United States

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Witness, mercy, life together as the framework for mission

Author
Steven D. Schave
Abstract
The thesis for this project was two-fold: 1) We can use the marks that Martin Luther wrote of as the basis for how we define church to a core group. 2) A developed resource entitled Witness, Mercy, and Life Together can be used as the framework for mission. The project’s research involved a combination of meetings, in depth study, and surveys of Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod church planters. The researcher concluded that Luther’s marks of the church can be a tool to developing Lutheran identity, and that the witness, mercy, life together resource is a successful planning tool for church planting.

BEST PREACHING PRACTICES IN HOMILETIC PROGRAMS IN ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGATES IN THE UNITED STATES

Author
Stephen C Bosso
Abstract
The Second Vatican Council emphasized preaching in the Roman Catholic tradition as a liturgical act. As this emphasis on preaching has become increasingly more important, reflected by post-conciliar documents and statements by the popes following the council, the question remains: has the seminary curriculum changed with this emphasis to ensure that the clergy are properly trained for preaching. This research project reviews the literature of evaluation of preaching over the last three decades along with the changes in requirements for homiletics in the five editions of the Program of Priestly Formation. The author developed a research tool using Appreciative Inquiry and interviewed homiletics professors at six Roman Catholic theologates in the United States to aggregate the "best preaching practices" in these homiletics programs. The aggregated results demonstrate that in fact improvements have been made in the preaching programs. Hopefully, the aggregate of b est practices in homiletics programs of Roman Catholic theologates interviewed will encourage all Roman Catholic seminaries to work continuously to improve their homiletics programs for better preaching from the pulpits of their alumni for the people of God.
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