Servant leadership

The importance of reading congregational culture for effective church leadership

Author
Edwin Eng Wei Wong
Abstract
This project paper seeks to provide practical tools to help pastors and leaders understand congregational culture to effectively lead their ministries. Drawing pointers from the servant-leadership practices of Nehemiah as well as other resources, the author formulates approaches to managing transition and leading change. Recommendations, based on broad observations from a survey on a small group of itinerant pastors in Singapore, are subsequently drawn.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

"Lessons of Hospitality in the Parables of Jesus: Inspiring a Congregation to Transform Its Ways of Loving and Serving Neighbors"

Author
Joan Warren Gandy D.Min.
Abstract
This project proposes that lessons of hospitality in the parables of Jesus can inspire a congregation to transform its ways of loving and serving neighbors. The congregation took part in an eight-week study with multiple opportunities to engage the parables each week. Research methods included ethnographic practices of listening, observing, and reading historical documents; written surveys to gauge how participants viewed congregational hospitality and service to neighbors before and after the study; and practical theological methods such as reflection/action and the four tasks of practical theological interpretation. The research discloses the power of parables to stir hearts for neighborhood mission.

Equipping Selected Men of First Southern Baptist Church, Del City, Oklahoma, with Servant Leadership Skills

Author
Robert J Schobert
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected men of First Southern Baptist Church, Del City, Oklahoma, with servant leadership skills utilizing the Equipping Program Model.

The project director's first goal was to research the field of servant leadership in order to identify servant leadership skills. He then developed curriculum to meet his second goal of equipping selected men of the church with selected servant leadership skill. The curriculum consisted of six lessons with associated lesson plans, student handouts, and computer presentation slides. The professional goals were to increase the project director's knowledge of servant leadership to increase the project director's skill in curriculum development.

The project director equipped selected men with servant leadership skills through the instruction of the developed curriculum. He titled the curriculum "Created to Lead, Called to Serve: Foundations in Servant Leadership" and provided curriculum delivery to twelve participants as a discipleship training course in accordance with the church training calendar.

PRINCIPLES FOR CHRISTIAN LEADERS TRAINING IN THE MONGOLIAN CONTEXT

Author
Steve Posey D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry Project was designed to discover key leadership principles to serve as the basis for leadership training curriculum for emerging Christian leaders in the Mongolian cultural setting. Furthermore, it sought to discover effective pedagogical principals and methods to be employed in teaching the material to the anticipated participants, adult Mongolian learners.

The methodological research was based on a qualitative methods strategy. Eleven information-rich Mongolian Christian leaders were interviewed using an eight-question ethnographic protocol instrument. Two Mongolian university professors, representatives of the sociological and anthropological sciences, and two expatriate missionaries resident in the country for over ten years and involved in developing leaders were also interviewed using the instrument.

Research also included study of contemporary scholarly leadership literature, both secular and Christian. The research sought to unearth contemporary thinking about leadership’s essence and exercise in the Mongolian culture. Biblical study of representative, Godly leaders in search of the leadership principles that characterize their lives and ministry was undertaken in conjunction with the qualitative and literary research.

The key conclusion of the project research was that in spite of a cultural preponderance of dictatorial leadership, ethnographic respondents, literature, and biblical study indicated that a leadership curriculum for Mongolian Christian leaders should focus on the dynamics of servant leadership, as espoused in the Bible, and it’s practical application in Mongolian society. Pedagogically an adult learner strategy needs to be used in teaching the training curriculum comprised of leadership principles.

Equipping selected leaders at First Baptist Church, DeLeon, Texas, with team-based ministry competencies

Author
Daniel Harper
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected leaders at First Baptist Church, DeLeon, Texas, with team-based ministry competencies. This doctoral project involved three parts. First, the project director researched the field of team ministry through the creation of an annotated bibliography, focusing on the topics of team ministry and leadership. The information gathered from the annotated bibliography was used to create a report on best team ministry practices. Second, the project director utilized this information to develop a team ministry workshop. This workshop was comprised of four sessions that were each divided into two parts. Finally, the project director utilized the workshop to equip a selected group of leaders in team ministry competencies.

Designing a Volunteer Leadership Development Strategy for Northshore Church, Slidell, Louisiana

Author
Andrew R Ogea D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to design a volunteer leadership development strategy for Northshore Church, Slidell, Louisiana. The project director trained a selected team to design a strategy in order to develop volunteer leaders. The strategy included a combination of best practices gleaned from the research of various models of leadership development and a profile of volunteer leadership needs and challenges determined through an internal audit of current volunteer leaders at Northshore Church. The project director concluded the project by presenting the strategy to the Leadership team of Northshore Church for approval.

This abstract was submitted without the required word length.

Using Spiritual Direction for Intercultural Development: An Integrative Journey

Author
Deborah Renee Penny D.Min.
Abstract
As seminaries strive to prepare students for increasingly multicultural societies, they must develop new ways to extend and teach hospitality and respond to cultural conflicts. Traditional approaches have largely focused on external behaviors. However, self-awareness and self- knowledge are critical components of intercultural development. Individuals cannot authentically engage cultural similarities and differences without awareness of their own cultural orientation. The ancient church practices of spiritual direction, when combined with the psychometric benefits of the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) and Intercultural Development Plan (IDP), can enhance cultural adeptness and improve self-awareness. This research project demonstrates the outcomes of this integrated strategy.

Apostolic Women Religious in the United States and Their Legacy

Author
Janice J Brown O.P. D.Min.
Abstract
The legacy of Jesus has manifested itself among different populations, within different cultures, and during different times. This thesis-project looks at this manifestation as it unfolds as the legacy of apostolic women religious in the United States. The legacy of each participating congregation was described as a mission or more specifically as the mission of Jesus. It has also been the experience of these women religious that legacy is most tangible in the relationships and trust they built with their students, coworkers, and community members with whom they worked and partnered.
The legacy of apostolic women religious is a witness to the gospel message that took root as Christianity two thousand years ago. The thesis-project begins by exploring the legacy of Jesus, as well as the historical context that furthers God’s mission through the lives of three historical women – Hildegard of Bingen, Catherine of Siena, and Angela Merici. The research then flows into the brief history of the Ursuline Sisters in the United States. Reviewing the pre and post-Vatican II eras and their influence on religious life helps lay a foundation upon which apostolic women today have been formed.
The primary data was gathered through focus group discussions involving seven congregations consisting of thirty-five apostolic women religious. Their comments are summarized first by congregation in order to maintain the richness within each discussion, then by main themes, and concluded with a reflection on the legacy of these women as it finds meaning through the Gospel of John.
Legacy has many definitions, but what surfaced most prominently was legacy as ministry, and the ministries are what define the women. Legacy efforts included developing relationships, education, healing, inclusivity, and service. All of these works could be imagined as the ongoing narrative of the Gospels, epitomized in the Beloved Disciple.

Providing relevant and effective leadership for millennials

Author
Valorie C Nordbye
Abstract
This thesis surveyed the leadership style preference of Millennials. Other areas focused on their loyalty to bosses, the importance of a company's values and social practices, and their preferences about working independently of collaboratively. Members of an American college ministry were surveys using an online survey tool. Based on 261 surveys, 85 percent chose servant leadership as their preferred style. The majority indicated that the values and social practices of their employer were important to them and that they would leave a job to remain with a boss they liked. there was no clear preference on working collaboratively or independently.

Forming servant leaders increasing congregational involvement in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod

Author
Heath A Trampe
Abstract
The researcher, working with the leadership of St. Paul's Church, a 2023 member congregation affiliated with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, undertook a qualitative, phenomenological study to discover a more effective method for increasing active church involvement through the discipling of servant leaders. Forty interviews were conducted, resulting in five implications: expectations of leadership by laity, congregational identity, congregational connections, life factors, and expectations of laity by leadership. The resulting data informed a new method of listening to, and learning from, members of the congregation, as well as a new process for church leadership to articulate its desires.
Subscribe to Servant leadership