Worship

Searching for the meaning of worship

Author
James C Logan
Abstract
The goal of this project was to become more aware of the meaning of worship. We often worship without knowing the reasons that underlie the act. Therefore, we miss the essential point of what worship means for us as individuals within the community of faith. The project sought to discover as many of these meanings as possible. Research included reading and the author's reflection on his own experience of worship. Worship touches us in many ways and we should respond accordingly by realizing that worship is obedient love in action.

Clergy and lay together in public ceremonies

Author
Robert R Smythe
Abstract
Both ordained and non-ordained Christians come together as mutual celebrants in public ceremonies as an expression of the whole ministry of the church. These ceremonies are dynamic and energizing. They are the deepest level of life where God's presence is celebrated. Ordained and non-ordained church members need to come to grips with the theological implications of the ceremonies and increase skills for public leadership of ceremonies. Barriers which prevent many non-ordained persons from full participation are examined. The project involved questionnaires, worshops, retreats and an evaluation. The ministry on worship department worked closely with the pastor. Self-esteem is one issue that must be taken into account as the congregation seeks to involve the non-ordained in public ceremonies. The involvement of the non-ordained is not only a theological issue but a recognition of the gifts and intelligence of all believers in the fellowship.

Entire sanctification and prayers of confession

Author
Richard H Neiderhiser
Abstract
This project contains a section on "The Review of Related Literature" which covers the doctrine and practice of entire sanctification which outlines what constitutes transgression in the life of those who claim the experience of entire sanctification or Christian perfection. It reviews the thoughts and expressions of some of John Wesley's immediate successors as well as an overview of Nazarene teaching on the subject.

Worship: biblical principles and human motivations

Author
David W Gaffron
Abstract
The goal of this project is to help persons understand the worship experiences of the local church. The author outlines 1) the biblical foundation for worship, 2) an understanding of the contemporary view of worship, and 3) the motivations of human beings for worship in light of the insights of Paul W Pruyser's theory of motivations for worship and the psychodynamics of worship. He establishes how the congregation's worship in his local church reflects the three areas explored. The author teaches a course based on the materials. He surveys the class before and after the course. The evidence indicates that an educational experience can make a difference in understanding and attitudes.

The Psalms in Christian worship: singing, praying and preaching from the Psalter

Author
Lyle Edward Harper
Abstract
This project addresses several questions. Can the Psalter continue to be our "School of Prayer" and teach pastor and congregation how to pray? Can the Psalms be listened to as the Word of God? Can the constant and strong appearance of praise and joy in the Psalms transform congregational worship and bring greater awareness of God's presence and person? The long and significant faith tradition shows that the Psalms do indeed speak for us to God and to us from God. The liturgical venture challenges the congregation and pastor to experience the Psalms as our song and prayer book and as the Word of God.

The corporate prayers of worship

Author
Stanley D Self
Abstract
The author traces the roots of corporate prayer in the scriptures, the intertestamental period and the apostolic period up to the Reformation, particularly in the thought of Calvin. Although there are no clearly recognizable liturgical prayers in the Bible, there is much evidence in the lives (and times) of such notable persons as Abraham, Moses, David, Jesus, Paul, James, John, Peter and the writer of Hebrews to indicate that set prayers were a part of corporate worship. The author recognizes certain types of liturgical prayer, such as invocation, adoration, confession, thanksgiving, supplication, and intercession, and then encourages diligent preparation in mind and heart and-or in the writing of these prayers by the worship leader.

Small groups in the service of the community as a model for congregational participation in worship

Author
David Erwin Avery
Abstract
This project attempted to bring the praxis and the stated centrality of worship closer together within a small church setting. Two small groups decided upon issues, gathered resources and presented two worship services each. Chaburah, the house church and basic Christian communities were used as models. The project used a questionnaire, evaluation forms and informal conversations to evaluate its effectiveness. Reality was confronted, barriers were overcome, community was fostered, mutual understanding was enhanced and the biblical heritage was taken seriously. However, the project showed that there is a continuing need to bring together praxis and theology.

Children and inclusive worship

Author
David Ng
Abstract
This project looks at inclusive worship which takes its lead from children, learns from children, but which is holistic and includes everyone and their individual pilgrimages. It surveys literature covering an historical range from early to very recent studies on the theology and history of worship and sacramental practice. The project studies three Pentecost services and their levels of worship experimentation by using an evaluative questionnaire. These demonstrate that while people want traditional worship events, they experience worship within non-traditional worship approaches. This study develops a theory for expanding worship from traditional to non-traditional approaches.

Children's sermons: communicating with the congregation

Author
Horace T Allen
Abstract
Some pastors question the value of children's sermons. Other pastors are not opposed to children's sermons but have not yet delivered one themselves. Still other pastors preach a children's sermon on a regular basis, but do not feel confident that they are doing it properly. This project is intended to speak to these pastors, by offering help and guidance by: 1) responding to the concerns of the critics of the children's sermon; 2) sharing what lay persons (including children) and pastors have found to be helpful, or problematic, about the children's sermon; 3) offering criteria which should be considered by the preacher to children; 4) providing examples of children's sermons; and 5) dealing with some of the developmental and liturgical issues related to the children's sermon.

Enriched worship

Author
Raymond Lytle
Abstract
After a good many changes had been made, we prepared a questionnaire to obtain congregational reaction to them and to help us plan future actions. This type of an approach should make it easier for newly-appointed pastors to effect change, as well as those who have been serving a church for several years.
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