Students--Religious life

Preaching the Gospel Anew: Forming Redemptorist Students for the Ministry of Prophetic Preaching

Author
Peter Davidson Hill D.Min.
Abstract
Prophetic preaching is essential to the life of the Church and in the life of the Redemptorists, who are called to preach the Good News to the abandoned, especially the poor. It is established that prophetic preaching is challenging and many preachers are hesitant to preach a prophetic message. This thesis examines the history of prophetic preaching, with particular attention to the Old Testament prophets and the work of Frank Thomas. In conversations with Redemptorist preachers and leaders, this thesis proposes effective ways through which Redemptorist students can be formed for the mission as prophetic preachers of the Good News to the abandoned, especially the poor. Through questionnaires and sample homilies by twelve Redemptorists, I have concluded that Redemptorists do preach prophetically and that the practice of training men to preach prophetically must be part of the formal training. To this end, a course in prophetic preaching is to be developed for the training of Redemptorist seminarians for the ministry of prophetic preaching.

DESI CAMPUS MINISTRY: TRAINING MATERIALS FOR EQUIPPING STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS TO COACH LOCAL DESIGN MOVEMENT CHAPTERS

Author
Mark Covel D.Min.
Abstract
As part of the campus ministry of Cru, Design Movement seeks to come alongside the South Asian American college community. The purpose of this research was to gauge the effectiveness of specific training materials for equipping campus ministry workers for the ministry of Design Movement. To accomplish this, a newly written set of training materials were field tested, reviewed, and evaluated for effectiveness.

Design Movement uses a contextualized approach to ministry. It is a collegiate ministry seeking to come alongside the desi, or South Asian American, community. This community includes students who are Indian American, Pakistani American, Sri Lankan American, Bangladeshi American, Nepali American, Bhutanese American, and Maldivian American. Many of these American college students have a Hindu or Muslim background, while a smaller percentage of South Asian American students have a Christian background.

This major project arose from the need for more current and specific ministry training for staff and volunteers and resulted in the creation of the Design Movement Ambassador Training. The training is divided into four categories: “Learn about South Asian American Culture,” “Leverage Culture for Outreach,” “Launch and Grow a Design Movement,” and “Lead a Design Student Team.” Each category contains six modules for a total of twenty-four topics.

The study revealed that the training materials were successful in being able to equip campus ministers to effectively come alongside the desi community. The five Cru staff who participated in a focus group grew in their understanding about this contextualized ministry. The feedback from the five staff and four Consultants provided suggestions for minor improvements to the materials, including a few additional modules. Training materials specific to Design Movement proved helpful for meeting the needs of coaching students in Design Movement.

Equipping selected members of Chinese Christian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with essential apologetic engagement skills

Author
William L Englehart
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected members of Chinese Christian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with essential apologetic engagement skills. The project director researched the field of apologetics, chose five apologetic skills, and then prepared file lessons teaching the essential apologetic skills to a select group of college students and working professionals. The project director presented the material in five sessions. Prior to teaching the lessons, and apologetic expert reviewed and evaluated the research for the project, and a curriculum expert reviewed and evaluated the style and content of the curriculum. Those evaluation tools enabled the project director to create an effective resource for equipping young adults in essential apologetic skills.

A Quest for Koinonia: Uncovering Spiritual Practices that Inspire and Promote Unity among Christians within a Contemporary Campus Setting

Author
Diane Reneé Schmit Dardón D.Min.
Abstract
The quest for koinonia among Christians on college and university campuses -- and specifically at DePaul University in Chicago -- is at the heart of this thesis-project. Like so many campus settings throughout the United States, the Christian community at DePaul is complicated, diverse, and marked distinctly by distrust, skepticism, and conflict between Christian students and between Christian groups on campus. This thesis-project posits that spiritual practices inherent in the Body of Christ might encourage and inspire Christian unity on campus. Spiritual practices that emerge through explorations of the experiences and hopes of college students, major global ecumenical movements, and early followers of Christ in Corinth will be considered as a means for developing a pastoral response to the issue of conflict and dissension among Christians on campus and beyond. A brief foray into faith developmental theory, Millennial and post-Millennial generational studies, and ethnocentricity also provide helpful insights. The Practical Theology method and model developed by Evelyn and James Whitehead guide this thesis-project as the work strives to shed light on ways in which koinonia might be realized among Christians within a contemporary higher education setting.

[Online cocurricular models for spiritual growth]

Author
Bryan D Gill
Abstract
The purpose of this project was for twelve online Professional Studies students at Samford University to have been nurtured in faith and personhood through a fully online cocurricular model for spiritual growth. During this 8-week project, students engaged in personal and communal spiritual grwoth activities using various technologies including Samford's learning management system, synchronous videoconferencing, text-based mobile applications, and a Christian video repository. This project resulted in 50 percent of participants showing evidence toward attaining outcomes, which exceeded the goal of 33 percent. However, further study is needed before this strategy is implemented university-wide.

Emerging adult spiritual formation practicing faithfulness in fellows programs

Author
Chad H Donohoe
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how Fellows alumni describe the formative experiences of their Fellows Program. Three research questions guided this study: How do Fellows alumni describe the formative practices of the Fellows Program? How do Fellows alumni describe the impact of their Fellows Program? How do Fellows alumni describe the role of the local congregation in their Fellows Program? The study revealed no overall decline in the faith of emerging adults during college, highlighted factors influencing the increase or decline of their faith, and demonstrated that they need the cultivation of right loves.

Intrinsic motivation in identity development: a biblical approach to psychometric testing in a Canadian discipleship environment

Author
Bradley D Friesen
Abstract
The problem this project addressed was the ineffectiveness of self-measurement tools currently used for discipleship by Canadian discipleship and Bible colleges (CDBC) to guide their students toward self-identification for life development and planning. In response to this problem the researcher conducted an in-depth qualitative study of self-measurement tools in which he compared these tools to a biblical gauge for self-measurement. He then led ten undergraduate students through a semester-long discipleship program that centered on the tests that he deemed most appropriate. He measured the students' growth of self-knowledge and motivation over the duration of the semester.

Developing a strategy to connect students of Auburn University at Montgomery Alabama to local area Baptist churches

Author
Terry L Dymond
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a strategy to connect students associated with Baptist Campus Ministries on the campus of Auburn Montgomery to local area Baptist churches. The process of developing a strategy included forming a strategy development team from local area ministers as well as lay church members who work with college students. This team was involved throughout the process of exploration, planning, development, and the preliminary stage of implementation. The process of implementation in regard to this project was to present the developed strategy to the Directors of Missions from Autauga, Elmore, and Montgomery associations as well as the Director of the office of Collegiate and Student Ministries from the Alabama Baptist State Board of Missions. The rejection of approval of this project by the Directors of Missions and the Director of the office of Collegiate and Student Ministries will not determine the success of the project. The goal of this project is to develop and present a strategy. Approval or rejection of the project goes beyond the scope of the project.

Trinitarian missional matrix: framing a community of integrated faith, learning, and mission

Author
Steve S Sherman
Abstract
This thesis examined relational trinitarian theology as a theological matrix for creating an undergraduate senior year capstone course to prepare students to enter the professional world as a participating disciple of Christ. Relational trinitarian theology provides an integrated vision for life and living in the context of the missio Dei and provides a model for holistic missional living in community and vocation. The outcome of this research was the development of a curriculum utilizing a "backward design" model that begins with desired outcomes and then works backwards to design learning activities that will shape those outcomes.

An academic course on spiritual formation: understanding, developing, and implementing a strategy for spiritual growth of students in a Christian higher education institution

Author
Young Ho Hwang
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis-project is to understand the process of spiritual formation in order to develop and implement an academic course on spiritual formation that will help students to mature spiritually. Conclusions are drawn from a survey of works on the critical factors that contribute to the process of spiritual formation. Spiritual formation is "being alive to God" and "being like God." That is, a person undergoing spiritual formation grows in intimacy, love, devotion and knowledge of God and becomes more like God in his thoughts, emotions, desires and behavior. The basic factors in this process are: (1) what God has done for the believer, (2) what God has made possible for him/her, and (3) how a Christian responds to what God has done and made possible for him/her. These factors are rooted in God's sovereign grace. God makes spiritual formation possible and works with his people as they go through the process of spiritual formation. This two credit hour academic course on spiritual formation has been developed for undergraduate students at a Christian university. Students will gain valuable knowledge regarding spiritual formation and experience training that is critical for a lifestyle that makes spiritual formation possible. The course design was evaluated by several university faculty members who approved it "across the board."
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