability with a direct report to the
Senior Pastor.

This dissertation examines cases of churches that utilize this structure of
multiple executive staff members. Multiple executive leadership in the local church can
be effective when these following four factors are in place: a commitment to the church’s
vision and senior leadership, clearly defined roles in the ministry team, strategic hiring of
personnel, and flexibility of administration. These four factors were present in all of the
multiple executive staff teams interviewed. While the structure is not a one-size fits all
approach, it can be a helpful way of managing and continuing growth in the local church.

Using Luke's Slave Metaphor to Teach the Biblical Foundations for Financial Stewardship at First Baptist Church of Buffalo Gap, Texas

Author
Charles Leon Gililland
Abstract
This project evaluated whether a financial stewardship study built around Christ-centered stewardship principles (derived from Luke’s servant parables employing slavery metaphor) instead of practical financial planning could affect change in small group members' financial stewardship habits at First Baptist Church of Buffalo Gap, Texas.
Chapter 1 introduces the financial problem facing the Church today even in the midst of the American financial recovery, and the thesis of the project is presented. In addition, the theological background for the study with exegetical analysis of the Lukan parables is presented.
Chapter 2 outlines the project research plan and methodology. A weekly progress report is also included in this chapter.
Chapter 3 presents the qualitative and quantitative project analysis gathered from both a pre- and post-study survey and a pre- and post-study financial giving report. The chapter concludes with an executive summary that outlines the positive change in group members' habits and suggestions for further implementation of the project.

A study of critical care nurses' listening behavior through the application of the quality listening model

Author
D Clare Biedenharn D.Min.
Abstract
Listening is a quality indicator in patient-centered care. Working within the paradigm of the Quaker listening model, as described by activist and educator Parker J. Palmer and others, the intentional use of a spiritually based therapeutic listening model is an effective tool used by the Registered Nurse (RN) in working with patients and their families in making decisions in critical care settings. This project seeks to gauge the outcome of intentional use of this proven and effective model by the RN as both a tool for improving patient care as well as personal spiritual awareness measured through the Daily Religious Experience Scale.

Measuring the Effectiveness of Equipping Families Using a Sermon-Based Curriculum at Fellowship Bible Church in Jacksonville, Texas

Author
Graham Hale D.Min.
Abstract
The aim of this project was to measure the effectiveness of using a sermon-based curriculum to combat biblical illiteracy and equip family shepherds for the work of home ministry. The two focus groups for this project at Fellowship Bible Church of Jacksonville, Texas, were the Sermon-Only Group and the Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group. The Sermon-Only Group listened to four sermons through the book of Zephaniah (selected because of its length, unfamiliarity, and gospel themes). The Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group listened to the sermons and also participated in a four-week, twenty-lesson study on Zephaniah in the home. The two groups were tested on their retention and application of what was taught from the book.

The thesis of this project was that parents and children in the Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group would retain more of the Word of God and more faithfully apply the Word when compared to the Sermon-Only Group.

Chapter 1 addresses the problem of biblical illiteracy while also introducing the thesis. Chapter 2 makes an argument in favor of home discipleship both biblically and historically. Chapter 3 makes an argument biblically and practically for sermon-based instruction, introducing and explaining the effectiveness of using sermon-based curriculum in the home. Chapter 4 explains the preparation for and execution of the ministry project at FBC of Jacksonville. Chapter 5 includes a report on the findings from the project. In this chapter, the project director evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the project and what he would do differently in hindsight.

Toward an Effective Pastoral Mentoring Strategy:
E. K. Bailey’s Training of Prospective Pastoral Candidates

Author
Felix Caston D.Min.
Abstract
This dissertation examines the pastoral mentoring strategy utilized by E. K. Bailey at Concord Baptist Church to train young preachers to become pastors.
Chapter 1 introduces E. K. Bailey and provides his ministry credentials. It also establishes the need for training preachers to be resourceful in serving churches of a new generation.
Chapter 2 shares Bailey’s biography and gives a synopsis of his life while documenting experiences, accomplishments, and individuals that shaped his life.
Chapter 3 gives an overview of Bailey’s Ministry Strategy, including development, implementation, and goals.
Chapter 4 includes an analysis of Bailey’s Ministry Strategy. An examination is done of the target of his ministry and the expected outcome.
Chapter 5 examines the implementation of Bailey’s Ministry Strategy at Concord Baptist Church, along with an assessment of how it impacted Concord.
Chapter 6 concludes the dissertation and offers areas for further research, as well as, recommendations how this dissertation can be used by pastors in preparing young preachers to become pastors.

A Pastoral Approach to Preaching Difficult Texts

Author
Brian James Lays D.Min.
Abstract
This project proposes that preaching difficult texts with pastoral sensitivity can produce edifying sermons, proving useful certain texts of the Bible which have been excluded from the lectionary and thereby written off as irrelevant or even harmful to the Church. Six challenging biblical texts, from Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, Isaiah, Matthew, and Acts, none of which appear in the Revised Common Lectionary, are presented to a focus group for study and feedback. Utilizing data from the focus group, a sermon will be prepared from each text, and the focus group will evaluate whether or not each sermon proved the challenging biblical text useful.

IMPLEMENTING A COACHING-BASED DISCIPLE MAKING STRATEGY AT CHRIST CENTERED COMMUNITY

Author
Joseph Paul Kim D.Min.
Abstract
This project will implement a coaching-based disciple making strategy by using the Discipleship Training Relationship [DTR] curriculum. Chapter 1 presents the theological foundation for the projects. This chapter focuses on the nature of making disciples, the transformation of the heart, and Christian coaching. The purpose of this project is to implement a disciple making strategy at Christ Centered Community [CCC] by using the DTR curriculum.
Chapter 2 describes the ministry plan and implementation of the DTR curriculum. The plan includes three components: curriculum preparation, implantation, and evaluation. The implantation consists of four parts: Purpose, opening, lesson, and assessment for each week. The purpose and opening provide a general idea for each lesson. The lesson covers the highlights of the lesson plan. The assessment covers the reaction of the students and the project leader’s observation of the students as each lesson was taught.
Chapter 3 supplies a critical evaluation of the project leader’s objectives and the student’s objectives. Lastly, it introduces the accomplishment of the goals and the future plans for the DTR curriculum.

From Ecclesial Ruin to the Blessed Hope: The Connection between John Nelson Darby's Ecclesiology and His Dispensational Theology in His Sermons

Author
Stephen Mark Fulmer D.Min.
Abstract
The author examined how the preaching of John Nelson Darby demonstrate a correlation between his ecclesiology and the formation of his dispensational theology. A total of 15 of Darby’s sermons were reviewed within the context of five eschatological themes: (1) the ruin and apostasy of the church, (2) a call to separation and holiness, (3) the blessed hope – Christ’s soon return, (4) the coming eschatological judgment, (5) the church as the bride of Christ. The author concludes that Darby’s sermons are an important resource that reveals that his ecclesiology and his eschatology are developed in a profoundly interconnected manner and reinforce one another.

A Critical Analysis of the Transmission of the Gospel to Spaniards by the Evangelical Church in Madrid

Author
Wilson Fernando Dantas Soaris D.Min.
Abstract
Although the numbers show people responding positively to the Gospel in Spain, the Autochthonous People of Spain [APS] and congregations composed of Spaniards are not following the same pattern. The reason for considerable growth in the nation without necessarily reaching the APS is due to the number of immigrants living in Spain, especially from Latin America.
This dissertation investigates the EC in the Autonomous Community of Madrid [ACM] from its beginnings and its methods used to transmit the Gospel to unbelievers, especially among the APS. The analysis seeks to determine why the majority of the ECs in Madrid do not have many APS congregants.

Prophetic Activism: Increasing the Academic Achievement Among Low Performing African-American Male Students at Mary B. Martin School

Author
Danny Anthony Everett D.Min.
Abstract
University Circle United Methodist Church in Cleveland, Ohio partnered with Mary B. Martin School to address academic achievement disparities for low performing African-American males. If students participate in faith and culturally based extended school programs, then their academic performance improves. Explorations from qualitative research during a church led after school program were expounded. The approach incorporated prophetic activism based on themes of spirituality, educational inequity, and social learning and critical race theories. The data suggests partnerships between churches and schools improve outcomes for African-American male students. A final project was submitted to the Doctoral Studies Committee at United Theological Seminary in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Ministry.
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