Worship

Using a ministry team in leading a congregation to understand and integrate worship as a lifestyle

Author
Kenneth M Hendrix
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to use a ministry team to lead our congregation in a study of worship over forty days and then to challenge them to apply what they have learned. A daily devotional journal related to each Sunday's teaching was given to participants. Sunday's theme and message centered on a truth about worship and were reinforced in small group studies. This paper includes a discussion of the design of the project based upon the research presented; the specific objectives; the procedures and methods used; the project implementation; the lessons learned and findings related to the objectives and outcomes of the project; and a brief conclusion.

The Christian Center for the Arts/Centro Cristiano para las Artes: a case study in developing urban worship leaders to witness to the Shalom of the reign of God

Author
Janet L McMurry
Abstract
The Christian Center for the Arts/Centro Cristiano para las Artes or CCA was created to be a resource for spiritually nurturing and training artists and for helping the quantitative and qualitative growth of the church through art and media-related ministries. To more effectively develop urban worship leaders, this work will consider both the positive and negative systemic effects of contemporary worship practices, comparing and contrasting them with the church's history and theology of leitourgia. It will explore biblical and theological reasons for supporting the contributions of both the church of the past as well as the present. This work will conclude with strategies for furthering worship renewal in the urban context. In particular, viable options for educating and training worship leaders, visual and performing artists, and pastors in all phases of leitourgia and developing an artist's fellowship will be offered.

The advent of visual arts in worship: a ministry tool for today's worship planner

Author
Ann Parsons Adams
Abstract
Attempting to plan worship, compose a bulletin, write a sermon, or create a PowerpointTM presentation using the visual arts in a theological context, the author discovered that she could not find what she wanted and what was found had little theological depth. In this paper, the author has designed a ministry tool that improves upon the existing visual arts worship resources by providing background information and theological observations for the visual art used in the Advent C cycle of lectionary preaching. The result complements the biblical texts with visual images to enrich our experience, interaction, and relationship with the Divine.

Beyond entertainment: children as leaders of worship

Author
Anna Virginia Dempsey
Abstract
At Briarcliff Baptist Church, children have been seen as entertainers and not as leaders of worship. This project focuses on children reclaiming roles of leadership from the early church and using these roles to be leaders of the modern church. The roles of children in the early church are explored, and current developmental perspectives of children are examined. A study is conducted of children and their leadership in worship employing the roles of children from the early church. A thorough evaluation is held after the study to see which of the roles meet the modern developmental standards.

Learning to worship better: teaching worship leaders the Biblical foundations and art of planning for worship at First Baptist Church, Port Orchard, Washington

Author
Jamie D Greening
Abstract
This ministry project sought to change the attitudes and actions of those who participate in worship planning at First Baptist Church in Port Orchard, Washington. The project director researched worship planning and theology and wrote a seven week curriculum designed to teach about biblical worship and worship planning. He taught it to nine people. Effectiveness was measured using pre-tests, post-tests, class evaluations, worship service evaluations by an outside expert, focus groups, journal, and a follow-up interview. The results were that participants learned, were enriched, and subsequently took an active role in worship planning.

Pastor, can we talk? Leading collaborative worship planning in dialogue with the arts

Author
Sharon Lorraine Barley
Abstract
It is my thesis that it is not primarily different worship styles expressed in the same church that cause division and tensions, but, rather, the lack of collaborative and strategic planning for the leaders and the congregation to undergird change with theological continuity and unity of purpose. The narrative case study reflects on the process of gathering a team of artists around a single vision and practicing dialogue through collaborative worship planning. The result was a synthesis between theology and the arts that connected old forms and liturgy to new contemporary expressions, deepening worship with theological unity in diverse expressions.

With arms wide open to a new millennium: preaching and worship in the digital age

Author
James S Burns
Abstract
This thesis explores how preaching and worship can adapt to the effects of electronic communication in how people receive and process information, which is especially observable in the millennial generation. It is recommended that preachers make five strategic shifts: from performance to participation, from authoritarian to authentic, from isolated to integrated, from verbal to visual, and from stabilization to subversion. A model emerges where worship design pays equal attention to word, music, and image.

Becoming God's people of promise: facilitating increased commitment through worship

Author
Janet B Winslow
Abstract
Worship within a vibrant faith community provides an essential commonplace for the development and support of committed mutual relationships with God and others. However, social values and responsibilities, increased leisure opportunities, and a misunderstanding of God's covenant reduce member commitment towards worship attendance and church involvement. Therefore, this project reframes the worship experience and strategically designs ritual to transform spectators into participants and to inspire less active members to responsive commitment to our committed God.

Incarnational worship

Author
David Kirk Shelor
Abstract
Worship, patterned after the incarnation of Jesus Christ, must both express itself missionally in ways that are reflective of the culture of its participants, as well as provide transformative experiences that empower the missional identity of the worshiping community. Through intentional preaching and worship, guided study for both the congregation and its leadership, and restructuring of the worship planning process, an understanding of "incarnational worship" began to be fostered within a new church development and became integral to its self-identity, resulting in more vital worship and greater mission activity by the congregation collectively and its members individually.
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