South Carolina

Chaplain Spiritual Assessment and Its Efficacy for the Palliative Care Team at Roper St. Francis Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary-Phenomenologic Inquiry

Author
Yhanco Monet
Abstract
A qualitative phenomenological research methodology was designed and implemented to answer the question: what is it that chaplains assessed which is perceived as useful for the Roper St. Francis Palliative Care team? Twelve Palliative Care practitioners, representing diverse specialties, were interviewed and surveyed to answer the research question. Evidence suggested that spiritual care and chaplaincy assessments were perceived as relevant to the Roper St. Francis’ Palliative Care praxis. However, the gathered data indicates that chaplains and Palliative Care practitioners would benefit from a more standardized/consistent spiritual assessment practice. A set of “Teaching Guidelines” and educational “Activities” was created with the goal of training chaplains in the art of doing Palliative Care spiritual assessments based on the research findings. A certified ACPE supervisor was interviewed about the viability and appropriateness of these “Teaching Guidelines” and “Activities.” This professional educator enriched the educative proposal and validated its potential to train staff chaplains as Palliative Care practitioners.

Meditation and Contemplation: Framework for a Coping Mechanism Among Small Groups at the Mount Moriah Baptist Church in Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
Gary W. Jordan
Abstract
“Don’t say God is silent if your Bible is closed.” - Church Sign This project aimed to encourage and enable a small group class at Mount Moriah Baptist Church to adopt meditative and contemplative prayer as a framework for a coping mechanism. In practicing this type of prayer life, participants anticipated to receive the benefit of being better able to cope with stressors of life. Utilizing a small group study, Lectio Divina, biblical examples, breathing techniques and various surveys, participants were enabled to experience a deeper interaction with Scripture, aided by the ministry of the Holy Spirit, to hear God speaking to them and transforming their lives to the image of Christ.

Practicing Sabbath to Reduce Stress Among Ministers in the Tyger River Baptist Association, Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
James Hailstock
Abstract
The Sabbath is the zenith of God’s creation and the climax of living. The key to reducing stress among ministers is the Sabbath lifestyle which includes practicing the disciplines of prayer, silence, feasting and fellowshipping in addition to identifying the signs and symptoms of stress. The Sabbath lifestyle empowers ministers with coping skills that can be personalized and implemented consistently as they progress and deal with the daunting demands and responsibilities of ministry. This project tested and compared the stress levels of the research and control groups before and after teaching four courses (disciplines) in the context of a Sabbath lifestyle to the research group only. During the retreat, four activities relative to the four courses were practiced by the research and control groups to determine if the courses had an impact on the activities to reduce stress among ministers. The project also revealed the effectiveness of the instructor, research site, courses, retreat, and activities. The project revealed strengths, weaknesses, and missteps. The results established that the courses did influence the activities to reduce stress among ministers.

Transforming Attitudes and Commitment to Missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Greenville, South Carolina

Author
Jermaine A Boyce
Abstract
This ministry project's goal was to seek transformation in attitudes and commitment to missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Greenville, South Carolina. The goal of transformation was to guide the congregation's mission practices to be exemplary of its 'Missionary' name and the overall mission of the church as discovered in Luke-Acts and in the Abrahamic Covenant.

The project tested the attitudes and commitment to missions from the Missionary Society in comparison to the general congregation. The project revealed both strengths and weaknesses in the attitudes and commitments of the Missionary Society and the congregation about missions. The research from the project revealed that there were strong contradictions between the findings from the surveys completed by the project participants and the content from the discussions during the training exercises. One of the three primary goals was achieved outright, and several secondary goals emerged as a result of the project; particularly the creation of a strategic plan to assess and evaluate the future mission practices of the church.

Discovery Project for a non-violent offender Reentry at Valley Brook Church Pelzer SC

Author
Hubert Jr Jones
Abstract
This project discovered the knowledge, attitudes, and actions of Christian believers regarding the start of a non violent ex-offender reentry program at Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church in Pelzer, South Carolina. I used a five point Likert scale survey questionnaire. Forty-five participants completed the survey that consisted of 35 questions. The data revealed the participants' willingness to support the start of a reentry program. However, the data also revealed there are some doubts about the facility and availability of funds. The areas of concern need further research to discover ways to start a non-violent ex- offender reentry program at Valley Brook Church.

Ain't you got a right to the tree of life: the heirs' property dilemma on Johns Island, South Carolina

Author
Robin Dease
Abstract
The tradition of inherited land possession is as old as the biblical story. African Americans are losing their heirs' property on John's Island at an alarming rate. The story of Naboth's vinyard (I Kings 21) serves as a model to discuss the effects that wealth and those with social power have on this land loss. The author uses articles, reports, and books on the history of African Americans in the gullah culture provides a biblical understanding of land possession, and challenges the church to practice faithful Christian stewardship in order to reverse this land loss.

A pastoral care model for spiritual growth in correctional facilities with emphasis on South Carolina corrections

Author
Reid Ross White
Abstract
This project proposes, implements, and evaluates a model process--including sermon series, biblical and theological instruction, pastoral and crisis counseling, teaching sessions, and community inmate support groups--to promote spiritual growth among prisoners incarcerated by the South Carolina Department of Corrections. The model brings about renewal, redemption, and rehabilitation in corrections.
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