Theology, Practical

Church planting: responsibilities and ministry

Author
Jerry Back
Abstract
This dissertation-project examines the theological and practical foundations of an effective church planting ministry. It defines the responsibilities of a church planting agency, clarifies basic resources for church planting together with the methods for securing these resources, and seeks to identify the responsibilities of the church planter. Counsel is offered for dealing with the myriad problems arising from such a strategic task.

Basic purposes of the church and their implementation

Author
Warren Lee Fleischmann
Abstract
Teaching, fellowship, worship, and prayer are four basic purposes of the church, essential to its existence. These things require implementation through programs which develop bold character and effective witness.

Guidelines for counselors in the local church

Author
Robert C Burnett
Abstract
This dissertation-project is prepared for pastors to use in training laymen for a ministry of counseling. The basic concepts should be adapted to the prevailing situations. Five chapters relate the following aspects of the subject. Chapter one introduces the subject and includes a statement of need with two directives. Chapter two presents a philosophy of Christian counseling. Chapter three outlines the personal and spiritual development of Christian counselors. Chapter four deals with the relationship of the counselor to the counselee. Chapter five delineates processes which develop the procedural skills of the counselor. Counseling fosters maturity in both the counselor and the counselee.

Holding up their hands

Author
Thomas L Lucas
Abstract
Administrative support not only makes ministry more meaningful and effective, but it is actually ministry in and of itself. The scope of this project includes a survey of scriptural passages that support the need for administrative ministry, pertinent theological issues, and a description of instruments developed and used to demonstrate and test administrative ministry. These instruments were in the form of a resource guide for the chaplains. Church administration is a prime example of practical theology at work. There is a definite ministry in administration. Administration should be a team effort. Training in administrative/management skills is very beneficial and should be done as a part of a well-rounded religious program was the conclusion drawn by the researcher.

A conceptual model designed to show ministry in a wholistic context

Author
Roger Harry Spinney
Abstract
This is a model building study based upon the images of Jesus in the New Testament as the one who brings wholeness to life. Systems theory and biblical theology are integrated to provide a more effective leading of the church in its ministry. The model is made up of six units. They are called the proclamation unit, the valuing unit, the symbolizing unit, the learning/growth unit, the sustaining unit, and the reparative unit. The study concludes with an observation on the practical value of model building and how specifically this model can be used.

Pastoral dimensions of health care

Author
Arthur J Gotjen
Abstract
The nature and expectation of pastoral responsibility for health care were explored in this study conducted in Somerset County, Penna. Physiological and theological aspects of the processes of healing and wholeness were discussed. In addition nurses were polled concerning their opinions about the pastor's role in health care. The surveys indicated that visiting, worship (prayer and sacraments) and counseling were the most important roles of the pastor in relation to a health crisis. In a post test survey these activities were seen by the laity as a significant part of a person's treatment towards healing. The result was an increased concern for enabling pastors to fulfill their role by both health care professionals and the church.

Clergy leadership roles in planned change

Author
David H Andrews
Abstract
This project/thesis explores the nature of clergy leadership in change-agent functions as a part of Christian ministry. The nature of change and the need for creative planned change leads to development of biblical and theological rationale for change in the Christian context. Using the conceptual model of a six-element process (motivation and preparation, analysis and diagnosis, goal-setting, strategy formulation, action, and evaluation), fourteen pastors of local churches engaged in change-oriented projects which were then reported and evaluated with particular respect to clergy leadership roles.

The daily office and its possibilities for the United Methodist Church

Author
Rodney M Damico
Abstract
The daily office, a system of non-sacramental services celebrated at specific times each day and night, has existed in some form since the 4th century. For many centuries the daily office played an important role in the spiritual life of Christians. Through a long history of adornment and complications the office was taken away from the people, and nothing has been developed to take its place. The possibilities for its renewal are evidenced by several successful experiments with the office in local churches. To make its renewal more possible, the author prepared a new office for United Methodists which is in keeping with the tradition while being sensitive to the contemporary situation.

Initiating a caring network in the congregation

Author
Alvar W Gustafson
Abstract
The project encompasses an effort to develop and direct the abilities and skills of lay members of the congregation in a ministry of concern for the homebound, the hospitalized, the troubled, and the inactive member. The practice of caring draws upon biblical resources, process thought, behavioral science insights, and is carried out in the context of a systems view of the church through the means of specialized role for a maintaining-sustaining-reparative subsystem. The process of the project details the selection, motivation and training of lay caring leaders in communication and listening skills, in calling and visitation, and in developing neighborhood areas as caring cells.

Building the program before building the building

Author
Donald G Fishel
Abstract
The author sought to discover a way to lead his congregation through a process of building the program before building the building. This project was accomplished by the author with the help of his congregation by developing a statement of mission and purpose. Goals for continuing ministries developed from that statement then led to the necessity of expanding the facilities and, in this case, completely relocating them. The new facilities were consecrated in June, 1981, with over half of the total cost paid. Without going through the process outlined in the author's document, this project would never have been completed.
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