Theological seminaries--Curriculum

Developing a biblical discipleship course that transforms seminary students to fulfill the Great Commission

Author
Mark M Cancel D.Min.
Abstract
The focus of this study is the development and evaluation of a Biblical Discipleship Course at a seminary designed equip students to make disciples in obedience to the Great Commission. In developing the Biblical Discipleship Course, the theological framework and doctrinal implications of the Great Commission Matthew 28:18–20 were identified and discussed. This course was designed to be objective based, transformative and motivational driven with several schools of thought on this subject were used in its development. The assertions of two hypotheses of this study were satisfied and upheld, by collected research and analysis. A Seminary Level Biblical Discipleship Course can transform students into makers of disciples in fulfillment of the Great Commission. Change in spiritual attitudes and commitment affects making disciples.

A CONTEXTUAL AND CULTURAL ADULT EDUCATION MODEL FOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN THE ARAB MIDDLE EAST

Author
Joseph Nehemiah D.Min.
Abstract
With the growth of the church in North Africa comes the need to train pastors and leaders. This project defines a biblically-rooted, contextually- and culturally-appropriate framework for training believers from Muslim background (BMB) leaders in an Arab context. The framework uses adult education (andragogy) principles from Bloom, Knowles, and Kolb that contribute to deep learning. Principles are evaluated using Hofstede's Arabic cluster cultural dimensions (Power Distance Index, Uncertainty Avoidance Index, Collectivism) and GLOBE leadership traits. This project defines cultural and contextual educational principles that put the design and implementation of developing and training leaders into the hands of BMB leaders.

The author believes it is important to hear from local leaders. The coalescence of cultural educational principles with the practical experience of local leaders allows for a practical educational framework. North African leaders were interviewed to discover how God developed them as leaders. The results reveal the importance of character, teaching, practical experience, and community with a mentor playing a significant role. The author suggests cultural and contextual principles and models to deliver training in non-traditional and non-formal ways.

THE INTEGRATION OF A DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING PROGRAM IN BIBLE COLLEGE CURRICULA TO PROMOTE DISCIPLESHIP IN THE INDIAN CHURCHES

Author
Titus Eapen D.Min.
Abstract
The principal purpose of this project is to observe if discipleship training at the Bible school level will impact the lives of the participants for increased involvement in discipleship activities at the ministry level in the context of churches in India. This project anticipates that proper discipleship training for future pastors and church planters in Bible schools will significantly influence discipleship activity in the church. This study seeks to understand the nature of Biblical discipleship and develop a workbook coursepack to teach final year Bible college students.

In order to understand the effectiveness of the discipleship course during the final year of Bible college studies on discipleship activities in the initial year of church ministry, a one-week intensive discipleship course was taught to a total of forty-five final year students from two different Bible colleges. A pre-test evaluation was conducted prior to the discipleship course, and post-test evaluation was conducted six months after graduation.

This study brought into focus several truths. Comparison of the pre-test and post-test responses revealed that a discipleship course during the final year of Bible College education would positively influence students in discipleship activities in ministry level. Confidence level in getting involved in discipleship activities also exponentially increased because of the training. Overall understanding and awareness of the topic also greatly increased. Therefore, theological institutions need to make it a priority to ensure that their graduates are properly equipped and trained in the field of discipleship prior to graduation.

A STRATEGIC PLAN TO ENCOURAGE THE PURSUIT OF AN ACCREDITATION MODEL AMONG INDEPENDENT BAPTIST PASTORAL TRAINING INSTITUTIONS IN SPANISH-SPEAKING LATIN AMERICA

Author
Bruce Burkholder D.Min.
Abstract
Although independent Baptist pastoral training institutions have served the
Spanish-speaking church in Latin America for decades, most have become stagnated in academic development and institutional advancement. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategic plan that will encourage these institutions to pursue an accreditation model. This study identified five impediments to this pursuit.

1. Insufficient academic preparation of professors

2. Excessive government restrictions

3. Poor economic situation in country

4. Lack of interest/Lack of knowledge of benefits

5. Low academic level of students

This quantitative data was obtained through a Delphi survey of twenty-two individuals from three distinct subgroups: (1) Independent Baptist missionaries actively involved in pastoral training in Spanish-speaking Latin America, (2) Independent Baptist Hispanic pastors or professors who were trained in Latin America and who retain involvement in this ministry, and (3) Independent Baptist theological educators who have experience with the accreditation process. Through the Delphi survey the participants suggested the above-mentioned impediments to the pursuit of an accreditation model. The Delphi expert panel also provided qualitative data by sharing additional insight into the nature of the impediments through comments made within the survey and personal conversations with the author.

Once the five impediments had been identified a Delphi support team worked with the author to develop a strategic plan to address each impediment. Specific goals were set, and action steps were identified. Most importantly, the strategic plan encourages independent Baptist pastoral training institutions in Spanish-speaking Latin America to promptly initiate and to passionately pursue the core concepts of the accreditation model, specifically, the standardization of curriculum, external peer review and internal quality assessment.

The project concludes with recommendations to independent Baptist churches, ministries, and pastoral training institutions in both the United States and Spanish-speaking Latin America.

Andragogy and the Most Effective Means of Forming Permanent Deacons in the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in the Twenty-First Century in the United States

Author
Victor E Puscas Jr. M.A.
Abstract
This thesis-project explores the most effective means of forming men for the permanent diaconate in the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States for the twenty-first century. It specifically addresses adult learning paradigms known as “andragogy” as opposed to the more familiar pediatric learning paradigms known as “pedagogy.” The principles of andragogy are then applied to permanent diaconate formation models in an effort to develop the most effective means. Factored in to the development of these means are the qualitative and quantitative data collected from deacons around the country and in particular, the deacons and their wives from the Diocese of Joliet (Illinois).

Positioning an international partner Lutheran church seminary for accreditation : a critical analysis of a proposed procedure for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Ghana Lutheran Seminary, Ghana, West Africa

Author
Steven R. Schumacher
Abstract
There is both a need and interest in attaining accreditation for theological education programs by Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod partner church seminaries in Africa. By means of a critical analysis a proposed procedure for The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Ghana (ELCG) Lutheran Seminary was prepared by the author. He assessed the current student population and ELCG ordained pastors through means of tracking GPAs, personal interviews, surveys and questionnaires to discover academic and cultural needs in preparing for the pastoral ministry. Through his discoveries, the author presents a theological basis for the rationale to acquire accreditation through an African independent Christian association.

A description of students' development in conceptual interpretation of leadership theory and theology in the pastoral ministry course: Leadership theory and theology

Author
Jay A Held
Abstract
The thesis addressed the problem of students' cognitive integration of leadership theory and theology. This holistic case study included students in the fall 2014 Theory and Theology of Leadership class at Multnomah Bible College. It used a process that provided students with leadership theory, theology, practice, modeling, evaluation and feedback. A process of triangulation was engaged with five different sets of data. The research resulted in four implications for the instructor to better help develop students' capacity for cognitive integration of leadership theory and theology and two implications surfaced for future research.

Optimizing translation training at Canada Institute of Linguistics

Author
Edward D Trick
Abstract
This project has two major components. One consists of a detailed and systematic review of the content of twelve central courses currently being taught at the Canada Institute of Linguistics as part of a program of training for the role of "Translation Specialist." The content of each of these courses is mapped to a set of competencies expected of those who are to serve in this role. The other component consists of an analysis of survey results in which translation specialists, their supervisors and mother-tongue translators reflect on actual field performance and the effectiveness of prefield training in preparation for fieldwork. The project concludes with specific recommendations for CanIL, and general suggestions for other SIL training programs who may consider a similar approach to program review.

A design for continuing education in biblical holiness preaching

Author
Duane C Brush
Abstract
The problem facing preachers in the Church of the Nazarene of how to clearly and convincingly proclaim the biblical call to holy living is explored, A survey was conducted to examine the challenges faced in preaching and teaching biblical holiness. Major problem areas identified include the language used to describe biblical holiness and how to apply the subject to contemporary audiences. To address these problems a model continuing education course was designed and presented. Both pre- and postcourse evaluations of participants were conducted. Recommendations include a program of training and continuing education for Nazarene preachers in methods of biblical exegesis and application related to the effective proclamation of biblical holiness.

An exploratory study of hybrid course management in homiletics in theological education

Author
Octavia Ann Baker
Abstract
This is an exploratory study of students' reactions to a hybrid homiletics course. The goals of the study were twofold: (1) assist in the design and implementation of a prototype hybrid preaching course; and (2) conduct the study to determine students' reactions to the design and implementation of the course. Two questions framed the study to ascertain students' feelings regarding how the course was designed to deliver content: (1) How would students react to a prototype hybrid course in preaching? (2) What recommendations would students offer to enhance learning and improve future hybrid course development? Data was collected by electronic survey, focus groups and individual interviews. The data confirms that course design (1) is essential to ensure optimal learning for students, (2) is essential for students to perform well in a hybrid course, (3) is directly correlated to students' attitudes and perceptions of the course and overall satisfaction with the course.
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