Worship

Trinitarian worship in a local church

Author
Keith M Curran
Abstract
Understanding the theological atmosphere of a church is vital to successful ministry. A new minister would do well to discover the theological climate as soon as possible and compare the church's theological biases in light of a Reformed theology of worship. Worship leadership that strives to be theologically inclusive will be based on understanding the object of worship as the God we know as Trinity. Theological categories based on the Trinity serve as reference points to the different biases worshippers and worship leaders bring to the worship. Over-emphasis on one of the Persons of the Trinity excludes other worshippers who desire to worship God in God's fullness. Theologically inclusive worship is planned, presented and reviewed by active church members. A Trinitarian model is used to evaluate the act of ministry. The success of the project indicates that future discussion by the larger church can be helpful in attempts to design and understand congregational biases in worship and a Reformed theology of worship. It can also help those interested in discovering compatibility of a new or potential minister and congregation.

An experiment in worship renewal in a Korean church

Author
Kwang-Min Hwang
Abstract
The worship in most Korean churches has been intellectual and moralistic preaching-centered worship, and it fails to involve the congregation wholeheartedly. Although the basic ethos of the Korean people is exulted spirit, they cannot experience this in such worship. To overcome this problem, a lively worship model, based on research on the theology and history of Christian worship, and on relevant aspects of Korean culture, was developed and utilized for three months in the Masan Bahn-seok Methodist Church. Its effectiveness was tested with pre- and posttest questionnaires, which showed that the model contributed to the people's faith development and to the renewal of worship itself.

Africanizing worship in the mission churches of Africa

Author
Richard E Brown-Whale
Abstract
Beginning with the premise that worship communicates and informs theology, this study examines the issues involved in integrating contextual African theologies with concerns for contextualizing worship. This is a library study. Traditional African religion and culture, the independent African churches, African Christian theology, and the principles of liturgical theology are employed in order to examine what is involved in Africanizing worship. The study concludes that true Africanization must integrate concerns for cultural indigenization and political liberation, and that Africanized worship must reflect this integration. It further suggests that Africanized Christianity has much to contribute to the global church.

Celebrating God's grace: an adult information course which teaches the doctrine of the church as expressed in the worship of the church

Author
James W Heining
Abstract
The author thoroughly studied the ongoing relationship of worship and doctrine as an influence in the formation of Lutheran worship practices. He developed a class entitled "Celebrating God's Grace," which summarized the basic teachings of the church as they are expressed in the worship of the church. This was part of a revamped adult education program in his congregation. In addition to the obvious benefits for those attending the class, the writer came to better understand the centrality of grace in the Christian faith and is now better able to plan and lead worship.

Interpersonal ministry in the liturgy

Author
Wesley M Toncre
Abstract
This dissertation/project explores the Scriptures, the Lutheran confessions, the tradition of the Fathers and contemporary ecclesiastical thinking in search of a definition of the role of the worshiper--as an instrument of the God who serves--in the context of Lutheran, corporate, liturgical worship. Further, it develops a workshop structure designed to provide members of a congregation with the knowledge, attitudes, skills and opportunities to discover and execute those roles by serving one another effectively in response to God's ministry to them while they are gathered around Word and Sacrament.

Meaningful worship: a seminar to enrich the corporate worship experience using a worship committee

Author
Dale R Suel
Abstract
The paper includes a teaching plan for a weekend seminar on worship, plus eight lectures on worship. The opinions of the participants were expressed and recorded through the use of questionnaires and surveys. Because worship is to be an eternal activity, it is good to learn about it thoroughly in order to perform it properly. The author discovered that it was possible to lead a congregation into a more meaningful experience of worship after serious study and intentional adjustments to the previous expressions of the congregation's worship.

Memories shared, new visions revealed: a study of the role of biblical narrative & worship in the renewal of congregational memory & vision

Author
Deborah A Rundlett
Abstract
Liturgy has the power to reclaim memory and call forth new visions through the retelling of the biblical and living stories. One of the biggest challenges faced by mainline churches today is moving beyond decline. When faithful, the liturgy of Word and Sacrament incorporates biblical and living memories in such a way as to challenge and even reshape a community's understanding of self. Through the convergence of congregational memory and biblical narrative, questions of faithfulness are raised that healing might take place and the congregation come once again to entrust their future to God and God's vision of shalom.

Designing and implementing worship services to meet the expressed needs of baby boomers in Denton, Texas

Author
David A Sylvester
Abstract
This project sought to ascertain the expressed needs of churched and unchurched individuals between the ages of 28 and 46 years and to develop and implement worship services to effectively address the needs as expressed. This project justified the premise that individual-expressed needs may be effectively addressed without altering or neglecting any portion of the gospel message.

That the fruit might be perfected: liturgical catechesis and a local church curriculum

Author
T Randall Smith
Abstract
The author proposes that a division has arisen in the life of the church between the liturgical, or worship, dimension of the community of faith and its catechesis, or community-forming, dimension. This division has weakened the church's ability to witness for the gospel. After examining several modern attempts to overcome this problem, the author adopts one of these attempts, the faith community approach, and proposes to use it in a modified form to examine the curriculum of a local congregation. Using an understanding of curriculum advanced by Maria Harris and Susanne Johnson, the author defines curriculum as "the whole life of the Church as it is manifested in a congregation's worship, instruction, and praxis in explicit, implicit, and unacknowledged ways." The author seeks to indicate how a local congregation's life would be impacted by such a definition and understanding to create what the author calls liturgical catechesis. Finally, the author examines the implications of liturgical catechesis for pastors, local congregations, seminaries, and judicatories, and offers some theological reflections on the subject.

Worship and personality types

Author
David F Lindblom
Abstract
Because people differ in regard to the way in which they use the psychic functions of their personalities, they relate to the various dimensions of worship in different ways and intensities. To demonstrate this thesis, people were chosen randomly from six Lutheran congregations of various sizes and contexts for ministry. Each person was given the Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator and a worship questionnaire. The scores of these instruments were standardized and correlated, and the statistical evidence supported the thesis. The implications of this study for a congregation's evangelism and worship planning are manifold. When worship leaders are more sensitive to the variety of people and their personality types, they will plan more holistic liturgies.
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