Social justice

Transforming Attitudes and Commitment to Missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Greenville, South Carolina

Author
Jermaine A Boyce
Abstract
This ministry project's goal was to seek transformation in attitudes and commitment to missions at the Mt. Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Greenville, South Carolina. The goal of transformation was to guide the congregation's mission practices to be exemplary of its 'Missionary' name and the overall mission of the church as discovered in Luke-Acts and in the Abrahamic Covenant.

The project tested the attitudes and commitment to missions from the Missionary Society in comparison to the general congregation. The project revealed both strengths and weaknesses in the attitudes and commitments of the Missionary Society and the congregation about missions. The research from the project revealed that there were strong contradictions between the findings from the surveys completed by the project participants and the content from the discussions during the training exercises. One of the three primary goals was achieved outright, and several secondary goals emerged as a result of the project; particularly the creation of a strategic plan to assess and evaluate the future mission practices of the church.

UnderANDING

Author
J A T
Abstract
There is a documented need for caring education regarding patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) for nursing students and nursing staff. The autism spectrum population is increasing, one in 59 children in the United States as reported by the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network (as cited in Baio et al., 2018). Nurses are expected to provide appropriate care, showing respect and understanding at all times to both the client and family. Through lack of knowledge and misunderstanding the ASD population has not been given this care. Based on Watson’s Theory of Caring, an educational ASD caring program was created for a summer session Family Nurse Practitioner assessment class. This educational program provided basic knowledge of ASD and appropriate communication skills for caregivers, guided by caring science concepts. Using the Caring Factor Survey-Care Provider Version, Short Version (CFS-CPV) by Nelson, Thiel, Hozak, and Thomas (2016), and the Autism Knowledge Survey-Revised (AKS-R) by Swiezy, Stuart, and Ashby (2005), student perceived ability to care and student knowledge of ASD were measured. Nursing curriculums and continuing education offerings should include knowledge related to working with special populations, such as those with communication disorders. Nursing practice guided by caring science principles help nurses to build authentic relationships with patients and families resulting in better health outcomes. THIS WAS PLACED IN INCORRECT LOCATION. PLEASE DISMISS. Thank you.

A STUDY OF THE USE OF SCIENTIFIC LANGUAGE BY GEORGE MACLEOD, FOUNDER OF THE IONA COMMUNITY

“What’s the matter? … matter is the matter!”

Author
Mitchell Bunting D.Min.
Abstract
A study of George MacLeod, founder of the Iona Community, and his use of language taken from modern physics. He responds to the dropping of atom bombs in 1945 and develops theological insight into the Incarnation of Christ. His words are recalled as pithy sayings and poetic prayers often associated with in his anti-nuclear campaigning in the Church and the House of Lords. The study draws on his published works including the Iona Community magazine Coracle and the documentary film Sermon in Stone as well as interviews with Iona Community members to assess the significance of his use of such language.

The Crucible of Orthodoxy and Orthopraxy: Examining the Intersections of Social Justice, Moral Development and Theology

Author
Eydie Ann Dyke-Shypulski
Abstract
An apparent disconnect exists regarding how people of faith apply personal morals and theological perspectives when positioning themselves with regard to public policy and social justice issues. Through an exploratory quantitative design, the researcher sought to extract information that would have implications for professional social practice, social work ethical and practice pedagogy, and for faith-based institutions of higher learning. A theological reflection included a brief examination of Aristotle, St. Thomas, Newburg and non-violent atonement theology. The literature review included Kohlberg, Freud and Skinner's views on moral development. The researcher employed and exploratory quantitative study design with two survey instruments.

Investigating resistance to education for social justice in a Roman Catholic, U.S., Midwest suburban context

Author
Roxanne M Meshar
Abstract
This project investigated causes of resistance to engage in the area of social justice for Roman catholic, middle-class, Euro-Americans in a U.S., Midwest, suburban, context. background research used feminist and socio-economic/racial "over privilege" lenses. Qualitative interviews revealed causes including a fear of confusion, fear of change or having perspectives changed. Feeling that issues sere too overwhelming was mentioned, as were busyness with work and family responsibilities. Leverage respondents' interest in spirituality to educate about social justice. use methods that don't require reading. Avoid themes of "change" or "personal transformation." Engage interest in charity to disclose underlying systemic causes.

Don't swallow that camel: developing a preaching ministry that produces transformation in a church's participation in justice-related ministries

Author
Keith A Manry
Abstract
This project argues that there is a direct connection between references to God's concern for the poor and the oppressed in the preaching of a local church and the church's ministry to the same. It suggests that preachers can play a role in bringing about transformation in the area of justice by stressing the importance of justice in scripture and in the life of the believer. By studying the preaching and ministry of Media Presbyterian Church it shows that a preaching ministry concerned with justice can bring about transformation in a congregation's participation in justice related ministries.

Stories of hope: educating for activism and justice in the black church

Author
Donald L Perryman
Abstract
This project attempts to design, implement, and evaluate a model of Christian education as a resource for various forms of political activism and social justice involvement. A phenomenological framework informed by narrative inquiry methodology suggests that activism among African American females in an urban congregation is more likely to take place where the participants develop their capacity by first dealing with their own personal issues as a part of their civic skill development. The desire to transform society appears linked to personal transformation and a sense of purpose and may likely take place in a liberatory experience that comes out of the learner's lived experience rather than a fixed, standardized educational program.

Beyond volunteering: reclaiming the works of mercy as a means of grace

Author
William E Cook
Abstract
It has been the author's experience that in local congregations social justice concerns tend to become secondary issues that are not considered essential either to the identity of the church or Christian life. Using the Wesleyan quadrilateral to structure a theological foundation, the author argued that engagement in such concerns is essential to both. The author presented a project that provides one way to link the works of mercy to a congregation's understanding of its Christian identity and practice. The author completed the project by interviewing congregants who were engaged in the project. The author concluded that while the project did provide such a link, the work to integrate social justice and Christian identity must be ongoing.

Preaching social justice

Author
Edward J Crotty
Abstract
This project is a study focusing on effectively preaching social justice. The research is centered around preparation and analysis of a series of four sermons on social justice. An attempt was made to demonstrate to the congregation that social justice is a central theme running throughout the whole Bible. Particular emphasis is placed on the preaching of the prophets and Jesus' ministry of preaching and teaching. A cross-section of the researcher's congregation was asked questions before the sermon series began, after each of the four social justice sermons, and after the whole series had been completed. There was a discernible difference in the audience's opinions on why people are poor and in the audience's intention to change structural injustice. In addition, there was an increase in the respondents' ability to identify biblical texts that address social justice and an increase in their ability to apply biblical social justice to local, national, and global issues. The project showed discernable differences in attitudes about social justice and willingness to work for social justice after the series of sermons.

Social holiness: experiments in prayer and other subversive acts in the local church and community

Author
Duane Clinker
Abstract
Renewing churches following Jesus into the twenty-first century will find themselves caught in a postmodern context of environmental degradation, increasing polarity between rich and poor, and oppressive empire that will require them to grapple with issues of social holiness. The author explores a theology and methodology of holiness based on the understanding that it is a singularity that cannot be separated into acts of individual piety versus social holiness. Experimenting with prayerful, social justice action, the author discovers the usefulness of community-building, confrontational "prayer actions" in deepening the discipleship and renewal of one local working-class congregation.
Subscribe to Social justice