Stewardship, Christian

Using Luke's Slave Metaphor to Teach the Biblical Foundations for Financial Stewardship at First Baptist Church of Buffalo Gap, Texas

Author
Charles Leon Gililland
Abstract
This project evaluated whether a financial stewardship study built around Christ-centered stewardship principles (derived from Luke’s servant parables employing slavery metaphor) instead of practical financial planning could affect change in small group members' financial stewardship habits at First Baptist Church of Buffalo Gap, Texas.
Chapter 1 introduces the financial problem facing the Church today even in the midst of the American financial recovery, and the thesis of the project is presented. In addition, the theological background for the study with exegetical analysis of the Lukan parables is presented.
Chapter 2 outlines the project research plan and methodology. A weekly progress report is also included in this chapter.
Chapter 3 presents the qualitative and quantitative project analysis gathered from both a pre- and post-study survey and a pre- and post-study financial giving report. The chapter concludes with an executive summary that outlines the positive change in group members' habits and suggestions for further implementation of the project.

Incorporating giving as an integral part of worship at Blessed Harvest Institute of Charlotte, North Carolina

Author
Brian Gerard Fite
Abstract
Giving is one of the most effective forms of worship we have available to us, but it has become the most exploitive and misunderstood element of the worship service. The methods and language used to frame giving within worship have led to exploitation resulting in unwillingness to wholeheartedly participate in giving as an element of worship. The literature addressing giving and the biblical interpretations are lacking in accurately speaking to the issues that arise in applying Old and New Testament scripture to address giving as an element of worship. There are a growing number of articles attempting to address the covetous nature involved in the methods and language used in inviting people to give to God. This work evaluated the giving practice in Blessed Harvest Institute by evaluating some Old and New Testament scriptures and determining how the interpretations are to be applied in the methods and language used to frame the giving experience in the worship service. Leviticus 27:30-33, Deuteronomy 14:22-29, Malachi 3, Acts 3-5, 2 Corinthians 8-9, and other scriptures were used to understand the methods and language of giving biblically. Giving is to be a freewill expression of worship executed in an environment of liberty. It is necessary to reframe the concept of tithing not to be an obligation but a personal choice to express worship to God. Any prompting will remove worship from giving. Worship is a free expression that must be voluntary; therefore, giving must be voluntarily expressed, not grudgingly, by compulsion or of necessity, in order to be an element of worship.

STUDYING THE IMPACT OF INTRODUCING A FOR-PROFIT SUBSIDIARY TO A LOCAL CONGREGATION

Author
Bradley Scott Stagg D.Min.
Abstract
This doctoral research project studied the impact of introducing a for-profit subsidiary to a local nonprofit congregation. The study reveals congregational leaders experienced emancipatory feelings of hope and spiritual agency when utilizing the innovation tool of a business Miniplan. Liberating congregations from the oppression of financial scarcity freed church leaders to consider new ways to address increasing costs, particularly deferred maintenance of aging buildings. This project used Participating Action Research as its research orientation, since it is ideal for business and church research. All participants reported significant spiritual growth in stewardship; emancipatory feelings of hope; and generalizability for the larger church.

Faith finance and a plan a Methodist tactical approach to personal stewardship

Author
Daryl L Williams
Abstract
The author researched the link between faith and financial stewardship in Christians to prove that linking spirituality to financial teachings would prompt Christians to be better stewards. The author conducted a six-week seminar, which immersed participants in a financial literacy class that taught both tactical and spiritual approaches to finances. The analysis of the responses of participants indicated that having faith as a part of their financial teaching was instrumental in their motivation to complete the program as well as implement it. Also, the research suggested that the program would lead participants to become more generous givers to their church.

Leading a Local Congregation to Develop A Theology of Stewardship Based on Bilblical Truth

Author
James A Gibson
Abstract
The project's context was the Greater Temple Missionary Baptist Church located at 300 Fourth Avenue West in Birmingham, Alabama. The ministry problem that was identified was the need to improve the decline in church donations. It was hypothesized that developing a Theology of Stewardship would increase the contributions to the church. The methodology used by this project for training the congregation was eight sermons on stewardship, a focus group study, and field notes. The data collection and analysis process involved posttest and pretest surveys, interviews, an field notes. Contributions were increased.

The Effects of Holistic Stewardship Training

Author
Hugh D Duckett
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to impact the stewardship habits of congregational members at the Morning Star Baptist Church in Catonsville, Maryland. The project included a quantitative survey that assessed the impact of the ten-week course conducted through the Stewardship ministry. The survey was given at the beginning of the course and at the conclusion of the course. The course had an overall favorable impact on the participants based on the survey. The course supported the conclusion that instructing participants on holistic stewardship will encourage them to exercise better stewardship habits with the resources they have.

Stewardship: an epiphany!

Author
Sarah S Butter
Abstract
The author makes the biblical, theological, and liturgical case for the season of Epiphany as a faithful and effective liturgical home for the practice of stewardship campaigns in 21st century American Protestant congregations. She reviews historical and contemporary meanings and models of stewardship, emphasizing the contextual and adaptive nature of annual giving campaigns in churches. Her research explores her own experience and the experience of five early adopter congregations with the model. Her findings affirm the liturgical, Christological resonance of the model and its faithfulness and effectiveness. In addition, she points to its powerful potential for missional interpretation of stewardship.

How business leaders partner with other Christians for inter-cultural, inter-denominational, and transformational development in urban missions

Author
Julian C Russell
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to understand the challenges encountered by Christian business leader from suburban churches who are committed to inter-cultural, inter-denominational, transformational urban missions. This study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with eight business leaders from suburban Presbyterian churches. The findings of the study were that these business leaders are to pay careful attention to several important principles of inter-cultural leadership in collaborating for transformational development. The first conclusion regarding leadership roles was that suburban business leaders play very significant and changing roles in both inter-cultural and homogenous partnerships. The second conclusion regarding cultural intelligence was that business leaders realize the need to develop a deeper understanding of their partners from diverse cultures. The third conclusion regarding the politics of power was that business leaders have to negotiate with others from both the urban communities, as well as the centralized powers within their own suburban congregations. The fourth conclusion regarding mutual transformation was that business leaders realized that true change in the urban communities is directly correlated to true change within their own suburban communities.

After the plant: transitioning a church plant into a healthy mature congregation

Author
John R Braland
Abstract
The author attempted to determine if any characteristics could be identified that might help a church plant transition into a healthy, mature congregation. The mixed methods research approach was utilized, revealing realistic expectations, a stewardship plan, leadership development plan, and planter peer group all assisted a church transition. Successful churches evangelized adults aged 19-30 and had at least 100 people in attendance by year three. They recognized developed organizational systems and implemented a stewardship development plan that created a culture of giving that became apparent by year three. The church planting model made no statistical difference on survivability.

Mission and stewardship: loving God and neighbor with our heart and our treasure

Author
Brandi Richelle Casto-Waters
Abstract
When asked which commandment in the law was the greatest, Jesus said, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself'" (Matt. 22:36-38). This report explores the relationship of mission and stewardship. It is focused on the life of a particular congregation where increased involvement in hands-on mission has led to a deepened understanding of stewardship. Engaging in ministry with people who are hurting, grieving, lonely, poor, and oppressed, and working together for justice, peace, and reconciliation has directly affected how members of the community are faithful stewards of all that God has entrusted to their care. Jesus also said, "For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also" (Matt. 6:21). This research indicates that the inverse is also true. When people invest their hearts in the mission of the church it is very likely their treasure will follow.
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