Spiritual life

Assessing the Physical and Spiritual Needs of Homeless Women for Memphis Union Mission, Memphis, TN

Author
Randy Daniels
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to assess the physical and spiritual needs of homeless women in Memphis, Tennessee. The outcome was to make ministry recommendations to the Memphis Union Mission. The project director gathered and synthesized statistical data of homeless women. The project director organized information available for homeless women from existing agencies. The project director sources material by utilizing surveys completed by homeless women. Data from these surveys gave the project director information to ascertain their physical and spiritual needs. The project director recruited and assembled a recommendation team and presented a recommendation.

Psychopharmacology as a Secondary Means of Grace: The Pastoral Vision of Wesleyan-Holiness Pastors in the Upper Ohio River Valley of West Virginia, 2017

Author
Heather Vacek
Abstract
Since the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has spread in Western society, how can positive attitudes about psychiatric medications be best encouraged among the Wesleyan-Holiness pastors in the Upper Ohio River Valley of West Virginia? Through a survey involving fourteen pastors and a seminar engaging six pastors, the author--a pastor with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)--demonstrates the effectiveness of an interactive seminar in developing balanced yet positive attitudes about psychiatric medications. Mapes' argument focuses on the medical, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of psychiatric disorders, presenting psychopharmacology as the "way of Naaman" and yet as an essential option.

Praying with Waldo: reclaiming the spiritual practices of nineteenth-century Unitarians

Author
Robert M Hardies
Abstract
Contemporary Unitarian Universalists can enrich their spiritual lives by reclaiming the spiritual disciplines of their nineteenth-century Unitarian and Transcendentalist ancestors. Using sermons, devotional manuals, journals, memoirs, letters and other primary source material, the author rediscovers and reconstructs the spiritual theology and spiritual practices of nineteenth-century Unitarians and Transcendentalists. He creatively re-appropriates and re-packages these practices for use by contemporary Unitarian Universalists, including teaching handouts and syllabi for congregational and graduate school classes. The project demonstrates the potential of this work to enrich contemporary Unitarian Universalist spirituality.

The spiritual life and ministerial crises

Author
Todd H Benner
Abstract
A leading cause for pastors leaving the ministry is a weak spiritual life. As a result, their experience of ministerial crises are defeating. The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between ministerial crises and pastors' spiritual lives. The information was gathered from United Methodist pastors in Kentucky through an interview process. Findings revealed that those pastors who have a growing spiritual edge in their lives and ministry generally survive crises; whereas, pastors that do not struggle.

Guidance in and experience of liturgical prayer as an element of personal and communal worship in the Reformed tradition

Author
John E Harris
Abstract
The author developed a workbook and leader's guide he used in a workshop to offer guidance and experience in liturgical prayer as an element of personal and communal worship in the Reformed tradition. In this doctoral paper he defines terms, explores assumptions, reflects on personal experience, analyzes local settings, describes the biblical, theological, and ministerial issues, and presents the theoretical foundation on which he developed the project. He also describes the project, analyzes his situation in ministry, explains the project's design and its implementation, offers an evaluation, and reflects on implications for further ministry. The workbook and leader's guide are included.

Coming into our own: helping African American families to name, claim and live out their spirituality

Author
Joyce Florence Gillie
Abstract
The author addresses the question "how do we call people to Christian discipleship in the Postmodern era?" Providing an overview of the Premodern, Modern, and Postmodern eras, she names both the understanding of them as a time in history and the African/African-American social-political and spiritual reality of the time. She uses the African-American family to provide a generational vandtage point for viewing and discussing the topic of Postmodern culture, racism, the hip-hop generation, black spirituality, and the Catholic faith. Bringing Postmodern culture in dialogue with the attributes of black spirituality and the Catholic faith, she contextualizes a pastoral response.
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