Malawi

A Biblical Examination of an Ontological reading of Theology, in Trinity, in the [Christian] Believer and in Church

Author
Erwin Samuel Henderson Dr Ph.D.
Abstract
Ontological theology considered in some theological works, was given little significance as a primary theme. The thesis attempts to restore prominence and cohesion of an ontological construct, whereby function and structure, are the subordinate product defined by the ontological theological perspective. The effects are far reaching for theological definitions of the essential nature of the Trinity, the believer and the church; representing a paradigmatic shift in theological understanding, affecting profoundly the nature existential Christocentric Christianity.
The ontological theology of Trinity contrasts with the relational subordination, authority-submission proponents and opponents, in substance, in relationship and in function. The recovery of apostolicity as an ontological attribute of Godhead provides significant insight and cohesion to the ontological Trinitarian proposal.
The effects upon the believer ontologically are contrasted with the religious disposition and the positional judicial approach to salvation. The prototypical shift occurs in the Person of Jesus-Christ to an existential reality originated in Trinity and replicated ontologically in the believer. The nature of humankind is thereby reinterpreted giving definition to the “spiritual man” as the sole form of legitimate existence that is biblically normalized and warranted.
The ontological primacy provides an alternate construct to the historical structural understanding of church that has not changed since the early patristic period. The proposal emerging from this exegesis is a model of church: ontological and apostolic, originated, [re]sourced, and incarnate from the nature of Trinity, demonstrating undeniably that it is impossible for the Church of divine intent to exist outside of the three persons of the Godhead. Christo-centricity restores Church to the origin, source and 'telos'. Present day observations may exemplify distanciation of contemporary expressions of church from ontological definitions. A return to source represents a theological and ecclesiastic field of renewal to perpetuate in the coming years.

A Contextual Biblical Oral Curriculum for the Training of Illiterate and Semi-Literate Pastors in Malawi

Author
Roy Nantoka
Abstract
The author researched if the illiterate and semi-literate pastors of Malawi could biblically be trained by means of an indigenous oral educational system already existent in their societies. The question he asks in this research is: Should those who are answering an apparent divine call to the ordained ministry and seek biblical training first be required to learn reading and writing before matriculation? The researcher persuasively argues that employing indigenous means of oral training is adequate to biblically train the illiterate pastors of Malawi.

Developing and implementing a training program to enhance the leadership skills of pastors and church leaders in Malawi, Africa

Author
Bobbie Rue Scott
Abstract
In the training program the author taught instructional material on the biblical concepts of leadership poositions and servanthood leadership styles. The program stressed the leader's responsibilities of leading, planning, and decision making; the leader's responsibility to meet the psychological, sociological, and self-acualization needs of his or her followers; and the leader's responsibility to use appropriate leadership styles. Seventy-three percent of the forty-two participants scored seventy or above on the daily tests. Forty-one participants worked in a ministry project. Each participant expressed changes in his or her life and ministry due to the training sessions.

The development of the Eleventh Hour Institute to be used as a means of mobilizing, training, and sending missions workers from Malawi and nearby countries to unreached peoples

Author
Lazarus M Chakwera
Abstract
The project was a description of the development of a School of Missions - Eleventh Hour Institute. The school was established to help mobilize, train and send missions workers from Malawi and the surrounding nations to unreached peoples. Using historiography and interviews, consultations and evaluation surveys, this development was traced through the school's phases: needs assessment, curriculum design and implementation. The findings indicated an overwhelming need for such a school of mission. There were calls for a multifaceted nature of the overall endeavor, such as content, context, pedagogy and partnership.
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