Worship

Educating Calvary Baptist Church, Asheville, NC, on the Value of Following the Christian Year as a Means for Spiritual Renewal Through Worship

Author
Jeffrey C. Hayes
Abstract
This project introduced the spiritual value of following the Christian year in worship. Through a series of sermons and study lessons that focused on eight major seasons (Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Holy Week, Easter, Pentecost, and Ordinary Time), participants were exposed to the history and spiritual purpose of each, respectively. Two surveys were administered, along with weekly evaluations, and interviews, to measure the project’s effectiveness. The desired outcome was a greater degree of knowledge and interest in worshipping through the Christian year. According to the final analysis, increased understanding, spiritual growth, and desire to worship through the Christian year did occur.

Assessing the Effect of Worship Education and Worship Renewal at First Baptist Church Kings Mountain, North Carolina

Author
Jonathan Bundon
Abstract
For many Christians, worship has been reduced to the entertainment value centered on self rather than the Triune God. Ignorance must be combated with worship education and worship renewal. For the worshiper, how one prepares for corporate worship affects their worship experience and informs their private worship. The four-week study, Spirit and Truth, introduced members of First Baptist Church Kings Mountain to worship education and renewal and challenged them to assess their own worship practices. Quantitative and qualitative test results and observations validated this project's needs. In addition, the project afforded opportunities that might contribute to a life-long experiment of maturing in worship. The project evidence supports further study of worship education and worship renewal in the church. For many Christians, worship has been reduced to the entertainment value centered on self rather than the Triune God. Ignorance must be combated with worship education and worship renewal. For the worshiper, how one prepares for corporate worship affects their worship experience and informs their private worship. The four-week study, Spirit and Truth, introduced members of First Baptist Church Kings Mountain to worship education and renewal and challenged them to assess their own worship practices. Quantitative and qualitative test results and observations validated this project's needs. In addition, the project afforded opportunities that might contribute to a life-long experiment of maturing in worship. The project evidence supports further study of worship education and worship renewal in the church.

Enriching Christian Hospitality at Malaby's Crossroads Missionary Baptist Church in Knightdale, North Carolina

Author
Barbara Starr Barner
Abstract
Hospitality is the welcoming of strangers, family, and friends. In the early biblical and historical traditions, hospitality focused on welcoming the alien and extending resources to them. Hospitality, however, need not be limited to the basic physical needs of the stranger, but spiritual needs are to be addressed as well. In the reflection of Jesus’ work on the cross, Christian hospitality should be the intentional, responsible, and caring act of welcoming or visiting strangers, enemies, the distressed, downtrodden, without regard for reciprocation. The goal of this project was to enhance Malaby’s Christian hospitality culture and take our personal interactions to a higher spiritual level, thereby, nurturing, caring, and maturing the body of Christ. The ultimate goal of this study was to have this work be an available tool to address similar church congregations that need to create or enhance a positive culture of Christian hospitality.

Incorporating giving as an integral part of worship at Blessed Harvest Institute of Charlotte, North Carolina

Author
Brian Gerard Fite
Abstract
Giving is one of the most effective forms of worship we have available to us, but it has become the most exploitive and misunderstood element of the worship service. The methods and language used to frame giving within worship have led to exploitation resulting in unwillingness to wholeheartedly participate in giving as an element of worship. The literature addressing giving and the biblical interpretations are lacking in accurately speaking to the issues that arise in applying Old and New Testament scripture to address giving as an element of worship. There are a growing number of articles attempting to address the covetous nature involved in the methods and language used in inviting people to give to God. This work evaluated the giving practice in Blessed Harvest Institute by evaluating some Old and New Testament scriptures and determining how the interpretations are to be applied in the methods and language used to frame the giving experience in the worship service. Leviticus 27:30-33, Deuteronomy 14:22-29, Malachi 3, Acts 3-5, 2 Corinthians 8-9, and other scriptures were used to understand the methods and language of giving biblically. Giving is to be a freewill expression of worship executed in an environment of liberty. It is necessary to reframe the concept of tithing not to be an obligation but a personal choice to express worship to God. Any prompting will remove worship from giving. Worship is a free expression that must be voluntary; therefore, giving must be voluntarily expressed, not grudgingly, by compulsion or of necessity, in order to be an element of worship.

Pray for reign : the eschatological Elijah in James 5:17-18

Author
James Marion Darlack
Abstract
James uses the prophet Elijah as an example of righteous prayer. This thesis explores the possibility that James may have intended his readers to recognize both historical and eschatological imagery associated with the biblical prophet. First, it shows that in early Jewish literature the eschatological and historical Elijah traditions were not held in isolation of each other. Imagery from descriptions of Elijah’s eschatological return is used to describe the pre-ascension ministry of the prophet, while the eschatological mission of the prophet is described using elements of the historical narrative. Second, the thesis demonstrates that James’ prescript “to the twelve tribes of the Dispersion,” sets a tone of inaugurated and yet-to-be-consumated eschatology, and that the mention of Elijah helps form an eschatological inclusio that frames the letter. Third, the New Testament use use of Elijah’s drought outside of James is explored showing again that elements from the Elijah’s drought in 1 Kings were used in eschatological contexts, and that Elijah’s three and a half year drought, as mentioned by James, is used to illustrate a period of judgment for the sake of effecting repentance in these contexts. Fourth and finally, the images of rain and drought are viewed through an eschatological lens, revealing their role as covenant blessing and curse, and eschatological judgment and restoration. It is concluded that James’ readers could have recognized the eschatological implications of using Elijah as an example of faithful, righteous prayer, and that James assigns his readers a role similar to that of the eschatological prophet. They are called to endure in the midst of eschatological trials and to effect repentance before the arrival of the soon-coming King.

A study of the First Corinthians from the viewpoint of balance and the pastoral balance required in Tampa Korean Evangelical Church

Author
Byunguk Lee
Abstract
This paper is about the project I have tried in hopes of preventing another church split after taking a position as the senior pastor at a church that has scars of division. For seven Wednesday worship services, I chose 1 Corinthians as the main text for the sermons. Then the contents of sermons were developed into Bible study materials for different ministry groups. I approached the 1 Corinthians from the perspective of balance. I prepared my weekly messages based on passages with the principle of balance.

From Sitting Around the Table to Setting the Table A New Approach to Church Council Meetings

Author
Eric C Schlichting
Abstract
Stepping into leadership on a church council is a challenging calling. This project demonstrates that the ministry of worship can be used to offer church council members a more clearly focused and more richly rewarding experience of serving in leadership. This intervention introduced a format for meetings based on a pattern for worship, and through mixed-methods research, affirmed that a meeting modeled on worship improves council members' sense of purpose, sense of effectiveness and sense of satisfaction.

The Church as Family Worshipping in Unconventional Settings

Author
Janice L Six
Abstract
The project created opportunities for small group communal worship in unconventional settings among children and adults. The purpose was to identify the ways worship contributes to an awareness of God's presence in all places, and to the understanding of the church as family. The prominent research method employed was the pro-active research method wherein the researcher and participants were actively engaged with one another in a transformative process. As a result, communal worship is understood as an attitude of the heart, and when the Holy Spirit simultaneously tugs at the heart-strings of young and old alike kinship is nurtured.

Revitalization and reconciliation of worship in the Southern District Convocation of the United Holy Church of America

Author
Charles E Lewis
Abstract
One of the basic features of church life in the United Holy Church (UHC) is the proliferation of worship and music. The purpose of the thesis entitled "Revitalization and Reconciliation of Worship in the Southern District Convocation of the United Church of America" give you an idea the authors desire to aid in revitalization and restoration of worship within the United Holy Church so that a practical theology of worship can be developed, incorporating traditional devotional-style worship and contemporary-style praise and worship. The author's objective in this project begins with identification of the two scopes of worship, traditional devotional-style worship, with its focus on spontaneous worship, and contemporary praise and worship, with its emphasis on a rehearsed worship. The content of this thesis project involves identifying the problem and its setting and presenting a theological framework, literature review, methodology of research, and outcome of the project. Throughout this project the authors' focus is the need to embrace both styles of worship will be shown with the hope of revitalizing worship so that believers and seekers will sense a real worship experience.

Musical instruments and musicians in the worship of the Canadian Reformed Churches

Author
Theodore E Lodder
Abstract
In the Canadian Reformed Churches there is both a shortage of qualified organists and a growing number of musicians who play musical instruments other than the organ, resulting in much discussion and debate about which musical instruments are the most appropriate for worship. A lack of biblical awareness and leadership concerning music in worship, combined with limited or mediocre resources and training, cultural influences, and other factors, have contributed to the present situation. This study explores, analyzes, and critiques this situation on the basis of biblical-theological and confessionally Reformed principles, taking into consideration the historical, philosophical, practical, and pastoral factors related to musical instruments and musicians in worship.
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